Attention Slavorum Scholars! Call for Manuscripts in Ukrainian, Polish, and Lithuanian Studies

Academic Studies Press (ASP) invites manuscripts for its series in Slavic Studies – now including Ukrainian, Polish, and Lithuanian Studies! These new book series are edited by Vitaly Chernetsky, Halina Filipowicz, and Darius Staulinas respectively. ASP is an independent academic press, dedicated to promoting knowledge of Slavic, East European, and Central Asian studies, and is run by scholars for scholars.

This Ukrainian ASP author just won an award. "From the Bible to Shakespeare" announced as Winner of the 2017 American Association for Ukrainian Studies Best Book in Language, Literature, and Culture
Danylenko Author Photojpg

The American Association for Ukrainian Studies has announced Andrii Danylenko (Pace University) as this year's recipient of the AAUS Best Book in Language, Literature, and Culture for his volume From the Bible to Shakespeare: Pantelejmon Kuliš (1819–97) and the Formation of Literary Ukrainian (Academic Studies Press, 2016).


POLISH STUDIES

This series welcomes proposals in Polish studies, including literature, film, performance studies, gender and women's studies, cultural and intellectual history, folklore, and critical theory. Open to different methodological approaches, interpretive perspectives, and historical frameworks, the series is designed to showcase the richness of Polish studies in the twenty-first century. It aims to offer new interpretations of familiar texts and practices; to take roads less traveled in Polish studies to look for fresh insights and extend available knowledge about a complex and controversial culture; to chart new directions in scholarship on Polish topics; and to open up cutting-edge interdisciplinary and comparative perspectives. Series Editor: Halina Filipowicz (University of Wisconsin, Madison) 

UKRAINIAN STUDIES

This series publishes scholarly monographs and edited multi-authored volumes in Ukrainian studies with a strong emphasis in the humanities, including literature, film and media studies, gender studies, history, intellectual history, cultural studies, art history, the performing arts, folklore, and musicology. It welcomes traditional approaches and methodologies as well as new and innovative frameworks that experiment with scholarly forms to meet the demands and richness of twenty-first century Ukrainian studies.

This series also publishes translations of the best Ukrainian poetry and prose not previously available in English. Carving out new arenas in Ukrainian studies and developing and improving existing ones, this series publishes works that will be essential to scholars and students of Ukrainian studies for years to come. Series Editor: Vitaly Chernetsky (University of Kansas)

To Submit a Proposal

If you are interested in submitting a book proposal to ASP, please download and fill out our book proposal form as fully as possible, and email it to:

Oleh Kotsyuba, PhD
Slavic, East European, and Central Asian Studies
[email protected]

More information: http://www.academicstudiespress.com/for-authors/

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Comments

  • Very interesting academic journal article written in Ukrainian language, "1920: POLAND AND UKRAINE in the fight against the common enemy - SOVIET RUSSIA." https://www.academia.edu/30653328/1920_РІК_ПОЛЬЩА_І_УКРАЇНА_У_БОРОТЬБІ_ПРОТИ_СПІЛЬНОГО_ВОРОГА_РАДЯНСЬКОЇ_РОСІЇ

    Abstract:

    Having been defeated in the struggle against «red» and «white» Russia, in late 1919 the Ukrainian 
    People’s Republic for some time had to step off the political arena. Its armed forces were partially 
    interned by Poles, partially were in guerilla raid in deep enemy’s rear. The resumption of the struggle 
    for the independence of Ukraine was related with the presence of foreign allies. Such ally became 
    only Poland. In April 1920 Ukraine had to sign with it difficult and unfair Warsaw treaties. The article 
    is devoted to the common struggle of the Polish Army and the Army of Ukrainian People’s Republic 
    against Soviet Russia. However, it did not bring the independence, having ended with signing of the 
    Peace of Riga, which divided Ukrainian lands between Warsaw and Moscow. 
  • Unfortunately, I can't view this PDF with my slow Internet, but I will check when it will temporarily speed up. I just want to add something to this abstract.


    It says about "difficult and unfair Warsaw treaties". I know about one treaty, but it's a detail - what is more important, is that treaties are not meant to be comfy for any side, while this sentence suggests that Poland gained everything, and Ukraine lost a lot. In reality, it was mainly solving an issue of territorial dispute, and both sides had to find a compromise - they did, Poland resigned from various lands (Poland wanted to regain full control over territories annexed by the Russian Empire in 1772) and Ukraine resigned from various lands. But most importantly, it not only ended the war between Poland and Ukraine - it also made an alliance between both countries. Also, Poland officially recognised People's Ukrainian Republic as an independent country.


    The Treaty of Riga, however, is morally not the best treaty that Poland could have ever signed. According to me at least. It was a violation of the Treaty of Warsaw, the representatives from People's Ukrainian Republic were not invited and Poland acknowledged the Ukrainian Soviet Republic as "Ukrainian delegature", which meant cancelling the recognition of People's Ukrainian Republic. There are few reasons why it happened. First is who was a member of Polish delegature: it were mainly the members of Endecja, which is National Democracy (Narodowa Demokracja) - created by Roman Dmowski, main political and ideological opponent of Józef Piłsudski. Dmowski believed in creating a national state, he cheered for polonization of Belarusians and Ukrainians. Also, during World War I, he was preaching for allying with Russia and fighting against the Central Powers - Piłsudski did the opposite. Endecja during these peace talks did not wanted to help in creating independent Ukraine, as they wanted to incorporate more lands to Poland, and they believed that independent Ukraine will sooner or later ally with the Germans and be against Poland again. Well, this part they predicted correctly, in a way. However, they also believed that communist government - bolsheviks - are a temporary issue and soon "the whites" will regain control over Russia. And then Poland and Russian Empire could ally against the Germans. This didn't happened.


    As a result Ukraine didn't regained official independence and was divided between Poland and the Soviet Union. However, the Treaty of Riga was not something that Piłsudski was happy about, since it put an end on his concept of federation. Even some members of National Democracy were unhappy, some supporters of Trotsky in the Soviet Union, obviously the Ukrainians, and the only who was rather happy were common people, who noted mainly one thing: the war is over.


    The Treaty of Warsaw itself, which was mentioned as some devastating necessity for Ukrainians could have been an actual symbol of Polish-Ukrainian friendship, which nowadays doesn't exist. Unfortunately, the Peace of Riga sort of destroyed that concept.

  • edited June 18
    Why are you promoting a bunch of traitors trying to subvert and re-write Slavic history, folklore, culture by inserting Cultural Marxist distortions to poison the minds of our people? You should all be disgusted with yourselves.
  • edited June 18
    @gaiuscoriolanus Thank you for the detailed commentary! I am very interested in this period of history because some of my ancestors went back to visit and were detained because of the Civil War. You explained this very well. If you wrote a book, I would buy it! 

    @mavka ;
    Why are you promoting a bunch of traitors trying to subvert and re-write Slavic history, folklore, culture by inserting Cultural Marxist distortions to poison the minds of our people? You should all be disgusted with yourselves.

    Okay, then you write a book with the correct and accurate information. 

  • @Karpivna

     I am very interested in this period of history because some of my ancestors went back to visit and were detained because of the Civil War.

    In which years? :) There was no civil war per se, I guess one of the other conflicts? 
  • @GaiusCoriolanus 1916-1923 I call this period of Civil Unrest in Eastern Poland/Western Ukraine a "Civil War." What is the accurate term?
  • edited June 18
    We only have a term for years 1918-1939 and call it Interwar period. If your ancestors came in 1916, then it was during World War I - so depending on the region the country [officially] which they entered may vary. But after the ending of that war, other conflicts took place in this region. And these conflicts were not helpful for newly-born Second Republic of Poland in creating whole law and administration that could work properly from the very beginning :D So I guess the wars and general problems with administration have prolonged the visit of your ancestors ;)

    What kind of mess was here right after regaining independence is the fact, that we had 4 different currencies until 1920 and four years later another reform took place. Ah, and we had two different railroad systems. :)


  • edited June 18
    >The resumption of the struggle for the independence of Ukraine was related with the presence of foreign allies. Such ally became only Poland.

    Poland became an ally of Ukraine in 1919? Half of Ukraine lost its independence to Poland. The other half lost its independence to Bolshevik Russia. If Bolshevik Russia gave republic to Ukraine, then Poland built a unitarian state closing Ukrainian universities, schools, Orthodox churches. The press was banned in Ukrainian language. There were ethnic tensions between Poles and Ukrainians as a result between 1921-1939. It eventuated to Volyn messacre during the war in 1940s. On the hand Kremlin authorities were responsible for Holodomor in other hal of Ukraine in 1932-1933. Ukraine didn't have allies during interwar period.

  • Poland became an ally of Ukraine in 1919?


    Yes.


  • edited June 18
    If there was an ally to Ukraine, then it would be Germany who helped Ukraine to gain  independence from Russia in 1918 after Brest-Litovsk treaty.
    ---
    In the treaty, Bolshevik Russia ceded the Baltic States to Germany; they were meant to become German vassal states under German princelings.[2] Russia also ceded its province of Kars Oblast in the South Caucasus to the Ottoman Empire and recognized the independence of Ukraine.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Brest-Litovsk

  • @Sviatogor, it's about another war.
  • edited June 18
    @GaiusCoriolanus

    Poland was not an ally of Ukraine. Poland had its own political interests. Such articles claiming Poland was an ally appeared recently due conflict between Russia and Ukraine. Germany was not an ally either. Germans, Austrians wanted to split the Russian empire after WWI helping Ukraine and Belarus to establish  their independent states.
  • Poland was not an ally of Ukraine.

    Poland was an ally of Ukraine.


    Poland had its own political interests.

    Of course. Why shouldn't Poland have own interests? O_o


    Such articles claiming Poland was an ally appeared recently due conflict between Russia and Ukraine.

    Such articles exist since the Interwar period. It appeared recently to you personally, because you weren't informed before.





  • edited June 18
    How can Poland be an ally of Ukraine while being responsible for the disolution of independent Ukrainian republic closing Ukrainian schools, Universities, churches, cultural centres, banning press in Ukrainian language? Poland pursued its own political goals.
  • @GaiusCoriolanus

    Maybe I am not informed about the situation. It's difficult to imagine Poland being an ally of Ukraine in 1919 after what Polish authorities have done in Ukraine.
  • How can Poland be an ally of Ukraine

    By signing the military pact? I think you may see no difference between being an ally and being a friend. Alliances are made two sides share same goals, Poland and Ukraine shared that goal back then.


    while being responsible for the disolution of independent Ukrainian republic

    I wrote about that in my first post in this thread.


    closing Ukrainian schools, Universities, churches, cultural centres, banning press in Ukrainian language? Poland pursued its own political goals.

    It didn't happened without a reason. In 1920 there were 3000 of Ukrainian schools. The problem is that in 1929 one particular organization have been found, known as OUN (e.g. responsible for the assassination of Polish vice prime minister). The places mentioned by you were both: a way to decrease the influence of the organisation that was considered a terrorist organisation. But certainly there was also a bit of "an eye for an eye" in that. Which is also logical, especially in 20th century.

    The problem in your way of thinking is that you try so hard to describe Second Republic of Poland as some kind of xenophobic monster, while you completely ignore the reasons behind certain actions. Same with how you try to depict Piłsudski. Generally what you're doing is somehing like a dialogue between Poland and Belarusians and Ukrainians that may look like this:

    PL: Hey guys, there is a guy known as Piłsudski here. He has a proposal to create a federation of countries between Germany and Soviet Union so we can resist any potential threat from both. Every nation would be governing itself so no one feels discriminated. Together we stand, divided we fall.

    UA: Fck you! Imperialists! Go away!

    BY: Suka, pashol von! We don't want to!

    And then the Soviets come. The opponents of Piłsudski are responsible for the shape of the Treaty of Riga, which is basically a way to implement the ideology of Piłsudski's opposition known as Endecja - big fans of polonisation and such stuff. 

    UA: Piłsudski is evil, he didn't helped us!

    BY: Da! He didn't, vile monster!

    Ukrainians then found the OUN, which is a threat to the stability in Poland. Belarusians on the other hand start to preach communist ideology and turn more toward the Soviets.

    And you wonder why the schools and universities were closed. Why do you expect Poland to be some kind of charity organisation, which will accept the punch in the face but still will want to help? It's obvious that action leads to the reaction. 


    Maybe I am not informed about the situation. It's difficult to imagine Poland being an ally of Ukraine in 1919 after what Polish authorities have done in Ukraine.

    Like, for example, preventing "Polish half" of Ukraine from experiencing Holodomor?

  • edited June 18
    @GaiusCoriolanus

    Holodomor happened in southern Russia and northern Kazakhstan too. So the Gulag and collectivisation. And mass execution in 1937-1938. But the opression in western Ukraine, western Belarus, eastern Lithuania also happened. The conflict in Volyn happened for a reason. In western Belarus there were also ethnic tensions between Belarusians and Poles. The second Polish republic was xenophobic. This is such a vast subject I don't know where to begin.Here's an example


    A memo of magistrate of Bialystok Ostaszewski to the ministry of internal affairs of Poland titled as "Problems of strengthening the Polish holding position in Białystok Voivodeship": (Translation. You can search for the original source yourself.)

    "Sooner or later , the Belarusian population will be polonised. They represent a passive crowd without broad national consciousness, without their own state traditions. Wanting to speed this process, we must overcome the ancient Belarusian culture. In townships where Belarusians live culture should certainly raised to a higher level of material culture of Poles. This is one basic principle of Polish expansion. To put it briefly, our attitude towards the Belarusians can be formulated as follows : we want and insist that this ethnic minority thought as Poles — not to give anything in return and not doing anything in a different way".

    ----

    Similar attitudes were in western Ukraine and eastern Lithuania. And you are telling me Poland was not xenophobic? Sure, it was. Once again ethnic conflicts in Volyn, western Belarus, eastern Lithuania happened for a reason.
  • @Sviatogor

    Holodomor happened in southern Russia and northern Kazakhstan.

    From Wikipedia:

    "The Holodomor (Ukrainian: Голодомо́р)[a] was a man-made famine in Soviet Ukraine in 1932 and 1933 that killed an officially estimated 7 million to 10 million people[11] (other estimates range as low as 2.5 million or as high as 12 million). It was part of the wider Soviet famine of 1932–33, which affected the major grain-producing areas of the country.

    During the Holodomor millions of inhabitants of Ukraine, the majority of whom were ethnic Ukrainians, died of starvation in a peacetime catastrophe unprecedented in the history of Ukraine.[12] Since 2006, the Holodomor has been recognized by Ukraine[13] and 15 other countries as a genocide of the Ukrainian people carried out by the Soviet government.[14]"


    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/90/Ukraine_famine_map.png/800px-Ukraine_famine_map.png

    Yeah, Russia and Kazakhstan as fck. 


    But the opression in western Ukraine, western Belarus, eastern Lithuania. The conflict in Volyn happened for a reason. In western Belarus there were also ethnic tensions between Belarusians and Poles. The second Polish republic was xenophobic.
    Similar attitudes were in western Ukraine and eastern Lithuania. And you are telling me Poland was not xenophobic? Sure, they were. Once again ethnic conflict in Volyn, western Belarus, eastern Lithuania happened for a reason.

    Can you please read my post as a whole for once? What you present as a reason is a result. Since you are unwilling to read my post and you ignore important parts constantly repeating your fairytale, I will be lazy too and just copy and paste what I wrote:

    "It didn't happened without a reason. In 1920 there were 3000 of Ukrainian schools. The problem is that in 1929 one particular organization have been found, known as OUN (e.g. responsible for the assassination of Polish vice prime minister). The places mentioned by you were both: a way to decrease the influence of the organisation that was considered a terrorist organisation. But certainly there was also a bit of "an eye for an eye" in that. Which is also logical, especially in 20th century.


    The problem in your way of thinking is that you try so hard to describe Second Republic of Poland as some kind of xenophobic monster, while you completely ignore the reasons behind certain actions. Same with how you try to depict Piłsudski. Generally what you're doing is somehing like a dialogue between Poland and Belarusians and Ukrainians that may look like this:

    PL: Hey guys, there is a guy known as Piłsudski here. He has a proposal to create a federation of countries between Germany and Soviet Union so we can resist any potential threat from both. Every nation would be governing itself so no one feels discriminated. Together we stand, divided we fall.

    UA: Fck you! Imperialists! Go away!

    BY: Suka, pashol von! We don't want to!

    And then the Soviets come. The opponents of Piłsudski are responsible for the shape of the Treaty of Riga, which is basically a way to implement the ideology of Piłsudski's opposition known as Endecja - big fans of polonisation and such stuff. 

    UA: Piłsudski is evil, he didn't helped us!

    BY: Da! He didn't, vile monster!

    Ukrainians then found the OUN, which is a threat to the stability in Poland. Belarusians on the other hand start to preach communist ideology and turn more toward the Soviets.

    And you wonder why the schools and universities were closed. Why do you expect Poland to be some kind of charity organisation, which will accept the punch in the face but still will want to help? It's obvious that action leads to the reaction. "


    A memo of magistrate of Bialystok Ostaszewski to the ministry of internal affairs of Poland titled as "Problems of strengthening the Polish holding position in Białystok Voivodeship": (Translation. You can search for the original source yourself.)

    "Sooner or later , the Belarusian population will be polonised. They represent a passive crowd without broad national consciousness, without their own state traditions. Wanting to speed this process, we must overcome the ancient Belarusian culture. In townships where Belarusians live culture should certainly raised to a higher level of material culture of Poles. This is one basic principle of Polish expansion. To put it briefly, our attitude towards the Belarusians can be formulated as follows : we want and insist that this ethnic minority thought as Poles — not to give anything in return and not doing anything in a different way".


    I have no idea who is that guy, plus I cannot find the source since you gave the translation without its original name. I'm only curious about his political sympathies and when he wrote that.








  • @GaiusCoriolanus

    Russia lost more people to famine than Ukraine. Famine was targeted at a social class rather than a certain ethnicity. All people of USSR were affected in one way or another in 1932-1933.


    I read you posts. I don't care for the reasons of Polish authorities actions. I don't think anyone cares in Ukraine, Belarus, Lithuania. Polish authorities closed everything they could in people's very own home. Imagine Germany came to Poland shutting Polish schools, churches, literature. Don't spread nonsense about Belarusians gravitating towards Soviets. Western Belarusians and western Ukrainians wanted to join Belarusian Republic and Ukrainian republic. Lithuanians of Vilnius region wanted to join Lithuania. That's how much Polish authority was disliked in 1921-1939.


    For your information western Ukrainians were greeting Soviets with flowers in 1939. They were russophiles. Russophiles of Galicia.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russophiles_of_Galicia

    It is not difficult to search for magistrate of Bialystok voivodship Ostaszewski who wrote a memo to the minister of Poland.
  • I don't care for the reasons of Polish authorities actions.

    If you don't care abuot what the other side is saying, there's no point in any discussion at all.

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