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  • #344086

    Anonymous
    [size=12pt]Bosniak culture in Anatolia[/size]

    The population in a Central Anatolian village is totally made up of Bosniaks, who immigrated to the region many years ago. The people of the village keep their culture alive with their language, traditional foods and more. Bosnians who moved to the Kayadibi village in the Central Anatolian province of Sivas’ Zara district many years ago are maintaining their Bosnian culture in Anatolia. The village is 105 kilometers away from Sivas and 35 kilometers away from Zara. There are 28 houses in the village and everyone from 7 to 70 can speak the Bosniak language. They also serve their guests traditional Bosnian foods like Bosnian pastry and Bosnian bread.

    Traditional dresses are worn by the villagers during the festivities that are organized in the city from time to time. The villagers expressed great pleasure that the Anatolia news agency has started broadcasting in Bosniak language. The head of the village, Vedat Çelebi, said the people of Kayadibi were immigrants from Yugoslavia and that their ancestors migrated to the village in 1924. “Since then, we have maintained our own traditions in this village, kept our culture alive with our traditional foods, dresses and language. One of the residents in the village, Fatih Demir, 24, said that since their origins were from Bosnia and Herzegovina, they were doing their best to keep their own culture alive. “I hope that this will continue. We will do what our adults have done so far to keep our culture alive.”

    Hİlmi Çelebi, 60, said that as Bosnians, they were respected people in the region. “We love and respect everyone, too. We are proud of being Bosnians.” The founder of Turkish Republic, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, settled Bosniaks in the Kayadibi village shortly after the foundation of the Turkish Republic. There are currently 100 Bosniaks living in the village, but the registered population is 1,000. A large proportion of Kayadibi’s population has moved to Istanbul. One of the events organized in the village is Pita Day. During the event, Kayadibi’s women prepare Bosnia’s pita pastry and serve it to visitors of the village.

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    #396710

    Anonymous

    once the article  mentioned Ataturk settling them here, I guess they're just result of greek-bulgarian-turkish forced ressetlements

    #396711

    Anonymous

    There was no forced repopulation in Kingdom of SHS (Yugoslavia), also there was no Bosniaks in Bulgaria or Greece :D

    #396712

    Anonymous

    I wouldnt make such a claims, udner ottomans, bosniaks settled as far as levantine coast or egypt

    #396713

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I wouldnt make such a claims, udner ottomans, bosniaks settled as far as levantine coast or egypt

    And got assymilated. You have native Slavic ******s in Bulgaria and Macedonia, Pomaci and Torbeši. Anyway, that people came from Yugoslavia, you could read it in first post.
    Bosniak is allways štokavian speaking ******

    #396714

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I wouldnt make such a claims, udner ottomans, bosniaks settled as far as levantine coast or egypt

    It says in the article that they migrated from Yugoslavia to Turkey in 1924.

    #396715

    Anonymous

    Once ottomans left Balkans,many bosniaks migrated to Turkey,,and you have them even in Egypt,Palestine,Syria,Saudi arabia

    one of the most rich families in Saudi Arabia al Bushnaki,are bosniaks

    #396716

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    one of the most rich families in Saudi Arabia al Bushnaki,are bosniaks

    Are they still Bosniaks? Or are they now Arabs?

    #396717

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Are they still Bosniaks? Or are they now Arabs?

    Well i have no idea,i know they invest in Bosnia and I read an interview with one of them in a bosnian paper,but i dont know if they speak bosnian

    #396718

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Are they still Bosniaks? Or are they now Arabs?

    I've read that they mainly took Bosniak and Euro convert women as wives. So I guess they biologically are Bosniaks, but I doubt that anyone besides the oldest patriarchs can utter a word in Bosnian.

    #396719

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Well i have no idea,i know they invest in Bosnia and I read an interview with one of them in a bosnian paper,but i dont know if they speak bosnian

    I'd assume they would be assimilated. Saudis are ridiculously religious, so it was probably easy to assimilate them. Btw, how long ago did they move to Saudi Arabia?

    #396720

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I've read that they mainly took Bosniak and Euro convert women as wives. So I guess they biologically are Bosniaks, but I doubt that anyone besides the oldest patriarchs can utter a word in Bosnian.

    That's a shame. Serbs and Croats seem to keep their culture and customs well alive in the diaspora, why can't Bosniaks?

    #396721

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I'd assume they would be assimilated. Saudis are ridiculously religious, so it was probably easy to assimilate them. Btw, how long ago did they move to Saudi Arabia?

    Pretty much.

    They moved during the Omerpaša Latas purges of the Houses in Bosnia, they lost everything then, picked up everything they had left and moved to KSA.

    #396722

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    That's a shame. Serbs and Croats seem to keep their culture and customs well alive in the diaspora, why can't Bosniaks?

    Most of their "alive" unassimilated diaspora which clings to Serb and Croat traditions are those which came after the WW2 :P

    #396723

    Anonymous

    Even though they are assimilated they are very much aware of their bosnian roots it seems

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