• This topic has 30 voices and 109 replies.
Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 110 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #412324

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    We say the same about western food :D

    You as inhabitants of Sweden?

    #412325

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    You as inhabitants of Sweden?

    No me as a Bosniak,the fact i live in Sweden can give me only more rights to say which food tastes better

    #412326

    Anonymous

    but Scandinavian food is anything more closer to Slavic cuisine, than it is to American new world cuisine.  Unless you meant western food in Sweden, then yes.

    There's nothing really comparable between American and Bosniak cuisine, except for Pita Beard but AFAIK Bosniaks don't put Tomato / Lettuce in their bread and AFAIK I've only ever had sliced ham in my pita bread not beef.

    #412327

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I wont give up cevapcici,burek,baklava or turkish coffee ;D

    Hm, our (Yugoslav) Turkish coffe is acctually European one, despite name. I was in Istanbul, they drinkg dolivuša. :P

    Quote:
    No me as a Bosniak,the fact i live in Sweden can give me only more rights to say which food tastes better

    Мало сам се шалио. :)

    #412328

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Hm, our (Yugoslav) Turkish coffe is acctually European one, despite name. I was in Istanbul, they drinkg dolivuša. :P

    My friends drank Turkish coffee in the centre of Carihrad (Istanbul) and said that it tasted like a plastic.  Just saying.  :D

    #412329

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    My friends drank Turkish coffee in the centre of Carihrad (Istanbul) and said that it tasted like a plastic.  Just saying.  :D

    Yes, that was what I refering to her. What is known as "Turkish coffe" in Europe is rather strong boiled coffe. That is popular in Central, Eastern and SouthEastern Europe. Real Turkish coffe is verry light, something like tea. :) I was verry disapointed, when tried it. :)

    #412330

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    My friends drank Turkish coffee in the centre of Carihrad (Istanbul) and said that it tasted like a plastic.  Just saying.  :D

    I guess our bosnian version of the coffee is better ;D

    #412331

    Anonymous

    but Scandinavian food is anything more closer to Slavic cuisine, than it is to American new world cuisine.  Unless you meant western food in Sweden, then yes.

    I dont know anything about slavic food,,swedes have i am sure influence from all parts of world,,they even have 2 dishes from Turkey that according to the story their king brought when visiting the ottoman empire(kåldome and köttbullar or köfte)

    My favorite is italian,but i like everything that tastes good :)

    #412332

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I guess our bosnian version of the coffee is better ;D

    Words of my english teacher in high school, about our coffee : could awake a deadman  ;D

    About food, maslenitsa is for sure Slavic.

    #412333

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Words of my english teacher in high school, about our coffee : could awake a deadman  ;D

    About food, maslenitsa is for sure Slavic.

    I think ustipici are slavic too :D

    #412334

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I think ustipici are slavic too :D

    and now Bosanski lonac  8)

    #412335

    Anonymous

    Certainly Slavic as any other Slavic people, but their religion is indeed foreign to other Slavs and I am not pro-muslim at all.

    Still, I obviously voted "yes". And some of their women are incredibly beautiful.

    #412336

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    And some of their women are incredibly beautiful.

    The chance of me getting a Bosnian roomie is 50% so it is weather she is or is not.
    But annyway, a thing I realised after her and many many other bosnian girls/females is that quite a nice amount of them have this big oval shaped face with small eyes, nose and lips that are semi-plump and mediumly puffy cheeks. Tbh this look makes them look a bit younger and very cute  :D

    #412337

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    The chance of me getting a Bosnian roomie is 50% so it is weather she is or is not.
    But annyway, a thing I realised after her and many many other bosnian girls/females is that quite a nice amount of them have this big oval shaped face with small eyes, nose and lips that are semi-plump and mediumly puffy cheeks. Tbh this look makes them look a bit younger and very cute  :D

    Yeah, I've noticed that too, however from my experience their noses were quite straight and bony. They kinda looked goofy, but in a positive/cute way.

    As for the plump nose and full cheeks, yeah, I know what you mean, I have them both :D + quite big child-like eyes, sometimes I think even 20 years from now I'll still look like a teenager… it's so frustrating.

    Hm maybe my neoteny is due to some distant and unkwnown Bosniak ancestor of mine…

    #412338

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Yes, that was what I refering to her. What is known as "Turkish coffe" in Europe is rather strong boiled coffe. That is popular in Central, Eastern and SouthEastern Europe. Real Turkish coffe is verry light, something like tea. :) I was verry disapointed, when tried it. :)

    It's only even known as Turkish coffee because of the fact the Ottomans made possible the transfer of coffee to Europe. Also because we didn't have much of a culture during Ottoman years so a lot of everything was just called Turkish since they were the founders of the empire. It would be more accurate if it was described as Ottoman coffee since without the Ottoman empire then coffee would probably have come to Europe a quite bit later. However if 100% accuracy is that important then it should be called Bedouin/Yemeni/Arabian coffee because it originated from there.

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 110 total)

The topic ‘Bosniaks’ is closed to new replies.

Slavorum

9 User(s) Online Join Server
  • Drizzt
  • 'las
  • kony97
  • Lyutenitsa
  • Piachu
  • Yung Slav