Uncushioned Capitalism and Nationalism in Eastern Europe

Uncushioned Capitalism and Nationalism in Eastern Europe

edited January 10 in Politics
An interesting article in Deutsche Welle about reasons for the rise of nationalism in Eastern Europe. 

http://www.dw.com/en/rising-nationalism-and-the-eus-split-with-the-east/a-42073959
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Comments

  • The EU is a plague and everything they stand for is cancer.
  • And Austria is not...
  • Capitalism is the only true way to the future.  The EU is increasingly trying to control things and force the already admittedly failed experiment of multiculturalism upon the East.  Is that a good thing?  No is the answer.
  • Capitalism is likewise cancer (and it's one of the things the EU stands for). Multiculturalism and socialism are both caused by and directly related to capitalism.
  • @aaaaa
    I know people from Western EU countries who want socialism and hate capitalism.  I promise you, making our own way involves capitalism because it is the purest form of promoting one's own ways.  Socialism and multiculturalism are adopted from our former rulers who wanted to destroy our identities and replace it with "Soviet Socialist" or simply "Communist".  I am a capitalist because it allows for independence from the state and a way to prove the greatness of the minds of the narod.
  • I just read the article below an hour ago and then I see this topic on Slavorum. Weird.  :D Will Poland, Slovakia, Hungary and Czech Republic destroy the EU?

    Best columns: Europe

    Poland: A showdown with the EU


    Kaczynski: Can he beat Brussels?

    Democracy is in retreat in Poland, said Adam Szostkiewicz in Polityka (Poland). Less than three decades after we threw off the yoke of Communist rule, Poland again faces the possibility of a single party wielding total power over all aspects of the state—including the judiciary. The ruling Law and Justice party appears to share the Communists’ belief that “judges should serve the party and be controlled by the authorities.” Sweeping legislation passed last month will force the retirement of all Supreme Court justices ages 65 and over—a criterion met by nearly half of the court’s 86 judges, including its president, Malgorzata Gersdorf, an outspoken critic of the government. The Law and Justice–dominated legislature will then pick their replacements. It’s just the latest in a series of “authoritarian attacks on civil rights and freedoms” by this government. A TV network, for example, was recently fined for covering an opposition protest. Is democracy dying here? Or is it already dead?

    This judicial takeover represents an existential crisis for the European Union—one far worse than Brexit, said Bernd Riegert in Germany’s DW.com. Unlike the U.K., Poland doesn’t want to leave the union. Instead it wants to flout the bloc’s founding values—such as respect for the rule of law—while reaping the benefits of membership. And Poland’s close allies Hungary, Slovakia, and the Czech Republic want the same thing; they just haven’t gone as far yet. This year will be a turning point for the 28-nation union. If the bloc lets the nationalists get away with such flagrant rule breaking, “the EU in its present form will be at an end.”

    That’s why the EU is taking the sternest possible measures, said Le Monde (France) in an editorial. The bloc has for the first time unleashed its “nuclear option,” invoking Article 7 of its founding treaty, by which it can discipline errant members. Brussels has given Warsaw three months to change its judicial laws or face a vote in the EU’s Council of Ministers that could strip Poland of its EU voting rights. The catch? The vote in the Council of Ministers must be unanimous, and Hungary—itself heading down the path of authoritarianism—has already said it will veto any censure of Poland. But there’s another way the EU could punish Poland: withholding or delaying some of the roughly $12 billion in EU funds it receives each year. That “would certainly be felt in Warsaw.”

    “Let’s hope the EU isn’t just bluffing,” said Stanislaw Skarzynski in Gazeta Wyborcza(Poland). Law and Justice leader Jaroslaw Kaczynski views the EU as a threat to the nation-state and has been dreaming of this showdown since his party took power for the first time in 2005, just a year after Poland joined the bloc. If the EU folds to the Law and Justice power grab, “advocates of Polish democracy will lose their faith, not only in their own judiciary but also in the seriousness, authority, and political instincts of EU leaders.”

    THE WEEK

    January 12, 2018
  • edited January 10
    MikhailA Capitalism needs socialist policies to keep the lid on the pressure cooker from flying off.
    If you let the market self-regulate for long enough you'll have a revolution on your hands.
    Likewise, multiculturalism and globalism is caused by the desire to expand markets, because constant expansion is necessary for sustained growth.
  • @aaaaa
    I understand what you are saying.  It is quite the problem...and I understand entirely now.
  • @Karpivna ;
    Will Poland, Slovakia, Hungary and Czech Republic destroy the EU?
    We don't need Poland, Hungary and Czechia to do it. >:)
  • @Kapitán Denis  Slovakia taking the EU hostage.  :o

    Image result for slovakia destroying the EU
  • I'd hit it.
  • edited January 10
    @Karpivna Where is that pic originally from? :o
  • edited January 10
    @Karpivna, @Kapitán Denis

    EU was doomed the very moment they went beyond the EEC concept.

    The thing is, nobody ever really figured out how to incorporate common global (or regional) interest with preserving everybody's cultural autonomy. Everybody always kind of goes along, hoping things will work themselves out, but they never do. Examples: Polish Commonwealth, Austro-Hungary, socialism in Eastern Europe, Yugoslavia, etc. US tried it with confederacy of 13 colonies for 6 years (1783-1789). They were utterly failing until they reset with what is essentially  centralized unitarist constitution.
  • @Kapitán Denis

    Slovakia taking the EU hostage.  o
    I don't get it. What's EU about her?



  • edited January 10
    @Kapitán Denis The photo is from an article about the rise of European Fascism. https://newrepublic.com/article/144954/return-fascism-germany-greece-far-right-nationalists-winning-elections

    Caption for photo. SLOVAKIA Far-right nationalists stage a mock kidnapping to dramatize how the European Union has taken Slovakia hostage. In response to the migrant crisis, the EU required its member states to accept refugees—a move that has sparked a fierce anti-Muslim backlash.

    @balkanizer ;
    Nothing, really.  :D
  • I don't blame Central Europe for being angry with the EU. 

    'It's food racism!' New scandal erupts in the EU over NUTELLA

    Political divisions have emerged within the European Union, but this time fuelled by alleged differences in Nutella, waffles and sausages. 

    Slovaks, Poles, Czech and the Hungarians have accused companies of ‘food racism’ after tests claimed branded products were of poorer qualities in their countries when compared to western Europe. 

    The Hungarian food safety authority NEBIH recently compared 23 products sold in Hungary and Austria by discount supermarkets such as Aldi ad Lidl. 

    They found the Hungarian version of Manner waffles were less crispy, and chocolate spread Nutella was not as creamy as what was being in its neighbouring country, researchers claimed. 

    And the Slovakian Ministry of Agriculture found differences in 22 named products, including less meat but more fat and liquid in sausages, when compared to the same brand in western Europe. 

    https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/775791/food-racism-EU-European-Union-Nutella-supermarket-eastern-quality

  • edited January 11
    To me, the saddest in all of this is that Hungarians, with some of the most fertile land in all of Europe, find it more financially sensible to import food.
  • edited January 11
    I ate Nutella pancakes today. :|

    BTW, I don't like shopping in Lidl. It's always full of people with tons of products in their shopping carts and max 2 of 7 or 8 awry cash registers open. I just want to buy 2 or 3 things and it literally takes ~15 minutes before I finally get out of the shop.

    It's cool that our politicians are worried about the quality of products imported to Slovakia, but they're still dickheads. All of them.
    The political situation in Slovakia has been among the worst in Europe since forever.
    For example, highways. They're "building" highways since 60's and they're still not built. Everyone has a problem with everything. From project managers to workers to politicians. Recently they said in the TV news that they're not going to build a single meter of highways in 2018 for some reason. :D
    This is a map of highways in Slovakia:
    httpsuploadwikimediaorgwikipediacommonsthumb556Highways_in_Slovakiasvg1024px-Highways_in_Slovakiasvgpng
    The construction of the most important highway, the D1 highway (Bratislava > Trnava > Trenčín > Žilina > Prešov > Košice > Ukraine) started in 1972. The comrades said that the supposed year of completion would be 1990. Of course it wasn't.
    After the fall of Czecho-Slovakia in 1993 the bullshitting continued. Every ruling party, every prime minister and every minister of transport since then to this day promised it's gonna be finished in 2-5 years. And the bullshitting still continues. :D
    At least the majority of roads is finished. ;) It's not just a shame on the international level, but also on the national level.

    But why does it take so long? Politicians accuse each other of money tunneling. Every politician gets rich and nothing positive is being done. Every 3-5 months we hear about some fraud on the TV news. Politicians often do businesses with shell companies (we call them mailbox companies, because everything they have is just a mailbox :D) with headquarters on Cyprus. What they do is called fascism. But nobody says it that way. The only political party that everyone openly calls fascist is ĽSNS because of symbolism and their looks. It's sad.

    And this is how basically everything "works" in Slovakia. From education to healthcare system. There was a scandal about a purchase of an overpriced CT scanner. The price was hundreds of thousands Euros higher. :D

    If I had to write a book about everything negative in Slovak politics, it would have more than 50 volumes. And if I wrote about everything positive in Slovak politics, all the accomplishments, all the successful projects and positive changes, it would be in a format of a brochure. :D
  • @Kapitán Denis
    It sounds to me like the same people who run the country simply change party names and continue their usual business.  Sounds like the American Republicans and Democrats when they switched party names and became the modern parties in the US that rule in that country today.
  • @MikhailA Yea, it's a known fact that many of them are enemies in politics, but friends in real life. They constantly argue in political debates on the TV, but they go out for a coffee together. :D
    Smer has been the ruling party (or the most powerful one) in the recent years and many people hate them. It's always a time to change it and kick them out, but it fails every time. A Hungarian party called Most-Híd (which means Bridge-Bridge in Slovak and Magyar) promised they will never do politics with Smer and many people voted them because of that. After the elections they created the government together. :D Slovaks are mostly good people, I would say, but never ever trust a Slovak politician. They're born liars.
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