• This topic has 11 voices and 13 replies.
Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #343823

    Anonymous

    1.1 Linguistic, geographic and economic description

    Czech in Austria is currently spoken almost exclusively in Vienna (above all in districts III, V, X, XI, XV, XVII, XX and XXI), even though a hundred years ago there were important groups of Czech speakers in many localities of Lower Austria.

    It is a western Slav language. Viennese Czech (see Fisher 1968) is written in conformity with the norm of the motherland, even though its popular variety reflects the particular dialects of the regions of immigration (Central Bohemia and Moravia), and include a number of interferences with German. All the Viennese Czechs master German in addition to Czech, their degree of bilingualism varying from one individual to the other (most of the time with the dominance of German).

    The number of Viennese Czechs diminished after 1918 and after 1945, more than 150,000 people returned to Czechoslovakia after 1918. According to the latest census of 1991 (we do not have access to the recent surveys), there are about 10,000 people who use Czech (in comparison with 300,000 people in 1910, or 15% of the total population). However, for various reasons, official surveys and the census do not constitute adequate means for measuring the influence of minorities or of linguistic communities. At the time of the census or of the linguistic surveys there existed an atmosphere of linguistic and ethnic struggle. Taking into account the political cleavages among the Viennese Czechs which have existed for decades (notably for reasons of political evolution in Czechoslovakia since 1948), many Czech speakers refuse to recognise their Czech ethnicity. Placed in the position of having to identify themselves in the linguistic census, and thereby to make a gesture of linguistic loyalty, they choose not to associate with the values of their political adversaries.

    If one adjusts the official figures by taking these considerations into account, there are at least 20,000 speakers of Czech in Vienna, that is about 2% of the total population of the capital.

    1.2 General history of the region and the language

    The Czechs (consisting mainly of artisans, workers and unemployed) were displaced in the 19th century by important waves in the context where the capital of the Habsburg Empire was in expansion, with some of the immigrants remaining whereas others returned to the countryside. They were employed in Vienna in the construction, industrial and service (auxiliary aids, cooks, receptionists etc.) sectors where they established their own family enterprises (the typical professions of the Viennese Czechs are as tailors, cobblers, carpenters). At the beginning of the second half of the 19th century, the Czechs in Vienna founded many associations (sporting, educational, leisure, or for the defence of their interests), and also political parties; they created theatre groups, and Czech was taught in the schools of Vienna very early. Because of the mainly proletarian background of the Czech immigrants and of the status of the Czechs under the monarchy, the Czechs enjoyed little prestige in Vienna. The Czechs of Vienna enjoyed a period of grace prior to the First World War. During the period of Austrian fascism and under the Nazi regime the Viennese Czechs, mainly the social democrats and the Communists, were victims of oppression. The first uprising against the Nazi regime derived from among the ranks of the Viennese Czechs, who experienced considerable loss of life during the Nazi period. The movement of Czechoslovak refugees after 1948 only contributed a small number of people to the Viennese Czechs, since generally the 'new' migrants could not identify with the 'older' immigrants (essentially linked to the workers movement). From the start the infrastructure of the Viennese Czechs was orientated towards Czechoslovakia. During the monarchy Slovakia pertained to the Hungarian part of the Empire and the migration towards Vienna was quantitatively less than that of the Czechs. In general, one can say that the different ethnic groups did not constitute closed groups in Vienna, but that they lived mainly as a function of their social relations and their employment conditions.

    The institutional life of the Czechs in Vienna was orientated towards Czechoslovakia, reflecting its historic development. After 1945 the central Czech Committee (Cseky ustredni vybor/Tschechischer Zentralausschus) was founded within which all of the political movements were represented. After 1948 there was a division of the ethnic group. The largest part rejected co-operation with the Communist regime in Prague and sought refuge in the umbrella organisation of the Council of Czech and Slovak minority ethnic groups in Austria (Mensinová rada èeské a slovenské vìtve v Rakousku/Minderheitsrat der tschechischen und slowakischen Volksgruppe in Österreich) which united several other groups. On the other side, the umbrella group sympathetic to the Communist authorities in Prague was constituted as the Union of Czechs and Slovaks in Austria (Sdru ení Èechù a Slovákù v Rakousku/Vereinigung der Tschechen und Slowaken in Österreich); in 1974 the Cultural Club of the Czechs and Slovaks (Sdru ení Èechù a Slovákù v Rakousku/Vereinigung der Tschechen und Slowaken in Österreich) was founded, as a forum for emigrants from Czechoslovakia (in 1968 and subsequently). For easily understood reasons there was little collaboration between the two sides prior to 1989. It was not until the beginning of the 1990s that this relationship was stabilised.

    #392047

    Anonymous

    Interesting. Good thread. I know there was realy strong immigration of Czechs into other Austrian crown lands during 18th – 19th century and even before and after. :)

    #392048

    Anonymous

    Yes indeed, and I have to add two things. The article is relativly old. Unfortunalty today the Czech as a spoken language in Vienna has almost died out, apart from recent immigrants who naturally use it.
    But the number of Czech descendants in Vienna and Lower Austria is definitly much higher.
    But many only bear a Czech name and have been Germanised in all other cultural aspects.

    #392049

    Anonymous

    Yeah, I Vienna is lots of Czechoslovaks. I have in Vienna lots of friend and family. I want learn German and move work to Vienna.

    Austria is better than Czech Republic, better paymend, shop is cheaper, home is cheaper,..

    In Vienna is Czechoslovak School – http://www.komensky.at/

    What bezirk is most Cz/SK?

    #392050

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    What bezirk is most Cz/SK?

    I'd say Rudolfsheim-Fünfhaus.

    #392051

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I'd say Rudolfsheim-Fünfhaus.

    Do you live in Vienna?

    #392052

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I'd say Rudolfsheim-Fünfhaus.

    I don`t live in Vienna too, but I have been there several times.
    From my own observation the 10th district Favoriten has been the epicentre of Czech migration
    100 years ago. Because here the traditional industry where they were engaged is located and there was cheap accomodation available
    I estimate there almost 50% of residents have Czech origins.
    But nowadays also many immigrants from other countries settled in this part of the town.

    Rudolsheim Fünfhaus is the district with the highest percentage of immigrants, but that
    does not mean many Czechs live there.

    #392053

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Interesting. Good thread. I know there was realy strong immigration of Czechs into other Austrian crown lands during 18th – 19th century and even before and after. :)

    Were the Czechs who moved to Austria in the 18th-19th century Germanised Czechs? OR could any Czech move to Austria proper?

    #392054

    Anonymous

    Many members of my family were Viennese Czechs. My Great Grandma used to work as a bank teller in a 'Czech' bank in Vienna.

    Interesting articles about the Czechs in Vienna:

    A wave of immigrants around 1900: http://www.porges.net/CzechsInVienna/CzechsInVienna1.html

    The battle for the Nibelung district: http://www.porges.net/CzechsInVienna/CzechsInVienna2.html

    The battle for the Komensky schools: http://www.porges.net/CzechsInVienna/CzechsInVienna3.html

    Attempts at mediation: http://www.porges.net/CzechsInVienna/CzechsInVienna4.html

    Hitler on the Czechs: http://www.porges.net/CzechsInVienna/CzechsInVienna5.html

    Hitler about the Czechs:

    "Every Czech is a born nationalist who subjugates his interests to all other obligations. One must not let oneself be deceived, the more he bends, the more dangerous he becomes."

    "…Of all the Slavs, the Czech is the most dangerous one, because he is diligent. He has discipline, is orderly, he is more Mongoloid than Slavic ;D. He knows how to hide his plans behind a certain loyalty. …I don't despise them , it is a battle of destinies. An alien racial splinter has penetrated our folkdom, and one must yield, he or we. …That's one of the reasons why the Hapsburgs perished. They believed they could solve the problem through kindness." 

    #392055

    Anonymous

    Vienna in all Roman maps was called WENDENNIA. City of the wends , or more precisely city of the Slavic people. Slavs had lose Vienna or Wendenna to the Vatican Lead coalition of German Dojcers.
    Slavic people had lived IN HUN GARY, before it was Tourkicized by the Western Lords,  AND IN DACIA – before it was Romanian and latinised 100 percent.
    Western Slavic do not recognize this issues, since they believe the mambo jambo crap history that is written from the City of London and Vatican.
    If you do not believe me, just read the names of all Eastern German  cities and rivers, and villages, and YOU WILL UNDERSTAND that they were Slavic 1000 years ago.

    Yes, Slavic  people had been taken for a ride.

    Even today when we speak, Slavic people of SERBIAN Kosovo, are ERASED by so called "Western Alliance" and Replaced by Albanian-Dagestani people. With the appliance of Colonial Protectorate of governments of Czech, Poland, Croatia, Slovenia…even from MonteNegro and Macedonia, although they are next on the line to be replaced.

    Boromir,  Macedonia

    #392056

    Anonymous
    Quote:

    "…Of all the Slavs, the Czech is the most dangerous one, because he is diligent. He has discipline, is orderly, he is more Mongoloid than Slavic ;D. He knows how to hide his plans behind a certain loyalty. …I don't despise them , it is a battle of destinies. An alien racial splinter has penetrated our folkdom, and one must yield, he or we. …That's one of the reasons why the Hapsburgs perished. They believed they could solve the problem through kindness."

    Roflmao ;D

    Brb Czech tourists in Vienna
    image  :D

    #392057

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Interesting. Good thread. I know there was realy strong immigration of Czechs into other Austrian crown lands during 18th – 19th century and even before and after. :)

    Very true. My great grandfather was one of those Czech immigrants to Sarajevo.

    #392058

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Roflmao ;D

    Brb Czech tourists in Vienna
    image  :D
    They may be from Czech republic but there are a number of immigrants from Vietnam.

    #392059

    Anonymous
    Quote:

    Japanse tourists. From Japan.

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.