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  • What Are Croatian People Like?

    @KnezIvan Tito was just a figure, face of the regime, he wasn't much of a factor after the 50s. People surrounding him did all the work, it's often mentioned that he never even knew what our own money looks like. Of course there was some prosecution, especially in late 40s, but as a historian you know, you shouldn't take it out of context. As somebody here already mentioned, all collaborators (except the leaders of course) were given a chance when it was clear how the war will end. And prosecution in Yugoslavia was basically nothing compared to the East, I'm not trying to belittle it with this, just our regime and system isn't so comparable with classic dictatorship. Tito, that is Yugoslav communists made a cult of personality out of Tito, that's their biggest sin IMO, if there wasn't for that we would've separated much more peacefully, if it even came to separation. And last, but not least, I could never equate Fascist/Nazi leaders with communist ones (not even Stalin or Kims), simply because first ones killed, that is destroyed people because of who they are, simply because they were born, while "communists" eliminated political opponents, that is ones they saw as such, you have to admit, it's much easier to conceal your political views than a fact you were born.
  • What Are Croatian People Like?

    @KnezIvan Tito was just a figure, face of the regime, he wasn't much of a factor after the 50s. People surrounding him did all the work, it's often mentioned that he never even knew what our own money looks like. Of course there was some prosecution, especially in late 40s, but as a historian you know, you shouldn't take it out of context. As somebody here already mentioned, all collaborators (except the leaders of course) were given a chance when it was clear how the war will end. And prosecution in Yugoslavia was basically nothing compared to the East, I'm not trying to belittle it with this, just our regime and system isn't so comparable with classic dictatorship. Tito, that is Yugoslav communists made a cult of personality out of Tito, that's their biggest sin IMO, if there wasn't for that we would've separated much more peacefully, if it even came to separation. And last, but not least, I could never equate Fascist/Nazi leaders with communist ones (not even Stalin or Kims), simply because first ones killed, that is destroyed people because of who they are, simply because they were born, while "communists" eliminated political opponents, that is ones they saw as such, you have to admit, it's much easier to conceal your political views than a fact you were born.
  • What Are Croatian People Like?

    Partisans in Serbia were just damaging factor. They made damage beyond repair. Nobody in Serbia likes Tito but old grandpas.
  • What Are Croatian People Like?

    KnezIvan To understand history you have to take it from the context of the time when it happened. "Tito was hardly democratic leader..." What do you think, which leader was democratic in 1945? Are you really naive to think that there was any chance for democracy in the former YU in 1945? This was not England or America. "Both Tito and Pavelić were/are in today's context war criminals, dictators etc..." Firstly, you can't put those two in the same sentence. I don't know where did you learn your history, but let me tell you that Tito was no war criminal, on contrary, he was the most respected leader of the 20th Century. What I find interesting is that Serbs, as soon as they hear the name Tito, the smile graces their faces, but they have no particular reason to like him. Croats, such as yourself, pretend that Tito and Yugoslavia never happened, but if it wasn't for Tito and Yugoslavia, today Croatia would be a small region of who knows which country. NDH was an officially Fascist state. Do you know what happened to Fascist states in 1945? Japan was nuked, Germany was split up...and Croatia was given back Istria and half of the Dalmatian Coast...Djilas and Rankovic made sure that Mosa Piade's idea that Serbs in Croatia should have their autonomic regions, never realized. So my friend, instead of collectively being arseholes, you should all be thankful for the Yugo Partisans and Tito, because without them, you wouldn't have Croatia of today.
  • Bosnians. Serbs? Croats? Or something completely different?

    Bosnians are special people, and they have nothing in common with the Serbs and Croats. Genetically all the globe inhabited by the same people that are higher or lower affinity, with some insignificant local variations.

    Bosanci su poseban narod i oni nemaju ništo zajedničko sa Srbima i Hrvatima. Genetski je sva zemaljska kugla naseljena istim ljudima koji se nalaze u manoj ili većoj srodnosti, uz neka beznačajna lokalna odstupanja.

    The people is what is gained by living in a biocenosis. tasko formed different traditions, beliefs, culture, and therefore history. Whether it was or not immigration to the population in an area through the entire duration retains some of its uniqueness in comparison to others. That's how people are different.

    Narod je ono što se stiče življenjem u nekoj biocenozi. tasko se formiraju različite tradicije, vjerovanja, kulture, pa otud i istorije. Bez obzira da li je bilo doseljavanja ili ne to stanovništvo na nekom prostoru kroz svo vrijeme trajanja zadržava neke svoje posebnosti u odnosu na druge. Po tome se razlikuju narodi.

    In Bosnia, the problem is that the only difference between the three dominant nations, religions, and its institutions. So crazy power centers formed their own nation, guided by the interests of empires whose parts were. Thus, in the consciousness of the Serbs, all Eastern Orthodox actually Serbian nation, the Croats are all Catholics, with Bosnians are all Muslims.

    U bosni je problem što su jedine razlike između tri preovlađujuća naroda, vjera, odnosno njezine institucije. Tako su suludi centri moći formirali svoje nacije, vođeni interesima carstava čiji su djelovi bili. Tako su u svjesti Srba, svi pravoslabvni zapravo srpska nacija, kod Hrvata su to svi katolici, kod Bosanaca su to svi muslimani.

    How is this moronic idea sick showed the recent past, where they ran a classic religious war. Of course oloi called out the national elites, and today just waiting to be slaughtered again. This is the result of young raw nations that do not have svioje foundation. All the above nations, since it is based on religion are solid as a soap bubble, why invent all kinds of lies, would not you weary of brothers of another religion.

    Koliko je ta kretenska ideja bolesna pokazala je nedavna prošlost, gdje se vodio klasični vjerski rat. Naravno oloi prozvane i nacionalne elite, i dan danas samo čekaju priliku da se ponovo pokolju. To je posljedica mladih sirovih nacija koje nemaju svioje utemeljenja. Sve gore pomenute nacije, budući se zasnivaju na vjeroispovjesti čvrste su kao balon sapunice, zato smišljaju svakakve laži, nebi li omrznuli braću druge vjere.
  • Bosnians. Serbs? Croats? Or something completely different?

    Serbs and Croats in BiH don't want to admit that they are Bosnians, but for real Serbs and Croats in Serbia and Croatia they will be always Bosnians man.... We Bosniaks don't have that problem, we are Bosnians (people which live in Bosnia) and we proudly say that! and problem in Bosnia is that we have bigger Croats and Serbs here than those real in Serbian and Croatia...
  • Bosnians. Serbs? Croats? Or something completely different?

    They all consider themselves descendants of people who lived in medieval Serbia, Bosnia or Croatia, successors of those states. Serb and Croat nationalists don't think that Bosniaks are nation, they consider them Muslim Serbs/Croats. Other than this, religion and conflicts in the recent past (some 150 years back) there's nothing different between them, genetically they are closest to each other. Bosnia would be better if they considered themselves as one, but Serbs and Croats will never accept to be Bosnians in that sense.
  • What Are Croatian People Like?

    Of course is a dump. That's why you left it...to find a better life in Croatia.
  • Introductions?

    Hello everyone,


    Im not new to slavorum. I've been a member I guess since 2015, but I haven't been very active until recently. I'm curious to get to know everyone a bit, and to see what type of people are on the forum. I would like to tell you a little bit about my self, and would like you to do the same( only if you feel like it, there's no pressure to :) ). I think it will make slavorum a more brotherly and familial type of place, and a nice environment to discuss and express ourselves. So I'll start off by answering a set of questions, and if you guys want to you can do the same!

    Where are you from and what is your background?

    Where I come from is kind of a complicated question for me so I'll take a deep breath and try and explain it to the best of my ability :). I was born in Germany, but moved to Texas only six weeks after my birth. I lived in Texas until I was 14 with a year break at the age of five living in my dad's village in Slovakia. At fourteen my family then moved to Tennessee and we lived 3 years there. then at the age of 17 we moved to New York and I lived 4 years in new York, then went to study german for a year in Vienna, came back to New York for a year, and then moved to England and lived there for two years. I have now been for the past year living and studying in Vienna. I also forgot to mention that I've also lived six months in Bratislava.... I know its complicated, and it's hard for me to remember all of the places I've been. I don't know the reason why my family moved so much but we did, so I've seen quite a bit of the world at the young age of 26. to tell you a little bit about my background...well my Father is from a small village in-between the town of Topolcany and Nitra in Nitriansky kraj, Slovakia. My mother is from Texas, but her grand mother came from Modra, Slovakia, and her grandfather from Trnava, Slovakia. So I am mostly Slovak, but with one of my grandparents being an American from Illinois. So that's kind of my background, Im very proud of my Slovak heritage, but I still am American, and a proud one at that :). I think my international background kind of gives me a good view of the world, and an advantage of being able to separate myself from my background and culture and to look at the world from a certain neutral perspective.

    What Slavic countries would you like to live in or visit(besides your own)?

    So for me, I would love to eventually visit all Slavic countries, but there are a few that arouse my curiosity more than the others. I would love to visit the Balkans, especially Croatia because I think the culture is beautiful and the beaches look amazing. I also would like to visit Serbia, because I've met many Serbians here in Vienna, and they seem to be pretty open and friendly people, at least to me. I also would love to visit Bulgaria, and Russia. Bulgaria has always been a place of interest to me because of its history and role in the Slavic world. They essentially gave all of the Slavic world Christianity and the Cyrillic alphabet, and in many ways have been a cultural birth place for everything Slavic, especially east Slavic, but also for all Slavic peoples. I also would love to visit Russia because its the biggest and most powerful Slavic country. They have not only had a big influence on eastern and central Europe, but on the whole world. Im also a big fan of Vladimir Putin and I would like to see his country first hand :). What about you?

    What Slavic languages are your favorite? (again besides your own)

    So for me I like all Slavic languages but some for different reasons. For me Czech is the cutest language, I love how girls sound when they speak it, and they seem to sing all the time which makes it kind of happy and fun. I also like Serbian and Croatian because it kind of has a cool rhythm, and its very similar to Slovak in a way. Lastly I really like the Russian language. Its a language with a massive literary history, can sound poetic, profound, and pretty bad ass when used by the right person :). So Russian is definitely a language I'd love to learn one day.

    So that's all for me, what about you guys? I'm curious to hear about all of you and I hope you'll all participate in this thread :)

     
  • Introductions?

    Hello everyone,


    Im not new to slavorum. I've been a member I guess since 2015, but I haven't been very active until recently. I'm curious to get to know everyone a bit, and to see what type of people are on the forum. I would like to tell you a little bit about my self, and would like you to do the same( only if you feel like it, there's no pressure to :) ). I think it will make slavorum a more brotherly and familial type of place, and a nice environment to discuss and express ourselves. So I'll start off by answering a set of questions, and if you guys want to you can do the same!

    Where are you from and what is your background?

    Where I come from is kind of a complicated question for me so I'll take a deep breath and try and explain it to the best of my ability :). I was born in Germany, but moved to Texas only six weeks after my birth. I lived in Texas until I was 14 with a year break at the age of five living in my dad's village in Slovakia. At fourteen my family then moved to Tennessee and we lived 3 years there. then at the age of 17 we moved to New York and I lived 4 years in new York, then went to study german for a year in Vienna, came back to New York for a year, and then moved to England and lived there for two years. I have now been for the past year living and studying in Vienna. I also forgot to mention that I've also lived six months in Bratislava.... I know its complicated, and it's hard for me to remember all of the places I've been. I don't know the reason why my family moved so much but we did, so I've seen quite a bit of the world at the young age of 26. to tell you a little bit about my background...well my Father is from a small village in-between the town of Topolcany and Nitra in Nitriansky kraj, Slovakia. My mother is from Texas, but her grand mother came from Modra, Slovakia, and her grandfather from Trnava, Slovakia. So I am mostly Slovak, but with one of my grandparents being an American from Illinois. So that's kind of my background, Im very proud of my Slovak heritage, but I still am American, and a proud one at that :). I think my international background kind of gives me a good view of the world, and an advantage of being able to separate myself from my background and culture and to look at the world from a certain neutral perspective.

    What Slavic countries would you like to live in or visit(besides your own)?

    So for me, I would love to eventually visit all Slavic countries, but there are a few that arouse my curiosity more than the others. I would love to visit the Balkans, especially Croatia because I think the culture is beautiful and the beaches look amazing. I also would like to visit Serbia, because I've met many Serbians here in Vienna, and they seem to be pretty open and friendly people, at least to me. I also would love to visit Bulgaria, and Russia. Bulgaria has always been a place of interest to me because of its history and role in the Slavic world. They essentially gave all of the Slavic world Christianity and the Cyrillic alphabet, and in many ways have been a cultural birth place for everything Slavic, especially east Slavic, but also for all Slavic peoples. I also would love to visit Russia because its the biggest and most powerful Slavic country. They have not only had a big influence on eastern and central Europe, but on the whole world. Im also a big fan of Vladimir Putin and I would like to see his country first hand :). What about you?

    What Slavic languages are your favorite? (again besides your own)

    So for me I like all Slavic languages but some for different reasons. For me Czech is the cutest language, I love how girls sound when they speak it, and they seem to sing all the time which makes it kind of happy and fun. I also like Serbian and Croatian because it kind of has a cool rhythm, and its very similar to Slovak in a way. Lastly I really like the Russian language. Its a language with a massive literary history, can sound poetic, profound, and pretty bad ass when used by the right person :). So Russian is definitely a language I'd love to learn one day.

    So that's all for me, what about you guys? I'm curious to hear about all of you and I hope you'll all participate in this thread :)