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  • #344779

    Anonymous

    Yes or no?

    Mine did not. There was no distinction between vowels that were supposed to be 'short' and 'long'.

    #405366

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Yes or no?

    Mine did not. There was no distinction between vowels that were supposed to be 'short' and 'long'.

    No they didn't. But, here not even teachers of Serbian make distinction altough differece exists. Only in Greek we made differece, altought it has more with fact that, there was difference in writting.

    #405367

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Yes or no?

    Mine did not. There was no distinction between vowels that were supposed to be 'short' and 'long'.

    I'm so glad I never had Latin

    #405368

    Anonymous

    My school teaches Latin, but the kids never take it to learn the language, but to do better on entrance exams for medical or law school.

    #405369

    Anonymous

    yes, she (teacher  :) ) did make the difference. same goes for accent. however, it wasnt taken into account on exam (written exam) except for cases where long vowel changes meaning of word.

    #405370

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    yes, she (teacher  :) ) did make the difference. same goes for accent. however, it wasnt taken into account on exam (written exam) except for cases where long vowel changes meaning of word.

    What is your ethnicity? Does your language make the distinction between long and short vowels?

    #405371

    Anonymous

    yes, official slovak has got long/short vowels and diphtongs. my language has got only short vowels, however accent is stably penultimate, generally similar to that of latin (except accent in latin is movable)

    #405372

    Anonymous

    I don't get it, classical latin pronounciation is supposed to be unknown to us, as such every nationality pronounces latin differently (i.e. closely to the phonetic system of their own mother tongue).

    I studied latin in an Italian school therefore we read it like we would read standard Italian; however we did make distinction between short and long vowels as it was a very important feature of old latin ('tis in fact the first thing we learned), I am very surprised here people did not, since the lenght of vowels could change the meaning of some words, a classic example would be –

    vĕnit – he comes
    vēnit – he came

    #405373

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I don't get it, classical latin pronounciation is supposed to be unknown to us, as such every nationality pronounces latin differently (i.e. closely to the phonetic system of their own mother tongue).

    Not exactly, because:
    1. Classical Latin is the best attested ancient language.
    2. It had left many different daughter languages.
    3. Many words were borrowed from/to Latin at various times.
    4. AFAIK Romans made some works dedicated to their own language.
    5. We have linguistics.

    Using these five we can actually reconstruct the ancient pronunciation very well.

    #405374

    Anonymous
    #405375

    Anonymous
    Quote:

    A fine educational video about Latin! ;D

    #405376

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    1. Classical Latin is the best attested ancient language.

    This alone doesn't mean anything. It explains our relative knowledge of latin in comparison with other ancient languages, nothing more.

    Quote:
    2. It had left many different daughter languages.

    I was speaking about CLASSICAL latin. All the Romance languages evolved form the various latin vulgars scattered through the empire.

    Quote:
    3. Many words were borrowed from/to Latin at various times.

    This is true.

    Quote:
    4. AFAIK Romans made some works dedicated to their own language.

    Those works were highly ambigous, especially regarding phonetics. Not only that, but pronounciation differed greatly through history, that's why renaissance scholars had a hard time to make lectio restituta of latin; to complicate matters additionally there are different official reconstructions.

    Different European universities favour different versions; Italian universities favour ecclesiastical latin pronounciation.

    Quote:
    5. We have linguistics.

    Linguistics, not sorcery.

    #405377

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    This alone doesn't mean anything. It explains our relative knowledge of latin in comparison with other ancient languages, nothing more.

    Combined with all other points it is very important. The Latin vocabulary is huge.

    I was speaking about CLASSICAL latin. All the Romance languages evolved form the various latin vulgars scattered through the empire.

    Without modern Romance pronunciation we wouldn't be able to reconstruct the ancient one.

    Different European universities favour different versions; Italian universities favour ecclesiastical latin pronounciation.

    Probably because it's how most of their lecturers pronounce it.

    Linguistics, not sorcery.

    Reconstruction is not sorcery. Given the *huge* amount of data (from the five points I've posted), it can be made very well. Eg. when something is pronounced [tʃ] before front vowels, we *know* that the sound had to be [k] once. We know from Indo-European studies (and Greek borrowings) that the ae diphtong was pronounces [aj] in Classical Latin, etc.

    #405378

    Anonymous

    I study history and yes, my teacher did.

    #405379

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I don't get it, classical latin pronounciation is supposed to be unknown to us, as such every nationality pronounces latin differently (i.e. closely to the phonetic system of their own mother tongue).

    Nevertheless the classical pronunciation can be reconstructed accurately enough. However many scholars don't see the accuracy as necessary and treat Latin as mainly written language.

    Quote:
    I study history and yes, my teacher did.

    What about the textbooks you used? Did their authors pay attention to this distinction? (Question to anyone who feels like answering it.)

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