#355128

Anonymous

Double-cross symbolized Slovakia (or Slovak counties) in the Kingdom of Hungary. It stands on three mountains Tatra, Matra, Fatra (Slovakia is a mountainous land, while Hungary is mostly lowland).

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Coat of arms of the Kingdom of Hungary consists of 8 parts. In the middle there is a basic part which consists of Arpad's stripes (rivers Danube, Tisa, Drava, Sava) and double-cross on three mountains (Tatra, Matra, Fatra). The left side symbolizes today's Hungary (lowland) and the right side represents today's Slovakia (highland). Top left – Dalmatia; top right – Croatia; in the centre to left – Slavonia; in the centre to right – Transylvania; bottom left – Bosnia; bottom right – Rijeka (Fiume).
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Kings, dukes and aristocrats who used to use double-cross, had mostly something to do with Slovaks and Slovakia. For example, the most well-known king of the Kingdom of Hungary Stephen I. used double-cross, because he was originally duke of <a href="http://www.slavorum.com/index.php?topic=546.0">Nitrian principality</a> in 995-997, moreover Slovak aristocrats Hunt and Poznan helped him to beat Magyar nobleman Koppány. Three mountains Tatra, Matra, Fatra were added to the coat-of-arms when Czech king Wenceslaus III Premyslid became king of Slovak lands of the Kingdom after the year 1300.

The Battle of Rozhanovce
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This battle was fought between King Charles I of Hungary and the family of Palatine Amade Aba + major domestic opponent of king Mate Csak on June 15, 1312. After the Arpad dynasty died out in 1301, the succession to the throne of the Kingdom of Hungary became contested. The Pope's champion, Charles Robert of Anjou, finally drove his foreign opponents out of the country and was crowned in 1310. However, his rule remained nominal in many parts of the Kingdom because several powerful magnates still did not recognize him as the king. King's chief adversary was Mate Csak, who controlled 14 counties in western and north parts of the Hungarian Kingdom. He allied himself with the Aba family, who ruled eastern Hungarian Kingdom.
Counties controlled by Mate Csak and Aba family are more or less identical with Slovakia, that's why they use double-cross on three mountains (look at the bottom of picture), while King Charles I of Hungary uses Arpad's stripes for lowland Hungary (look at the top of picture).

In comparison with today's Hungary, indeed much more cities, towns and villages in Slovakia have double-cross in their coat-of-arms.
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