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  • #347291

    Anonymous

    Academic Studies Press (ASP) invites manuscripts for its series in Slavic Studies – now including Ukrainian, Polish, and Lithuanian Studies! These new book series are edited by Vitaly Chernetsky, Halina Filipowicz, and Darius Staulinas respectively. ASP is an independent academic press, dedicated to promoting knowledge of Slavic, East European, and Central Asian studies, and is run by scholars for scholars.

    This Ukrainian ASP author just won an award. “From the Bible to Shakespeare” announced as Winner of the 2017 American Association for Ukrainian Studies Best Book in Language, Literature, and Culture

    Danylenko Author Photojpg

    The American Association for Ukrainian Studies has announced Andrii Danylenko (Pace University) as this year’s recipient of the AAUS Best Book in Language, Literature, and Culture for his volume From the Bible to Shakespeare: Pantelejmon Kuliš (1819–97) and the Formation of Literary Ukrainian (Academic Studies Press, 2016).


    POLISH STUDIES

    This series welcomes proposals in Polish studies, including literature, film, performance studies, gender and women’s
    studies, cultural and intellectual history, folklore, and critical theory. Open to different methodological approaches,
    interpretive perspectives, and historical frameworks, the series is designed to showcase the richness of Polish studies in
    the twenty-first century. It aims to offer new interpretations of familiar texts and practices; to take roads less traveled in
    Polish studies to look for fresh insights and extend available knowledge about a complex and controversial culture; to
    chart new directions in scholarship on Polish topics; and to open up cutting-edge interdisciplinary and comparative
    perspectives.
    Series Editor: Halina Filipowicz (University of Wisconsin, Madison) 

    UKRAINIAN STUDIES

    This series publishes scholarly monographs and edited multi-authored volumes in Ukrainian studies with a strong
    emphasis in the humanities, including literature, film and media studies, gender studies, history, intellectual history,
    cultural studies, art history, the performing arts, folklore, and musicology. It welcomes traditional approaches and
    methodologies as well as new and innovative frameworks that experiment with scholarly forms to meet the demands
    and richness of twenty-first century Ukrainian studies.

    This series also publishes translations of the best Ukrainian
    poetry and prose not previously available in English. Carving out new arenas in Ukrainian studies and developing and
    improving existing ones, this series publishes works that will be essential to scholars and students of Ukrainian studies
    for years to come.
    Series Editor: Vitaly Chernetsky (University of Kansas)

    To Submit a Proposal

    If you are interested in submitting a book proposal to ASP, please download and fill out our book proposal form as fully as possible, and email it to:

    Oleh Kotsyuba, PhD
    Slavic, East European, and Central Asian Studies
    [email protected]

    More information: http://www.academicstudiespress.com/for-authors/

    #438496

    Anonymous

    Very interesting academic journal article written in Ukrainian language, 1920: POLAND AND UKRAINE in the fight against the common enemy – SOVIET RUSSIA.” https://www.academia.edu/30653328/1920_%D0%A0%D0%86%D0%9A_%D0%9F%D0%9E%D0%9B%D0%AC%D0%A9%D0%90_%D0%86_%D0%A3%D0%9A%D0%A0%D0%90%D0%87%D0%9D%D0%90_%D0%A3_%D0%91%D0%9E%D0%A0%D0%9E%D0%A2%D0%AC%D0%91%D0%86_%D0%9F%D0%A0%D0%9E%D0%A2%D0%98_%D0%A1%D0%9F%D0%86%D0%9B%D0%AC%D0%9D%D0%9E%D0%93%D0%9E_%D0%92%D0%9E%D0%A0%D0%9E%D0%93%D0%90_%D0%A0%D0%90%D0%94%D0%AF%D0%9D%D0%A1%D0%AC%D0%9A%D0%9E%D0%87_%D0%A0%D0%9E%D0%A1%D0%86%D0%87

    Abstract:

    Having been defeated in the struggle against «red» and «white» Russia, in late 1919 the Ukrainian 
    People’s Republic for some time had to step off the political arena. Its armed forces were partially 
    interned by Poles, partially were in guerilla raid in deep enemy’s rear. The resumption of the struggle 
    for the independence of Ukraine was related with the presence of foreign allies. Such ally became 
    only Poland. In April 1920 Ukraine had to sign with it difficult and unfair Warsaw treaties. The article 
    is devoted to the common struggle of the Polish Army and the Army of Ukrainian People’s Republic 
    against Soviet Russia. However, it did not bring the independence, having ended with signing of the 
    Peace of Riga, which divided Ukrainian lands between Warsaw and Moscow. 

    #438499

    Anonymous

    Unfortunately, I can’t view this PDF
    with my slow Internet, but I will check when it will temporarily
    speed up. I just want to add something to this abstract.

    It says about “difficult and
    unfair Warsaw treaties”. I know about one treaty, but it’s a
    detail – what is more important, is that treaties are not meant to be
    comfy for any side, while this sentence suggests that Poland gained
    everything, and Ukraine lost a lot. In reality, it was mainly solving
    an issue of territorial dispute, and both sides had to find a
    compromise – they did, Poland resigned from various lands (Poland
    wanted to regain full control over territories annexed by the Russian
    Empire in 1772) and Ukraine resigned from various lands. But most
    importantly, it not only ended the war between Poland and Ukraine –
    it also made an alliance between both countries. Also, Poland
    officially recognised People’s Ukrainian Republic as an independent
    country.

    The Treaty of Riga, however, is morally
    not the best treaty that Poland could have ever signed. According to
    me at least. It was a violation of the Treaty of Warsaw, the
    representatives from People’s Ukrainian Republic were not invited and
    Poland acknowledged the Ukrainian Soviet Republic as “Ukrainian
    delegature”, which meant cancelling the recognition of People’s
    Ukrainian Republic. There are few reasons why it happened. First is
    who was a member of Polish delegature: it were mainly the members of
    Endecja, which is National Democracy (Narodowa Demokracja) – created
    by Roman Dmowski, main political and ideological opponent of Józef
    Piłsudski. Dmowski believed in creating a national state, he cheered
    for polonization of Belarusians and Ukrainians. Also, during World
    War I, he was preaching for allying with Russia and fighting against
    the Central Powers – Piłsudski did the opposite. Endecja during
    these peace talks did not wanted to help in creating independent
    Ukraine, as they wanted to incorporate more lands to Poland, and they
    believed that independent Ukraine will sooner or later ally with the
    Germans and be against Poland again. Well, this part they predicted
    correctly, in a way. However, they also believed that communist
    government – bolsheviks – are a temporary issue and soon “the
    whites” will regain control over Russia. And then Poland and
    Russian Empire could ally against the Germans. This didn’t happened.

    As a result Ukraine didn’t regained
    official independence and was divided between Poland and the Soviet
    Union. However, the Treaty of Riga was not something that Piłsudski
    was happy about, since it put an end on his concept of federation.
    Even some members of National Democracy were unhappy, some supporters
    of Trotsky in the Soviet Union, obviously the Ukrainians, and the
    only who was rather happy were common people, who noted mainly one
    thing: the war is over.

    The Treaty of Warsaw itself, which was
    mentioned as some devastating necessity for Ukrainians could have
    been an actual symbol of Polish-Ukrainian friendship, which nowadays
    doesn’t exist. Unfortunately, the Peace of Riga sort of destroyed
    that concept.

    #438501

    Anonymous

    Why are you promoting a bunch of traitors trying to subvert and re-write Slavic history, folklore, culture by inserting Cultural Marxist distortions to poison the minds of our people? You should all be disgusted with yourselves.

    #438505

    Anonymous

    @gaiuscoriolanus Thank you for the detailed commentary! I am very interested in this period of history because some of my ancestors went back to visit and were detained because of the Civil War. You explained this very well. If you wrote a book, I would buy it! 

    @mavka 

    Why are you promoting a bunch of traitors trying to subvert and re-write Slavic history, folklore, culture by inserting Cultural Marxist distortions to poison the minds of our people? You should all be disgusted with yourselves.

    Okay, then you write a book with the correct and accurate information. 

    #438506

    Anonymous

    @Karpivna

     I am very interested in this period of history because some of my ancestors went back to visit and were detained because of the Civil War.

    In which years? :) There was no civil war per se, I guess one of the other conflicts? 

    #438509

    Anonymous

    @GaiusCoriolanus 1916-1923 I call this period of Civil Unrest in Eastern Poland/Western Ukraine a “Civil War.” What is the accurate term?

    #438513

    Anonymous

    We only have a term for years 1918-1939 and call it Interwar period. If your ancestors came in 1916, then it was during World War I – so depending on the region the country [officially] which they entered may vary. But after the ending of that war, other conflicts took place in this region. And these conflicts were not helpful for newly-born Second Republic of Poland in creating whole law and administration that could work properly from the very beginning :D So I guess the wars and general problems with administration have prolonged the visit of your ancestors ;)

    What kind of mess was here right after regaining independence is the fact, that we had 4 different currencies until 1920 and four years later another reform took place. Ah, and we had two different railroad systems. :)

    #438518

    Anonymous

    >The resumption of the struggle for the independence of Ukraine was related with the presence of foreign allies. Such ally became only Poland.

    Poland became an ally of Ukraine in 1919? Half of Ukraine lost its independence to Poland. The other half lost its independence to Bolshevik Russia. If Bolshevik Russia gave republic to Ukraine, then Poland built a unitarian state closing Ukrainian universities, schools, Orthodox churches. The press was banned in Ukrainian language. There were ethnic tensions between Poles and Ukrainians as a result between 1921-1939. It eventuated to Volyn messacre during the war in 1940s. On the hand Kremlin authorities were responsible for Holodomor in other hal of Ukraine in 1932-1933. Ukraine didn’t have allies during interwar period.

    #438520

    Anonymous

    Poland became an ally of Ukraine in 1919?

    Yes.

    #438521

    Anonymous

    If there was an ally to Ukraine, then it would be Germany who helped Ukraine to gain  independence from Russia in 1918 after Brest-Litovsk treaty.

    In the treaty, Bolshevik Russia ceded the Baltic States to Germany; they were meant to become German vassal states under German princelings.[2] Russia also ceded its province of Kars Oblast in the South Caucasus to the Ottoman Empire and recognized the independence of Ukraine.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Brest-Litovsk

    #438522

    Anonymous

    @Sviatogor, it’s about another war.

    #438523

    Anonymous

    @GaiusCoriolanus

    Poland was not an ally of Ukraine. Poland had its own political interests. Such articles claiming Poland was an ally appeared recently due conflict between Russia and Ukraine. Germany was not an ally either. Germans, Austrians wanted to split the Russian empire after WWI helping Ukraine and Belarus to establish  their independent states.

    #438524

    Anonymous

    Poland was not an ally of Ukraine.


    Poland was an ally of Ukraine.

    Poland had its own political interests.


    Of course. Why shouldn’t Poland have own interests? O_o

    Such articles claiming Poland was an ally appeared recently due conflict between Russia and Ukraine.


    Such articles exist since the Interwar period. It appeared recently to you personally, because you weren’t informed before.

    #438529

    Anonymous

    How can Poland be an ally of Ukraine while being responsible for the disolution of independent Ukrainian republic closing Ukrainian schools, Universities, churches, cultural centres, banning press in Ukrainian language? Poland pursued its own political goals.

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