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  • #354700

    Anonymous

    Would be great to see some RAC and NSBM coming from there too. Nationalism needs to grow in Europe.

    #354701

    Anonymous

    BTW Can anyone please tell if there is difference between Montenegrin and Serbian?

    #354702

    Anonymous

    There's no difference.

    #354703

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    BTW Can anyone please tell if there is difference between Montenegrin and Serbian?

    Montenegrin language doesn't exist, Serbian exist. Huge difference ;)

    #354704

    Anonymous

    He didn't mention the word language. Serbian and Montenegrin could be dialects.

    #354705

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    He didn't mention the word language. Serbian and Montenegrin could be dialects.

    But they are not dialects. On terirtory of Montenegro exist two dilaects of Serbian language-istocnohercegovacki (official), and zetsko-juznosandzacki (not official).

    http://sr.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%A1%D0%BB%D0%B8%D0%BA%D0%B0:Dijalekti-%C5%A0tokavskog-nare%C4%8Dja.svg

    #354706

    Anonymous

    Of course I know that, but why do you think Wilkolak should know that? As far as he knows, they are two territories, they might as well be two dialects.

    BTW, I know it's from all-knowing Wikipedia, but I doubt that map is correct. From what's shown there, one would come to a conclusion that in Subotica and the surounding people speak mostly ikavski, which is very far from the truth. A handful of Bunjevci can't be enough to colour the whole area in brown. Alike, I don't think ikavci compose a majority anywhere outside Dalmatia. Also, Šumadijsko-Vojvođanski is definitely more widespread than shown on the map. Unchanged yat? Hard to believe there's much left of it. Besides, the thing that we call "nezamenjeno jat" isn't really unchanged. In proto-slavic yat was pronounced as open e, and the so-called unchanged yat is a close e. Also, it's hard to trust a map that has no shaded half this – half that area.

    #354707

    Anonymous

    Wilkolak, let's forget for a moment that the map isn't precise, but it isn't a complete fail either, so take a look at it. See the yellow area? That's East Herzegovinian dialect, and it's the one used in Croatian and Bosnian standards exclusively, in Serbian together with the blue Šumadijsko-Vojvođanski, and in the wannabe Montenegrin standard some of their linguists want to use it together with the red Zeta-South Sandžak dialect as official.

    #354708

    Anonymous

    It really is quite complex for people outside of region to grasp exactly what differences are. ;)

    Therefore Dervan andf Obrens, in your opinions, what are only existing Southern Slavic languages (excluding dialects)?

    #354709

    Anonymous

    but I doubt that map is correct

    That map is work of famous philologist Pavle Ivic, and doesn't represent current situation.

    Therefore Dervan andf Obrens, in your opinions, what are only existing Southern Slavic languages (excluding dialects)?

    Serbian/Croatian, Slovenian, Macedonian and Bulgarian.
    Same as Serbian/Croatian but official: Bosniak, Montenegrin and Bunjevac language.

    #354710

    Anonymous

    Like already mentioned. The Eastern-Herzegovinian dialect (map yellow) of the Serbian language was used as the standard Yugoslavian language, or Serbo-Croatian. It is still in use in the "new" languages: Croatian, Bosnian, Montenegrin as the prime standard, with some slight regional differences concerning vocabulary and accent. That is the reason why we all understand each other, but have different names for the same language.


      [li]

    What makes Eastern-Herzegovinian so "special"?[/li]

    [table][tr]
    [td]Eastern-Herzegovinian or the ijekavian reflex of the Serbian language has the longest tradition in the Serbian language, it is the form in which the greatest part of the Serbian national literature was written.

    In the course of the great Serb migrations, this dialect spread throughout the area, which is clearly visible in the map (the yellow partitions are Serb inhabited areas of Bosnia and Croatia) and influenced the surrounding languages to a great extent, even suppressing and replacing native Croat dialects like Chakavian and Kajkavian in some regions.

    The Croatians agreed to use the same dialect as the Serbs for their standard, because of the already great influence of the Serbian dialect upon their language, making it virtually the same. Another important reason was that the great part of renaissance literature of Dubrovnik was also written in that dialect.

    The Croatian language today has an extremly puristic note, not allowing any or very few loan words. This is a very noble aspect, for which I personally have only words of respect, even though sometimes this can go slightly over the edge, especially in the area of neologism.[/td]

    [td][img height=300]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c3/Shtokavian_subdialects1988_incl_Slovenia.png/743px-Shtokavian_subdialects1988_incl_Slovenia.png”/>[/td][/tr][/table]

    #354711

    Anonymous

    As well as Croats have Slovenian dialects as well incorporated into Croatian language, probably leftovers of Great Moravia.

    Pentaz i dont understand what do you mean by this?

    #354712

    Anonymous

    To add to this discussion, how similar are Macedonian and Bulgarian? As similar as Serbo-Croatian languages?
    Can they really be called separate languages or dialects of common East South Slavic language?

    #354713

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    To add to this discussion, how similar are Macedonian and Bulgarian? As similar as Serbo-Croatian languages?
    Can they really be called separate languages or dialects of common East South Slavic language?

    My friend had an experience when he was on vacation in Bulgaria, after a lengthy conversation with the hotel manager, he asked him whether he is from Serbia or Macedonia?
    As some Serb can sound very similar Macedonian with Bulgarian, the same is with the Bulgarians, though Bulgarian scientists don't recognize Macedonian nation and language.
    From my experience, we can more easly comunicate with Macedonians then Bulgarians.

    Comparison with other Slavic languages:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulgarian_language

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macedonian_language

    #354714

    Anonymous

    "From my experience, we can more easly comunicate with Macedonians then Bulgarians."

    When I work with Macedonian and Bulgarian people I use a dialect spoken in Janjevo (Croatian enclave in Kosova) and both Macedonian and Bulgarian people say it is easier for them to comunicate that way than me using straight Croatian.  I think a dialect used in Niš area is similar to janjevački.(see the movie "Zona Zamfirova")

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