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  • #346161

    Anonymous

    I haven't realized that some expressions my relatives used often probably came from the old Slavic pagan god: Dažbog (Proto-Slavic: *dadjьbogъ, Serbo-Croatian: Dabog, Daždbog, Dajbog; Bulgarian: Даждбог, Polish: Dadźbóg, Russian: Даж(д)ьбог, Ukrainian: Дажбог), alternatively Dazhbog, Dazbog, Dazhdbog, or Dadzbóg, was one of the major gods of Slavic mythology, most likely a solar deity and possibly a cultural hero. He is one of several authentic Slavic gods, mentioned by a number of medieval manuscripts, and one of the few Slavic gods for which evidence of worship can be found in all Slavic nations.

    ne da bog: with an equivalent meaning in English of "heaven forbid" or "oh my god"
    dajbog or dajbože, dabogda: an equivalent expression in English "may God grant" or "hope to god".

    #425690

    Anonymous

    I would assume it's more related to Christianity since it looks like it's only referring to one god (Bog/God).

    #425691

    Anonymous

    Don't forget ' Boze sacuvaj'  lol

    #425692

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I would assume it's more related to Christianity since it looks like it's only referring to one god (Bog/God).

    It would be one God- the Dajbog. :)

    #425693

    Anonymous

    "Bože Spasi" could mean "God Spasoje" He was supreme god in Mali Mokri Lug :P
    joke aside, it is not good idea to search possible connections to paganism in everything. It may banalize more serious researches.

    #425694

    Anonymous

    The Boze spasi and Sacuvaj Bog I can agree are probably related to Christianity. The other one is definitely related to the old Slavic pagan God that was carried on in tradition by the Serbs. Even the article mentions: that he was "one of the few Slavic gods for which evidence of worship can be found in all Slavic nations". I just wonder if other Slavs have the same Serbian expressions relating to "da" which means give.

    #425695

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    It would be one God- the Dajbog. :)

    Pagan Slavs were polytheistic.

    #425696

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I just wonder if other Slavs have the same Serbian expressions relating to "da" which means give.

    Yeah , other south Slavs do for sure. We wouldn't call them 'Serbian expressions' though . :P

    Also I don't think 'da Bog' expression is really related to 'Dazbog' as in a Slavic god. I think its a typical expression which refers to a monotheistic god just like in other languages. 'God forbid'  etc.

    #425697

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Also I don't think 'da Bog' expression is really related to 'Dazbog' as in a Slavic god. I think its a typical expression which refers to a monotheistic god just like in other languages. 'God forbid'  etc.

    I don't know about that.
    His very name, "Dajbog" essentially means 'The Giving God', or something along those lines.
    It would make sense, then, that this god was somehow associated with perhaps, giving gifts of luck, or maybe even some kind of wealth.
    So sayings such as "nek' bog da" or "dajbog" "dajbože" "da bog da" could very well be directly referring to this old Slavic Deity, whose very name is associated with giving.

    In contrast to that, the God of The Bible doesn't give all that much, does he?

    -[size=8pt] Petar Skok (1971), Etimologijski rječnik hrvatskoga ili srpskoga jezika, JAZU: Zagreb, volume I, page 178ff[/size]

    #425698

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I don't know about that.
    His very name, "Dajbog" essentially means 'The Giving God', or something along those lines.
    It would make sense, then, that this god was somehow associated with perhaps, giving gifts of luck, or maybe even some kind of wealth.
    So sayings such as "nek' bog da" or "dajbog" "dajbože" "da bog da" could very well be directly referring to this old Slavic Deity, whose very name is associated with giving.

    In contrast to that, the God of The Bible doesn't give all that much, does he?

    The phrase "may god" exists in many languages where the speakers are largely followers of one of the Abrahamic religions. Also, the phrase claims there is one god which goes against Slavic polytheism idea of multiple gods. I just don't see how they are related.

    #425699

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    The phrase "may god" exists in many languages where the speakers are largely followers of one of the Abrahamic religions. Also, the phrase claims there is one god which goes against Slavic polytheism idea of multiple gods. I just don't see how they are related.

    Well, not quite.
    They're referring to one god.
    This in no way means that they are claiming the others don't exist, they're talking about a god, the one that gives.

    #425700

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Well, not quite.
    They're referring to one god.
    This in no way means that they are claiming the others don't exist, they're talking about a god, the one that gives.

    It's 'may God' not 'may a god'

    #425701

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    It's 'may God' not 'may a god'

    You can't compare the word "God" with "Bog".
    The word "god", for almost the entire history of the word in this general form, has been used to refer specifically to the god of the Jews.
    On the other hand, the word 'bog' has been used in this way for but a thousand or so years.

    So this saying came into being upon Christianity reaching our ancestors? I think not.
    That's the only way it could have anything to do with Christianity.

    Otherwise, it's talking about one of many gods, most likely Dajbog.

    The form, 'bog', is indeed talking about one god, and I've read over and over again that Dajbog was the 'supreme' god of the Serbs.
    It is then, very different, and makes more sense.

    #425702

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    You can't compare the word "God" with "Bog".

    Yes I can.

    Quote:
    The word "god", for almost the entire history of the word in this general form, has been used to refer specifically to the god of the Jews. On the other hand, the word 'bog' has been used in this way for but a thousand or so years.

    Both mean god, God of Abraham and deity.

    Quote:
    So this saying came into being upon Christianity reaching our ancestors? I think not.
    That's the only way it could have anything to do with Christianity.

    Probably. Though it's unlikely that it has anything to do with Dajbog. What about the phrase "ako Bog da"? It follows the same pattern of using "bog" as reference to the God of Abraham.

    Quote:
    Otherwise, it's talking about one of many gods, most likely Dajbog.

    Why would it have anything to do with this particular god? What is the logic?

    Quote:
    The form, 'bog', is indeed talking about one god, and I've read over and over again that Dajbog was the 'supreme' god of the Serbs.

    Who says this? According to most Slavists Perun was at the top of the pantheon, though I'm not sure how we know these things since pre-Christian Slavs did not write down these things so we can only assume.

    #425703

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Yes I can.

    Both mean god, God of Abraham and deity.

    They're so, so different though. If you take the literal definitions of both words, sure. The connotations of these words are not the same.

    Probably. Though it's unlikely that it has anything to do with Dajbog. What about the phrase "ako Bog da"? It follows the same pattern of using "bog" as reference to the God of Abraham.

    Serbians now are for the most part Christians, so naturally, any expression would be modified to suit. In general, where the word 'bog' is involved, you can be sure that people used those exact sayings before Christianity. Perhaps 'bogovi' was used instead of 'bog', or perhaps they were referring to a supreme god.

    Why would it have anything to do with this particular god? What is the logic?

    I explained it ^ above. He is the god who gives.

    Who says this? According to most Slavists Perun was at the top of the pantheon, though I'm not sure how we know these things since pre-Christian Slavs did not write down these things so we can only assume.

    This varied greatly among different groups of Slavs, it seems. If you search this forum you'll find people talking about it, Cvetinov in particular. I can't remember where I read it, but it has come from numerous sources, that's all I can say at this point.
    In any case, I am absent strong feelings on this matter, I'm playing the devil's advocate more than anything.
    Done is done, we'll never know.

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