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  • #343714

    Anonymous

    does anyone know anything about the origin and history of these surnames? they are family surnames from my great grandmother whos family came from kresy/eastern poland

    Sobolewski

    Koziarski

    Pawlak

    regards

    #390676

    Anonymous

    They sound Polish to me and I am a native Polish speaker. Pawlak is quite common, the current Deputy Prime Minister who is also the Minister of Economy is named Waldemar Pawlak. The others I have never seen, but they look like straightforward Polish surnames.

    You view a long list of the most common Polish surnames here. The three names that you listed can all be found on it.

    #390677

    Anonymous

    thank you thats very helpful :)

    what polish tribe someone who bears the surname  "Maćkowiak" would most likely belong to?

    #390678

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    what polish tribe someone who bears the surname  "Maćkowiak" would most likely belong to?

    I am not sure, but that last name originates from the former peasant class. Tribe? I don't know, there haven't been tribes in ages and over the years language and orthography changes, thus tracing origins via name is hard. Try family records and genealogy.

    #390679

    Anonymous

    very interesting thanks :)
    how do you know it belongs to the former peasant class? curious to know

    do you know what region in Poland that surname originates from?

    regards

    #390680

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    does anyone know anything about the origin and history of these surnames? they are family surnames from my great grandmother whos family came from kresy/eastern poland

    Sobolewski

    Sobolewski is originally Russian (Соболевский), but it is present in Poland, Ukrainia and Belarus also. Name is derived from соболь (The sable (Martes zibellina) is a species of marten which inhabits forest environments, primarily in Russia from the Ural Mountains throughout Siberia, eastern Kazakstan, in northern Mongolia, China, North and South Korea and on Hokkaidō in Japan). In past centuries its fur was expensive and Russian rulers offten were giving it to Greek and Serbian bishops together with money. Russian merchants were getting lot money for sable furs.
    Well, to cut off topic, it is Polish surname, but if it is from Eastern Poland it could also be Belorussian/Ukrainian.

    #390681

    Anonymous

    thanks for the detailed information.

    i am a little confused now about the surname sobolewski .
    is it Polish ? or Russian/Belarusian/Ukrainian ? in origin

    many sites say Polish and many sites say Russian :p

    #390682

    Anonymous

    It depends how it is spelled. However, I think that West and East Slavic surnames which end in "ski" originate from the Polish language. By now they have found their way into all West and East Slavic languages, but they are most common in Polish.

    #390683

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    thanks for the detailed information.

    i am a little confused now about the surname sobolewski .
    is it Polish ? or Russian/Belarusian/Ukrainian ? in origin

    many sites say Polish and many sites say Russian :p

    It is Russian in origin because sables live in Russia, from Russia it spread in neigbourghing Slavic peoples (Belarussians, Ukrainianas and Poles). -ski is common Slavic suffix for building of adjectives, and such surnames could be find in all Slavic peoples.

    #390684

    Anonymous

    interesting. it sure does make sense. thanks again

    my great grandmother said her mothers famly were Polish nobles and their noble surnames were Sobolewski and Koziarski.

    #390685

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    my great grandmother said her mothers famly were Polish nobles and their noble surnames were Sobolewski and Koziarski.

    Is that z in Koziarski pronounced as "z" or "zh'?

    #390686

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Is that z in Koziarski pronounced as "z" or "zh'?

    It is pronounced as z.

    #390687

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    interesting. it sure does make sense. thanks again

    my great grandmother said her mothers famly were Polish nobles and their noble surnames were Sobolewski and Koziarski.

    Lot of Polish nobles were of Russian and Ruthenian origin, same as lot of Russian nobles were of Polish origin.

    #390688

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    It is pronounced as z.

    Ah, ok. Thank you :)

    #390689

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    It is pronounced as z.

    O_o

    Well, it is not. Letters "z" and "i" are pronounced as "ź". You not tell it is "kozjarski" but "koźarski" – in spelling.

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