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  • #354715

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    "From my experience, we can more easly comunicate with Macedonians then Bulgarians."

    When I work with Macedonian and Bulgarian people I use a dialect spoken in Janjevo (Croatian enclave in Kosova) and both Macedonian and Bulgarian people say it is easier for them to comunicate that way than me using straight Croatian.  I think a dialect used in Niš area is similar to janjevački.(see the movie "Zona Zamfirova")

    You are probably referring to the Torlakian dialect, also called old-shtokavian. It is a transitional dialect between the Serbian the Macedonian and the Bulgarian language, similar to the Kajkavian, being a transitional dialect between the Croatian and the Slovene language.

    #354716

    Anonymous

    Could be that,didn`t look in to it.  I learned it as a kid with my friends because I could not make them all learn kajkavian ;D
    First things I learned was "N`mo se zadevaš mnogo,tepanje ima da izeš" (I answer with "Kaj?") "Ako,ako,vragovi `ma te izeju,kat će te ufatim" ;D ;D

    #354717

    Anonymous
    Quote:

    That picture representing our dialect is slightly "skewed" :D

    No nothing is skewed. I told you that majority of Bosniaks speak Jekavian-Šćakavian, not all of them. Some speak Newer Ikavian some Easter-Herzegovinian, but vast majority speak Jekavian-Šćakavian. Also some Croats speak East-Herzegovinian, some Serbs speak Croat and Bosniak sub-dialects, but pint is that East-Herzeggovinian, (basis of modern Serbian) was Serbian, and that majority of Bosniaks speak slightly different subdialect.
    You know verry well, that majority of Bosniaks do not differentiate č and ć in their speach, pronunciation is basically jekavian (not ijekavian-jekavian).

    #354718

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Some speak Newer Ikavian some Easter-Herzegovinian, but vast majority speak Jekavian-Šćakavian.

    Some people in my hometown (Velika Kladusa) speak Ikavian. I picked up some Ikavian words as well from them. Btw, what is Newer Ikavian?

    #354719

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Some people in my hometown (Velika Kladusa) speak Ikavian. I picked up some Ikavian words as well from them. Btw, what is Newer Ikavian?

    Bosnian–Dalmatian, Newer Ikavian, Younger Ikavian:


    Also called Western Ikavian or Younger Ikavian. The majority of its speakers are Croats who live in Lika, Kvarner, Dalmatia, Herzegovina and Bunjevci and Croats of north Bačka around Subotica. The minority speakers of it include Bosniaks in western Bosnia, mostly around the city of Bihać, and also in central Bosnia where Croats and Bosniaks (Travnik, Jajce, Bugojno, Vitez, ..) used to speak this dialect. Exclusively ikavian accent, Bosnian and Herzegovinian forms use o in verb participle, while those in Dalmatia and Lika use -ija or ia like in vidija/vidia. Local form of Bačka was proposed as the base for the Bunjevac dialect of Bunjevci in Vojvodina.

    Velika Kladuša is in Bihać region.

    #354720

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Bosnian–Dalmatian, Newer Ikavian, Younger Ikavian:

    Interesting. Even the first Bosnian dictionary was written in Ikavian dialect.

    [img height=200]http://www.depo.ba/media/pictures/2012/03/14/f23afe8e6712d22f45eb795d9629668b.jpg” />

    #354721

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    You know verry well, that majority of Bosniaks do not differentiate č and ć in their speach, pronunciation is basically jekavian (not ijekavian-jekavian).

    I know that very well, my problem with the map is that it didn't show that people in central Bosnia and Podrinje have difficulties as well making the difference between č and ć :)

    While Krajina is pretty much "kruh" all the way :P

    #354722

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    While Krajina is pretty much "kruh" all the way :P

    You Sarajevans don't say Kruh?

    Quote:
    For the same very reason the Croats of today have Bosniak as last name :P

    You know, there are also Hungarians with the surname Bosnyák, and Russians with Бошняк (Boshnyak) ;D

    #354723

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I know that very well, my problem with the map is that it didn't show that people in central Bosnia and Podrinje have difficulties as well making the difference between č and ć :)

    While Krajina is pretty much "kruh" all the way :P

    Just for you again main difference is reflex of jat:
    Ijekavian (East Herzegovinian) d[size=14pt]ije[/size]te, Šćakavian-Ijekavian d[size=14pt]je[/size]te, Younger Ikavian: d[size=14pt]i[/size]te.

    You are constantly mixing ethnic and dialect maps. There are Serbs who speak Jekavian-Šćakavian (Serbs from Tuzla for example). And funny enough they differ č and ć verry well but still they show all ather characteristics of Jekavian-Šćakavian, so they are considered as Jekavian-Šćakavian speakers.

    In Kraijana (Krajina as whole western Bosna) it is kru complete lack of h. Same with ljeb instead hljeb.

    And please, if we could contnue with national heroes. Linguistics are completly off topic.

    #354724

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    In Kraijana (Krajina as whole western Bosna) it is kru complete lack of h. Same with ljeb instead hljeb.

    We say Kruh in the Bosniak parts.

    Quote:
    And please, if we could contnue with national heroes. Linguistics are completly off topic.

    Why don't we make a topic on Serbo-Croatian dialects?

    #354725

    Anonymous

    Kruh (Kruv) and Hljeb were two different things. Kruh was made of corn (krupica), Hljeb of wheat. Croats still say for loaf of bread, hljeb, but for bread alone they use kruh, same as some Serbs like in Krajina or Montenegro.

    #354726

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Kruh (Kruv) and Hljeb were two different things. Kruh was made of corn (krupica), Hljeb of wheat. Croats still say for loaf of bread, hljeb, but for bread alone they use kruh, same as some Serbs like in Krajina or Montenegro.

    I find it odd though that Bosniaks in Sandzak say Hljeb for bread; they don't use the word Kruh. I figured Montenegrins and Bosniaks in Montenegro would use the same words. But this is just my personal experience.

    #354727

    Anonymous

    Muslim in Montenegro speak just like the rest of us. tho only difference is that they use more turkish words.

    #354728

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Muslim in Montenegro speak just like the rest of us. tho only difference is that they use more turkish words.

    Do you guys say Kruh?

    #354729

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Do you guys say Kruh?

    no, at least not we tho speak zeta dialect. and I am sure that the rest of Montenegrins don't use it too.
    maybe catholics in coastal area.

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