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  • #347150

    Anonymous

    I know, what a strange question that only I can answer. Here’s the thing: I’m in doubt. I always thought myself as of polish origin (I’m born and live in Brazil), but some new info may have changed my notion. My greatgrandfather was Constantine Bojko, born in modern-day Potrubowszczyzna (a little village just near the border of Poland and Belarus), in 1911 (not sure, but I think by that time, the region was under russian control). Some years later, he moved to Dereczyn, in modern Belarus. When he moved to Brazil, in 1930, he was a polish citizen, so I always identified him as polish. But as I found out, it’s more complicated. Not only he spoke russian (we have some letters from his mom to him in russian), he was a member of the Russian Orthodox Church and had a patronymic surname (Semenovich, son of Simon). Is it possible or likely that he was ethnically russian living in modern-day Poland? The whole orthodox thing with the patronymic really confuses me. There was any massive campaign of russification in the region to justify that?

    #388239

    Anonymous

    You are sure he wrote them in Russian or not just use cyrylic letters? Or maybe it was Ruthenian not Russian.

    #388241

    Anonymous

    The guy who translated the letters said it was Russian. I even remember that in one of the letters, my greatgreandfather’s brother-in-law calls him shurin, that is supposed to be a russian translation for brother-in-law.

    #388242

    Anonymous

    It is possible, as well as it is possible that he was either Belarusian or Ukrainian. Bojko is quite common Ukrainian surname.

    #388230

    Anonymous

    Also possible. For me, the polish origin thing seems farther and farther, mainly because of the religion.

    #388218
    Boris V.
    Boris V.
    Participant
    @dedushka

    I know a Boyko from Ukraine Crimea, but he is undecided if he is Russian or Ukrianian. He feels like both probably.

    #388226

    Anonymous

    @ghpedroso your grandfather was probably not a Pole.

    #388215

    Anonymous

    If he was from a village, then he was most likely Belarusian. Belarusian were eastern Orthodox and russified especially when it came
    to writing. Boyko is common western Belarusian surname. Boyko is
    not a Russian surname. Belarusians used patrynomic names. Few Russians lived in western Belarus / eastern Poland (Grodno governate) during those times, especially in rural areas. In general , Poles were Roman Catholic. Potrubowszczyzna village is 20-30km from Grodno city , north-western Belarus (border of Belarus, Lithuania, Poland) which is too far from Ukraine. During 1921-1939 western part of Belarus was part of Poland, so your ancestor traveled using Polish official documents and he was Polish citizen. Also, north-eastern Poland has Belarusian communities to this day. So , it’s likely your ancestor was a Belarusian.

    #388210

    Anonymous

    The village The village was in Sokolski uezd of Grodno governate. Demographics of Skolski uезd as per 1897 census.

    83.8% Belarusians
    12.2% Jews
    1.8% Russians
    1.2% Polеs

    Grodno state archive may have church records of your ancestors. 

    #388203

    Anonymous

    Sometimes, looking at other slavic cultures is like looking into those distorted image mirrors.
    “Boyko” as a surname? Blashpemy! So familiar and yet so hideously twisted. We need a Bulgarian empire to
    conquer and unite all Slavs and root out such foul corruption of the one true slavic culture.

    #390660

    Anonymous

    In family, the surname has been “translated” as Boico, Boiko and Boicko.

    #390661

    Anonymous

    Belarusian surname spelled as Бойко (on some occasions Бойка) in Cyrillic.

    #390650

    Anonymous

    aaaaa was referring to Boyko being a common personal name here in Bulgaria (our current prime minister being a Boyko himself). Boyko was a surname seems to us… somewhat strange indeed.

    #390645

    Anonymous

    @NikeBG

    There is a Bulgarian surname Boykov (Бойков) derived from given name. There is no given (first) name Boyko among eastern Slavs.

    #390646

    Anonymous

    Бойки (Boikos / Boykos) – Ukrainian highlanders of Halychyna in western Ukraine. Subgroup (one of the largest groups) of Ukrainian highlanders who inhabit the Carapathian mountains in south Lviv, and western Ivano-Frankivsk regions of Ukraine. Traditional Boiko music. 

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VVAVWDqo1R0

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