#358429

Anonymous
Quote:
Sounds like the identity crisis is more of an issue to those Rusyns living OUTSIDE of Ukraine…??? Hrm.

My great grandparents considered themselves as Rusyn but didn't pass anything on.. no language or culture.  But many Rusyns in the USA I talk to make it sound like the Rusyns in Ukraine are outraged by the fact they are not recognized…

During the nineteenth century a cultural and political debate arose among Ukrainians and others about their national status, in both Imperial Russia and Austro-Hungarian Galicia. The 'Russophiles', who saw Moscow and St. Petersburg as the centres of East Slavic culture considered themselves ethnic Little Russians (Malorossy), part of the "Russian" (i.e. East Slavic) people. The 'Old Ruthenians' in Galicia saw themselves as inheritors of the heritage of Kievan Rus’ through the Galician-Volhynian Kingdom. They stuck to the traditional self-appellation Ruthenians (Rusyny, as opposed to Russkije 'Russians', both words being cognates of Rus’).

Everyone's Great Grandparents or Great Great Grandparents would had considered themselves Rusyn / Ruthenian.
The whole name of Ukraine and Ukrainian identity didn't even become mainstream until the early 1920s. 

In that regard, this whole American Rusyn community is an abnormality of people who didn't accept the new Ukrainian identity. 

A lot of the Ukrainians in my family are Greek-Catholic, I guess that makes me an oppressed Rusyn. .  ;D

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