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  • #343717

    Anonymous
    [size=12pt]Slavic Village[/size]

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    [td]Slavic Village is a Cleveland neighborhood, just south of downtown. Bounded by I-77 on the west, E 79th St. on the east, Broadway, and Harvard, the area was first settled in the mid-19th century by primarily Czech and Polish immigrants who came to the city to work in the woolen and steel mills nearby. Today, the area is filled with fun restaurants and food stores, new housing developments, and classic century homes.[/td]
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    History
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    Slavic Village was first settled around 1799 as part of Newburgh township. It was higher than the "flats" areas nearer the Cuyahoga River and thus became popular. Over the next century, the neighborhood was peopled with hundreds of first Welsh and Irish, then Polish and Czech immigrants who arrived to work in the textile and steel mills nearby.

    Demographics
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    Slavic Village is home to approximately 45,000 residents, a large minority of whom are still of Polish or Czech ancestry. You'll still hear Polish spoken in the banks and markets in the neighborhood. The average per capita income is approximately $27,000.

    Housing
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    About half of the homes in Slavic Village are owner-occupied. The others are rental property. However, unlike many other city neighborhoods, most of the landlords live just down the street. New homes are cropping up all over Slavic Village. Notable among them is the Cloisters, a complex of two and three-bedroom townhomes on E 65th Street, arranged in the European fashion around a center courtyard.

    Parks
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    Spacious Washington Park is located at the western end of Fleet Avenue, near I-77. Newly opened in 2006 is an eighteen hole Cleveland Metroparks public golf course. Bike trails in the park connect directly to the Ohio Canal Tow Path Trail.

    Churches
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    Because of its eastern European roots, most of the churches in Slavic Village are Catholic. Among them are:

      [li]St. Stanislaus – A pillar of the neighborhood from the mid-19th century to the present, this magnificent Gothic church is a Polish Shrine church and listed on the National Historic Register.[/li]
      [li]St. John Nepomucene – This 100-year old church was the traditional Czech parish in the neighborhood.[/li]
      [li]Our Lady of Lourdes – This smaller parish near E 55th is beautiful in its quiet simplicity.[/li]

    Celebrating Slavic Village
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    Slavic Village celebrates its eastern European heritage each fall with the annual Harvest Festival. Held the last weekend of August, this three-day celebration features live polka music, dancing, wonderful homemade food, such as pierogi, potato pancakes, and cabbage and noodles, and handcrafted items for sale. The party takes place on Fleet Avenue, which is closed to traffic for the weekend between E 55th and E 65th Streets.

    #390735

    Anonymous

    Unfortunately the area is in decline. Half the population is black and the scum bankers who have ruined entire blocks

    http://tedlandphairsamerica.blogspot.com/2009/04/sad-times-in-slavic-village.html?m=1

    #390736

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Unfortunately the area is in decline. Half the population is black and the **** bankers who have ruined entire blocks

    http://tedlandphairsamerica.blogspot.com/2009/04/sad-times-in-slavic-village.html?m=1

    Rodv,
    Thanks for the link. It is a sobering article. This article is why I am on this forum. I want our Slavic brothers and sisters to learn first-hand what's happening in the West, and how fast it can happen. If they really understand, they can take action and save Eastern Europe from the same fate. The world will create a crushing force against them, but they are strong and intelligent. As long as they truly understand the facts, I believe in them and I believe they can succeed. I have a passion for it.

    #390737

    Anonymous

    Pittsburgh used to have a large population of Czech and Slovaks, and yet today – you won't find many people in that city who'll report their ancestry as Czech / Slovak on the census (only people who kept their identity were the Rusyns / Ukrainians).

    Chances are there are more Slavs in Cleveland but they were thoroughly Americanized / Anglicized.

    #390738

    Anonymous

    The urban areas in the northeast were heavily Slavic, once their kids got a college education and the urban areas started to decline, people left for the suburbs.  To be fair there has been a new wave of immigration since 1991

    #390739

    Anonymous

    Most of the Slovene Americans live in Cleveland (and Chicago).

    http://www.clevelandseniors.com/family/slovenian.htm

    #390740

    Anonymous

    Also heavy Polish and Serbian area for immigrants.  They worked at the steel mills, car factories and industrial plants that made this the center of our strength.  We are now a nation that makes wealth that has no set value and bean counters.  Call me nostalgic, but I miss having my Levis made in Texas and my TV made in Chicago.  Our products lasted for years, except for our cars that is, and gave us good middle class jobs. 

    #390741

    Anonymous

    My Slavic immigrant ancestors (Rusyn) settled in Cleveland as well. I live only about an hour away from Slavic village. It was nice when I was a kid and although they are trying to make a comeback, it is in a terrible area. I would love to go hang out there with my family but there is no way I would do that. Clevelands Little Italy is in much the same boat, totally surrounded by slum.

    #390742

    Anonymous

    Too bad good jobs and strong neighborhoods died out in the North East and Rust Belt.  The cities had a strong sense of community and that got lost when we moved to suburbia.

    #390743

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Too bad good jobs and strong neighborhoods died out in the North East and Rust Belt.  The cities had a strong sense of community and that got lost when we moved to suburbia.

    I go to Cleveland every now and then. It's only like an hour and a half drive away. I know a lot of Croatian people there on the Eastside.  Honestly the city isn't nice at all. Just a typical rust belt trap in the Midwest. We were spared such a fate in Pittsburgh because while the Steel industry declined the Medical industry thrived here and kept Pgh relevant and rich.

    #390744

    Anonymous

    I am located just  on the Ohio side of the PA-OH border about 30 mins north of Youngstown. And speaking of cities that have fone to shit…Youngstown!

    #390745

    Anonymous

    I'm about 35 km from Trenton and that is a horrible dump.  The south end is seeing an influx of Ukrainians and there is a slight revival of the area.  Problem is that two blocks away, there is a Salvation Army homeless shelter. 

    #390746

    Anonymous

    Though Indianapolis, not Cleveland, I won't open another topic just for this vid. Seems interesting. It's abaout the Slovene comunity in a town called Haughville. Pictures Slovenes pretty well: hard working, religious, drinking a lot of beer, dancing polka and eating potica. ;D

    Hoosier History – The Slovenians of Haughville

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