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  • #343887

    Anonymous

    There is a distinct Belarusian accent I have noticed. When I spoke to Belarusians it was hard to keep up because they would speak very quickly. What are the characteristics of the Belarusian accent?

    #393237

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    There is a distinct Belarusian accent I have noticed. When I spoke to Belarusians it was hard to keep up because they would speak very quickly. What are the characteristics of the Belarusian accent?

    Do you talk about Belarusian accent of Russian (way they pronounce Russian), or their accent as whole (Belarusian, Russian English)?

    #393238

    Anonymous

    When they speak Russian mostly but also in English. A Russian guy told me they speak like they are making an interrogation.

    #393239

    Anonymous

    I could only write what I noticed about them speaking Russian, since I never had chance to hear them in  English.
    They use hard "р" n place where Russians pronounce soft one, their pronouciation of Russia "ч" is hard like in Serbian, "г" on end of the word is like "х", unstressed "я" is pronounced as yа, not as yi. They are also sometimes mixing grammatical and natural genders (eg  белый собака, insted of белая  собака).

    Concerning how fast they speak, I don't know. For us Serbs even Russians speak to fast, Southern Slavs (except Bulgarians, speak rather slow, compared to Eastern).

    #393240

    Anonymous

    Thank you for the information.

    #393241

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    They are also sometimes mixing grammatical and natural genders (eg  белый собака, insted of белая  собака).

    Pure nonsense.
    One of notable part of Belarus accent is very soft "t" and "d", it sounds like Russian ць, дзь. It happens when Polish has ć, dź.

    Ukrainians speak faster, it seems.

    #393242

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Pure nonsense.
    One of notable part of Belarus accent is very soft "t" and "d", it sounds like Russian ць, дзь. It happens when Polish has ć, dź.
    Ukrainians speak faster, it seems.

    I just stated my impression. I heard video with guy who was making such mistake. Maybe I generalized a bit, but he was speaking like that.
    Also, it is still my impression that Ukrainians speak slower (in Russian).

    Here is Yanukovich junior (Really, no political conotations, he and other people arround speak rather slow)

    Виктор Янукович-младший: "Все хорошо!"

    here Lukashenko really speak slow, but that speaker is fast.
    Again it is just my impression.

    совещание у Лукашенко 05.04.2012 по внешней политике

    #393243

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I heard video with guy who was making such mistake.

    This is impossible. He was sure not from Belarus or you misheard something. If a Belarus native makes such mistake everybody will laugh.
    People from Karelian villages sometimes mix genders, because Karelian language dousn't have gender.

    #393244

    Anonymous

    Lenka, do you speak Belorussian?

    #393245

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    One of notable part of Belarus accent is very soft "t" and "d", it sounds like Russian ць, дзь. It happens when Polish has ć, dź.

    As well as the letter 'Ў' in place of  'v'. "Цеканье" as you mentioned, letter 'ya' in place of 'e' and notorious use of letter 'a'. маразы (frosts)… :)

    #393246

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Lenka, do you speak Belorussian?

    She is half Belarusian afaik. She may know it.  :)

    #393247

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Lenka, do you speak Belorussian?

    No, I wasn't even born there.

    #393248

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    No, I wasn't even born there.

    Oh, ok.

    #393249

    Anonymous

    There was a Belarusian folk ensemble in Slovakia this year who sang the songs in Belarusian language. Actually, if I can judge it from what I heard, it sounded like something in between Russian and Polish, closer to Russian though, but not the same, of course. Then I talked to two of them, but they spoke to me in Russian, unfortunately, so I can't tell more.

    Of course, Belarusian language itself is unique, but after all Belarus is located between Russia and Poland, therefore it's natural I heard chut'-chut' from both languages.  :)

    #393250

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    This is impossible. He was sure not from Belarus or you misheard something. If a Belarus native makes such mistake everybody will laugh.

    On the contrary, it is quite possible. In Belarusian "sabaka" is he: чорны злы сабака, in Russian "sobaka" is she: чёрная злая собака.

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