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  • #341597

    Anonymous

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    Jarná príprava osík na stavbu, v pozadí základ zrubu, ktorý sa vystaval na Dvoroch prírodných remesiel roku 7 a takto prezimoval do jari roku 8

    Osík spring training to build in required in the Basic cabin that is made in the yards of natural crafts of 7 and the following winter and spring year 8

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    v pozdnej jari roku 8 pribudlo niekoľko osikových klád

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    nevadí, že sú krivé, ale sú z miestneho kalamitného dreva 

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    a už rastú aj okná

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    oj to je krása – to pribúda

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    bude tu pekný výhľad

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    a už tu máme aj preklad okien – to sadlo

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    majster Bredy sa činí

    #349222

    Anonymous

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    a takto zrub prezimoval do roku 9

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    Dvory prírodných remesiel roku 9 – začína sa rysovať strecha – to už sú pekne rovné smreky – takisto z miesneho zdroja – chlapi sa pekne opálili

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    hurá – prvá strešná krokva

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    Už sú tri – to ide!

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    to vyzerá ako strecha!

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    tu už sa dá skoro bývať

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    to nemá chybu

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    na jar roku 10 – krásne zátišie

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    prišiel rad na laty na šindle

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    toľko ich je treba?

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    prvý rad

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    prvý roh

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    podaj

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    pekné obliny

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    podlomenica skoro hotová

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    už som takmer hore

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    radosť pozrieť

    #349223

    Anonymous

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    koľko ich je?

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    niektoré treba dokresať

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    čakáreň

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    slnko rozohralo hru svetla a tieňov

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    fin

    source: http://www.ved.sk/ObrZrub.htm

    #349224

    Anonymous

    http://tv.sme.sk/v/18305/dnesne-drevenice-odbornik-by-krutil-hlavou.html

    František Lajčin (83), a carpenter from region Orava (Slovakia) talking about Slovak wooden houses drevenice. Nehaňte ľud môj is an Internet telecast about old people and actually the only one in SME masmedium which I can watch… SME is not objective fair-minded newspaper.
    Although I suppose you will not understand, you can just watch :P E.g. he says, the wood is better for living than the wall and this already knew our ancestors that the wood's got better heat value than brick – it's warm in drevenica in winter and cold in summer. They need no polystyrene as modern houses do (because they're impractical built). Filler is actually a moss. If is it enough? Mr. Lajčin says yes. Drevenice are indeed highly stable, it's very hard to demolish them. If you want to demount them, you have to begin at the roof step by step. He himself lived in drevenica long years, which was built in 1903 and it was demolished in 1966. Mr. Lajčin says it was not necessary, his house would outlast 30 years more. Simply said, the era of walls had come.
    While talking about his handicraft, he mentioned his old axes (sekera and topor). Axes are made of high-class steel which is not possible to buy any more (it's not producted so qualitative as it was in old times).
    He was present by foundation of the Orava's outdoor museum in the 1960s.

    I love drevenice so much :)

    #349225

    Anonymous

    You will not survive in such house in our North!
    You have to build something like that: http://www.vodaspb.ru/russian/files/books/20040803-family/09-Izba_3-Small_Korels.jpg

    how to construct such a house is good written here http://www.rus-plotnik.ru/building/?prod_id=273

    #349226

    Anonymous

    Excellent thread, Pentaz! Very interesting.

    I couldn't help notice indeed as you mentioned, how similar Croatian is to Slovak. Theory of White Chrobatia is no doubt origin of Croats of today, I think. Even in terms of looks there is similarities. I really could understand large number of what was written here. Being any kind of Slavic rules!

    #349227

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    You will not survive in such house in our North!

    Why not? Too cold? People have survived in them in cold mountainous regions.
    Every land's got its particularities.

    #349228

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    You will not survive in such house in our North!
    You have to build something like that: http://www.vodaspb.ru/russian/files/books/20040803-family/09-Izba_3-Small_Korels.jpg

    how to construct such a house is good written here http://www.rus-plotnik.ru/building/?prod_id=273

    Well, i think you could…thought the house on pictures is just a weekend place to be, of course if you plan to live there you'd have to make a bigger house as the one in link you posted. Besides, if people survived with living in a cave, they surely would survive in a fine made lodge house :D

    #349229

    Anonymous
    Quote:

    Quote:
    You will not survive in such house in our North!

    Why not? Too cold? People have survived in them in cold mountainous regions.
    Every land's got its particularities.

    You can easy see large holes between logs. In Northern Russia people set logs without any gap. Look a picture [img width=500 height=318]http://www.vodaspb.ru/russian/files/books/20040803-family/09-Izba_3-Small_Korels.jpg” />

    #349230

    Anonymous

    .. and that is a proof, people couldn't survive in Slovak drevenica in Russia?

    #349231

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    You can easy see large holes between logs. In Northern Russia people set logs without any gap. Look a picture [img width=500 height=318]http://www.vodaspb.ru/russian/files/books/20040803-family/09-Izba_3-Small_Korels.jpg” />

    Oh, come on, do you really think that those gaps will not be filled? And by the way, this style is just among many others styles used in Slovakia and we use also that style you posted on picture. Anyway, you would not survive winter here in Slovakia with such gaps between timber. You know, Slovakia is located more to the south than Russia, but is as well located higher above see level. So the winter in lets say Orava region is quite freezing

    #349232

    Anonymous

    So how do they fill the gaps between the logs ?

    #349233

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    So how do they fill the gaps between the logs ?

    Usually it is straw in the midle, plastered on both sides by clay covered with lime plaster on both sides of the gap, facing with timber.
    There used to be other technologies as well, but the one described above was the most frequented.

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