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What are you listening to? [list]

edited July 3 in Music
I presume you're already familiar with these types of threads - you're supposed to post a link to a song you're currently listening to, but most of the times you just think "Oh, this song is cool and/or interesting! Let's post it for others to hear!" Of course, since this is the Bulgarian sub-board, the twist here is the focus of the thread to be Bulgarian music mostly. And since I'm opening the thread (and wouldn't be surprised if I'm the only poster for awhile), I'll start with a salvo of various Bulgarian songs from different styles that I like.

Folk
There already is such a thread here, so I'll start with a quick orchestrated dance from my region:


And since we're on a folk wave...

Pop
This song is possibly this year's main pop hit in Bulgaria. It's an old folk song from Aegean Macedonia, performed by the 17 year old Dimana Mircheva (Dia) in a modernized style ("trap", to be precise, though I have no idea what that actually entails) after she received the inspiration to make such a modern mix in a dream.


Ok, from new school we go to old school and my favourite types of music...

Old-school rock
Shturcite (Щурците/The Crickets) are undoubtedly our most famous rock band of old, closely followed by Signal and FSB. I'm likely to post something from those groups later on, but I'd like to start with Tangra - Olovniat voynik (The Tin Soldier)


And from old back to the new...

Modern rock
The most popular modern rock band in Bulgaria is surely B.T.R. and their most classical hits are the balladic Spasenie (Salvation), Elmaz i staklo (Diamond and glass) and the more energetic Tsvete ot Lunata (Flower from the Moon). But I'll post a rather unknown, personal favourite of mine, one of their harder tracks: Dune (yes, dedicated to the Dune series of books, movies etc).


And from rock to... punk?

Punk
I'll start off with admitting that punk is generally not my style, but some of you might remember the legendary Gojko Mitic and eventually like this song about him...


Back on track - here comes metal.

Patriotic metal
Since nationalism is on the rise in these troubled days, I'll post the (probable) pioneers of patriotic metal in Bulgaria - Epizod. Particularly their most famous hit (O, Shipka), from their most famous album (Bulgarskiat Bog, The Bulgarian God). The album is interesting not only because it's arguably their best, but also because the lyrics of all the songs in it are actually original poems by some of our classicist authors, mostly ones by Ivan Vazov, including the following track based on his "Epopee of the forgotten" about the heroic last stand of the Russian troops and Bulgarian volunteers on Mount Shipka during the 1877-1878 war with the Turks.


And my favourite form of metal...

Folk metal
Unfortunately, there aren't that many folk metal bands in Bulgaria, but Balkandji make up for that by being possibly my favourite folk metal band from any country. Then again, maybe I'm biased...


And now, for something not so completely different...

Music for the soul
This type of music has been called with several names (world music, ambient, ethnic music and whatnot) and even spans several genres, so I just call it "music for the soul". I love it quite a lot, especially when they entwine the Bulgarian (and Balkan, some of them even Oriental) folk legacy with a deep, earthly feeling of mysticism. Therefore, although I'm bound to post many more examples of this with time, I'll post two of them now, from two "bands" which share some members and a common spirit.
I'm starting with a live performance by Kayno Yesno Slonce of their song Vazpelo e pile (A bird is [has started] singing):

I'm finishing with Isihia's Chernomen, which is actually not a song, but a narration by actor Vasil Mihaylov on Middle Bulgarian (i.e. the Bulgarian language spoken in the 14th century), reciting part of the text by Monk Isaiah from 1371 about the battle of Chernomen/Maritsa, which some call the first and last Orthodox crusade, by the Serbian despots Vukashin and Ugljesha against the Turks.

So, what are you listening to? Or what would you like to?
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Comments

  • edited October 2015
    The Isihiya video seemed interesting, with the wonderful medieval melody and Old (Bulgarian) Slavic narration. I was curious and saw to check out more of the group. They're really good, the blend of Byzantine chants and traditional metrics is truly confound. I would strongly recommend them, they're really close to the dark-folk/avant-garde Orthodox rock groups extremely popular in Macedonia. Thanks for the post. Best regards.
  • edited October 2015
    https://youtube.com/watch?v=1ce3iBuDrcs

    Last Hope from Sofia
    I love the reception Hardcore Punk is getting on the Balkans in general. For example Macedonian bands are getting great feedback from the Serbian, Bulgarian and even the Greek hardcore community. And that works the other way around as well.
  • edited October 2015
    Too much vocals too little zhica.
  • edited October 2016
    Nice, keep it coming, guys!

    But since I'm still getting drawn towards the folk-mix sound, here's a compromise from me - an instrumental track based on the Revival/medieval song "Otkoga se e mila moya mayno lyo" (I love it ever since the Tzar soundtrack)
  • Ok, back to something softer - perhaps my favourite Isihia track:
  • Isihija are such a great band, I really love their work.

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=HDK0-hB8y64

  • scandinavian doom metal time:
  • edited November 2015
    I've been stuck on Thomas Bergersen/Two Steps From Hell's BG tracks lately and this clip is just too impressive not to post:


    P.S. Does anyone here, by chance, have any good medieval-like music from Serbia or Croatia? Or instrumental folk tracks on traditional instruments (Serbian guslars, f.e., are quite famous)?
  • @NikeBG, there are numerous tracks available that are easy to find from guslar singers in Srbija and other jugo lands but I have been trying to find something similar to your beautiful Isihija. Unfortunately, in former jugoslavija, we have spent the last three decades singing govan like Kondorov Let.
  • Smallman are a Bulgarian band I quite like. They're prog-rock with folk elements.



  • edited December 2015
    @kruno - Kondorov Let (Flight of the Condor?). Is that some band or something? Searching for it in YT only gives me the classic Peruvian tune.
    As for guslar songs - I particularly need either instrumental tracks or songs whose lyrics can fit for the early medieval period (I'm gather some South Slavic music for one game mod set in the 9th-11th c., so obviously no mentions of Turks, guns or even Nemanjics). General folk songs and tunes are fine too, as long as they don't obviously use modern instruments like accordions, brass bands etc. In any case, I've received some recommendations from a couple of Serbian friends so far, but Croatia is particularly lacking in this regard...

    Oh, and to stay on-topic (and, yes, Smallman are cool, I particularly like their version of the Kayno Yesno Slonce track I've listed in the OP), the last BG track I listened to was probably this:
  • Not really a song, but I just re-watched this clip and thought I'd post it here as well, as it's a very nice gesture from the Polish diplomats in Sofia reciting a poem by our most famous revolutionary poet for this year's 3rd of March (our Liberation Day):

  • GLKGLK
    edited October 2016
    I'm a big fan of New Wave music, especially from the Balkans.
  • who doesn't love Dzhena? is she a real life bulgarian goddess?


  • I haven't opened the clip yet, but I presume she's a chalga singer, yes?
  • @NikeBG How popular is this turbo-folk (or whatever you call it) in Bulgaria?
  • edited October 2016
    Let's say it's enough to divide the nation - there are plenty who hate it (especially the intelligentsia, or the people who try to look like intelligentsia) and there are plenty who love it (not only peasants, apparently). Still, I'm not sure how close modern chalga is to turbo-folk. Perhaps some of the chalga classics from the 90s are more similar?

    This guy, btw, is currently a candidate for vice-president (with this guy being his president). :smiley: 


    P.S. Since I'm getting a bit nostalgic, here's a greeting for @Sviatogor with another classic!

  • @NikeBG turbo-folk evolved too, they call themselves pop now, sounds more or less like this Džena. Serbian, Bulgarian, Greek and Romanian singers of that genre often use same matrix for their songs.
    Melody of the song you posted for Sviatogor reminds me of hit song by Omega (Hungarian rock band), Gyöngyhajú lány (pearl-haired girl).
  • edited October 2016
    Before, Turbo folk was singing about sluts and whores. Now it's the sluts and whores sing.
    I miss the beforetimes.

    It had to be done:



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