#352869

Anonymous

srdceleva You are absolutely right. I remember reading about it in “London for immigrant suckers”. Here is an extract:
“…Samo Tomasik, a Slovakian romantic poet, decided to book a weekend break in Prague sometime during 1834. As he was peacefully walking on the streets of Prague, minding his own business, he suddenly felt alienated and he needed an emergency landing at a bar table. Tomasik sat down and decided that something had to be changed. What had caused his upset was the fact that the German language was spoken more than Czech in Prague. Under a strong feeling of patriotism and rational fear of complete Germanization; to the music of the old Polish song “Jeszcze Polska Nie Zginela” he wrote the lyrics of “Hey Slovaci”. During the First World War, “Hey Slovaci” was sung by all Slavs recruited in Austria’s Army … In the Second World War, it became the temporary national anthem of Yugoslavia, under the name “Hej Sloveni”. Because of its popularity among the masses, the anthem was upgraded from a temporarily status to a permanent one”