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  • #343230

    Anonymous

    I'm not sure if I got this one in the right sub, so if you guys think it would be better suited somewhere else you are welcome to move it :)

    I recently came upon this Czech composer, Zelenka, and really like his works
    Jan Dismas Zelenka (1679-1745): Missa Dei Patris

    #382023

    Anonymous

    Contemporary classical music

    Winter Road by Georgy Sviridov

    Sviridov – The Snowstorm – Winter Road – PART 9 of 9

    #382024

    Anonymous

    I suspect not everyone will like this music but it a famous and influential piece composed by Russian composer Igor Starvinsky and choreographed by Polish choreographer Vaslav Nijinsky in 1913.

    The Rite of Spring (Original Russian title: Весна священная ) is often held up as a masterwork that changed modern music forever. Music commentator Miles Hoffman takes the distinction one step further. "The Rite of Spring," Hoffman says, "represents one of the greatest creative leaps in not only the history of music, but in the history of the arts."Stravinsky's music is famous for causing a riot at its premiere.

    "The ballet was choreographed by the great Nijinsky," Hoffman says, "and the noise, fighting, and shouting in the audience got so loud, he had to shout out the numbers to the dancers so that they knew what they were supposed to do." One shrewd musicologist wrote that "the pagans on stage made pagans of the audience."

    Hoffman says that the idea of pagans is right on the mark."The subtitle of The Rite of Spring," Hoffman says, "is 'Pictures of Pagan Russia,' a celebration of pagan rituals that eventually leads to a sacrifice of a chosen young woman to propitiate the gods of spring. It's not what you call a happy tale."

    "It's a shocking piece," Hoffman says. "It's still startling to us today when we hear it, but it is not a confusing piece. It's compelling. We're hearing irregular rhythms, we're hearing instruments asked to go to the extremes of their capability, but we're also hearing patterns that we recognize, with pacing, contrast, fascinating harmonies, continuity — all the basic principles of what makes a piece of music work are all there. And that shows us the secret of Stravinsky's genius."

    The Rite of Spring also opened doors to countless possibilities for future composers."It liberated many composers," Hoffman says, "and there were many imitators. I don't think you can listen to modern movie music without sooner or later hearing the influence of Stravinsky and the Rite.

    Stravinsky's own description of his inspiration: “I had a fleeting vision that came to me as a complete surprise … I saw in imagination a solemn pagan rite: sage elders, seated in a circle, watching a young girl dance herself to death. They were sacrificing her to propitate the god of spring”.

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=88490677

    The Rite of Spring is divided into two parts : Adoration of the Earth and The Exalted Sacrifice

    Stravinsky- Rite of Spring "Opening"

    Stravinsky- Rite of Spring "Sacrificial Dance"

    #382025

    Anonymous

    Great thread Cotys and great posts Kudesnik. ;) :D

    #382026

    Anonymous
    #382027

    Anonymous
    #382028

    Anonymous
    #382029

    Anonymous

    "Waves of the Danube" by I. Ivanovichi

    Ion Ivanovici (alternatively, Iosif Ivanovici, Josef Ivanovici, baptised as Jovan Ivanović) (1845 — September 28, 1902) was a Romanian military band leader and composer, best remembered today for his waltz Waves of the Danube. (baptised as Jovan Ivanović, a Romanian of Serb ancestry, thus also a Slavic composer)

    #382030

    Anonymous

    Franz Liszt – Slovak father, German mother

    Here is his less well-known piece Slavimo Slavno Slaveni (Let's Celebrate Famous Slavs!) composed for the Millennium celebration of the arrival of Slavic apostles Saint Cyril and Saint Methodius to the area of present-day Slovakia. The celebrations took place in Rome in July 1863, organized by Pope Pius IX; Liszt was personally present.

    F.Liszt: Slavimo slavno Slaveni, Cantus Choir Bratislava

    Eugen Suchoň

    Krútňava – slovenská národná opera (svadobný obraz)

    Ján Cikker

    Ján Cikker, Selanka op.23

    #382031

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Franz Liszt – Slovak father, German mother

    Here is his less well-known piece Slavimo Slavno Slaveni (Let's Celebrate Famous Slavs!) composed for the Millennium celebration of the arrival of Slavic apostles Saint Cyril and Saint Methodius to the area of present-day Slovakia. The celebrations took place in Rome in July 1863, organized by Pope Pius IX; Liszt was personally present.

    F.Liszt: Slavimo slavno Slaveni, Cantus Choir Bratislava

    Great find Svätoslava, it is based on a work of the Serb poet Medo Pucić from Dubrovnik.

    – although the English translated it wrong, it should be 'Slavs, let's celebrate glouriously' (Slavimo Slavno Slaveni).

    #382032

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Great find Svätoslava, it is based on a work of the Serb poet Medo Pucić from Dubrovnik.

    – although the English translated it wrong, it should be 'Slavs, let's celebrate glouriously' (Slavimo Slavno Slaveni).

    Yeah, thanks for additional info.

    #382033

    Anonymous
    #382034

    Anonymous

    Bojarka (from Bojar, the dance of the nobles, court dance) – Vlastimir Pavlovic Carevac (1895-1965) upon an old folk melody
    [hr]

    Bojarka

    Bojarka

    Nacionalni ansambl KOLO: Bojarka

    #382035

    Anonymous

    Zbigniew Preisner (Polish pronunciation: [ˈzbiɡɲɛf ˈpɾajsnɛɾ]; born 20 May 1955 in Bielsko-Biała as Zbigniew Antoni Kowalski) is a Polish film score composer, best known for his work with film director Krzysztof Kieślowski. Zbigniew Preisner studied history and philosophy in Kraków. Never having received formal music lessons, he taught himself music by listening and transcribing parts from records. His compositional style represents a distinctively spare form of tonal neo-Romanticism. Paganini and Jean Sibelius are acknowledged influences.
    [hr]

    [Zbigniew Preisner] translation: Song for the Unification of Europe –  1 Corinthians 13

    – The best piece of composition I heard, it gives me shivers everytime I hear it.

    #382036

    Anonymous

    I'm looking for Classical music that's influenced by slavic folklore music. As far as I know, this was common at the end of the 19th century with composers like Smetana, Dvorak, Tchaikovsky or Rimsky-Korsakov.
    This thread is about Classical music by slavic composers but I'm more interested in classical music influenced by slavic music (which is often found amongst slavic composers, anyway).

    I've found a wikipedia-article on a musical genre called Dumka which seems to be in that same tradition (see here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dumka_%28musical_genre%29)
    I adore the Slavonic Dance(s) by Dvorak, so if anybody's got any suggestions about music like this, post them here.  :)

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