#404630

Anonymous

@Dušan – Serbian alphabet is far from a perfect script… Not just that it has digraphs, but also, phonemes are pronounced differently, depending on position – even in Cyrillic.

Take for example, the letter N (Н):
It can be either hard (/n/) or soft (/ŋ/) – (compare “n” in words like “nebo, ništa” and “n” in “Anka, banka, tenk,…”)
but then… say the word “senf”… in pronunciation of that word, there is no “n” at all…. it’s just that the “e” becomes a nasal vowel… /sf/…

Then, take, for example, words such as “stranputica”… pronounce this word and listen.. do you hear “n” in there? Also, “post-diplomski” – is there “t”, or even “s”? “t” is lost, and “d” becomes devocalized…

In the words, such as “svetski, hrvatski…” which have “ts”… do you pronounce them as separate sounds? as separate “t” and “s”?… I highly doubt you do… they’re pronounced as one “c”…

Then… the letter “k”… compare “kola, kuća” and “ker, kivi”… once again… it can be either hard (/k/), or soft (/c/)… same also goes with “t”… compare “telefon” and “pertla”… 
also “l”… in “lav” and “prilika”… 

many, many consonants have “hard” and “soft” forms… which are not distinguished in writing… but are clearly 2 different phonemes.. which are usually not distinguishable by native speakers, but only by outsiders… I like to call this phenomenon “micro-phonetics”… if you are familiar with IPA, you know that there are 2 types of IPA: “narrow” and “broad”… the “broad transcription” is used within one language, and doesn’t pay attention to “micro” phonetics, only “broadly” describes the sound.. which is enough for native speakers.. but not for outsiders… for outsiders, the “narrow transcription” is used, and it is extremely specific, and tells you exactly how to pronounce the sound…

If we are picky, we can find millions and millions of faults in Serbian alphabet… although, I haven’t even started with the vowels yet.. :smiley: