#432994

Anonymous

The Istrian Shorthaired Hound (FCI No. 151, original name is Istarski Kratkodlaki Gonič) is a breed of dog from Istria in Croatia, descended from a very old type of scenthound. The Istrian Shorthaired Hound is the slightly smaller counterpart to the longer coated Istrian Coarse-haired Hound from the same region.<br />There is no actual proof of great antiquity for today’s breed (such as written lineages going back to antiquity), although there is much fanciful conjecture. The type is very old, and the modern breed resembles images seen in frescoes as early as 1497. Writers cited as having mentioned the type include Bishop of Đakovo Petar Bakić in 1719 and the veterinarian Franjo Bertić, also of Đakovo, in 1859.[3] The old type is seen in the Posavaz Hound and the Istrian Coarsehaired Hound as well. The smooth and coarse-haired hounds were used for hunting in Istria (see the article on Motovun for photographs of the sort of mountainous terrain they were bred to hunt) while the Posavaz Hound is from the Sava Valley. The Istrian hounds are thought to be the oldest of the hound breeds in the Balkan region.<br />The Istrian Shorthaired Hound is still kept in its homeland and in nearby areas for hunting, not as a pet, and is especially valued for hunting fox and rabbit.

The Posavac Hound (FCI No. 154) (Croatian: posavski gonič) is a breed of dog, originating as a hunting dog of the scenthound type. Croatia is the home country for the breed. The name translates into English as the Scenthound From The Sava Valley, but is usually translated as the Posavac Hound.<br />here is no actual proof of great antiquity for this breed, although there is much fanciful conjecture. The type is very old, and the modern breed resembles images seen in frescoes as early as 1497. Writers cited as having mentioned the type include Bishop of Đakovo Petar Bakić in 1719 and the veterinarian Franjo Bertić, also of Đakovo, in 1859. Hounds from the Sava Valley (Posavina, south-east of Zagreb) were sold as boskini in Croatia in the 1800s. The ancestry of the dogs was documented starting in 1929, when registrations for the stud book were first taken. The breed was internationally recognised by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale in 1955, and the name was clarified in 1969. The breed has been known since then as the Posavac Hound.[2] The breed is recognised in North America by the United Kennel Club in the Scenthound Group, and by a number of minor registries, hunting clubs, and internet-based dog registry businesses, and is promoted as a rare breed for those seeking a unique pet.

The Istrian Coarse-haired Hound (Croatian: istarski oštrodlaki gonič, Slovene: istrski ostrodlaki gonič) is a dog breed from Croatia, developed in the mid-19th century for hunting fox and rabbit. It is a rough-coated scent hound still kept primarily as a hunting dog rather than as a pet.<br />Croatian and Slovene breeders created the Istrian Coarse-haired Hound in the mid-19th century by crossing the French Griffon Vendeén with the Istrian Shorthaired Hound, a smooth-haired hound developed from both sight hounds and scent hounds. The breed first took part in a conformation show in Vienna in 1866.

The dog is still used for hunting fox, rabbits, hare, and wild boar.