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  • #346586

    Anonymous

    The article on Slovak, Ruthenian and Serbian populations from Vojvodina. Full-text is attached.

    Northern Slavs from Serbia do not show a founder effect at autosomal and Y-chromosomal STRs and retain their paternal genetic heritage (2013)

    Krzysztof Rębała, Igor Veselinović, Daniela Siváková, Erika Patskun, Sergey Kravchenko, and Zofia Szczerkowska
    Forensic Science International: Genetics, 2014-01-01, Volume 8, Issue 1, Pages 126-131

    Abstract
    Studies on Y-chromosomal markers revealed significant genetic differentiation between Southern and Northern (Western and Eastern) Slavic populations. The northern Serbian region of Vojvodina is inhabited by Southern Slavic Serbian majority and, inter alia, Western Slavic (Slovak) and Eastern Slavic (Ruthenian) minorities. In the study, 15 autosomal STR markers were analysed in unrelated Slovaks, Ruthenians and Serbs from northern Serbia and western Slovakia. Additionally, Slovak males from Serbia were genotyped for 17 Y-chromosomal STR loci. The results were compared to data available for other Slavic populations. Genetic distances for autosomal markers revealed homogeneity between Serbs from northern Serbia and Slovaks from western Slovakia and distinctiveness of Serbian Slovaks and Ruthenians. Y-STR variation showed a clear genetic departure of the Slovaks and Ruthenians inhabiting Vojvodina from their Serbian neighbours and genetic similarity to the Northern Slavic populations of Slovakia and Ukraine. Admixture estimates revealed negligible Serbian paternal ancestry in both Northern Slavic minorities of Vojvodina, providing evidence for their genetic isolation from the Serbian majority population. No reduction of genetic diversity at autosomal and Y-chromosomal markers was found, excluding genetic drift as a reason for differences observed at autosomal STRs. Analysis of molecular variance detected significant population stratification of autosomal and Y-chromosomal microsatellites in the three Slavic populations of northern Serbia, indicating necessity for separate databases used for estimations of frequencies of autosomal and Y-chromosomal STR profiles in forensic casework. Our results demonstrate that regarding Y-STR haplotypes, Serbian Slovaks and Ruthenians fit in the Eastern European metapopulation defined in the Y chromosome haplotype reference database.

    #432404

    Anonymous

    Full-text is available

    Uniparental Genetic Heritage of Belarusians: Encounter of Rare Middle Eastern Matrilineages with a Central European Mitochondrial DNA Pool (2013), Alena Kushniarevich et al.

    Abstract

    Ethnic Belarusians make up more than 80% of the nine and half million people inhabiting the Republic of Belarus. Belarusians together with Ukrainians and Russians represent the East Slavic linguistic group, largest both in numbers and territory, inhabiting East Europe alongside Baltic-, Finno-Permic- and Turkic-speaking people. Till date, only a limited number of low resolution genetic studies have been performed on this population. Therefore, with the phylogeographic analysis of 565 Y-chromosomes and 267 mitochondrial DNAs from six well covered geographic sub-regions of Belarus we strove to complement the existing genetic profile of eastern Europeans. Our results reveal that around 80% of the paternal Belarusian gene pool is composed of R1a, I2a and N1c Y-chromosome haplogroups – a profile which is very similar to the two other eastern European populations – Ukrainians and Russians. The maternal Belarusian gene pool encompasses a full range of West Eurasian haplogroups and agrees well with the genetic structure of central-east European populations. Our data attest that latitudinal gradients characterize the variation of the uniparentally transmitted gene pools of modern Belarusians. In particular, the Y-chromosome reflects movements of people in central-east Europe, starting probably as early as the beginning of the Holocene. Furthermore, the matrilineal legacy of Belarusians retains two rare mitochondrial DNA haplogroups, N1a3 and N3, whose phylogeographies were explored in detail after de novo sequencing of 20 and 13 complete mitogenomes, respectively, from all over Eurasia. Our phylogeographic analyses reveal that two mitochondrial DNA lineages, N3 and N1a3, both of Middle Eastern origin, might mark distinct events of matrilineal gene flow to Europe: during the mid-Holocene period and around the Pleistocene-Holocene transition, respectively.

    Y-DNA frequencies, sample size 565

    mtDNA frequencies , sample size 267

    #432405

    Anonymous

    Full-text is attached.

    Croatian national reference Y-STR haplotype database (2012), Gordan Mršić et al.

    Abstract
    A reference Y-chromosome short tandem repeat (STR) haplotype database is needed for Y-STR match interpretation as well as for national and regional characterization of populations. The aim of this study was to create a comprehensive Y-STR haplotype database of the Croatian contemporary population and to analyze substructure between the five Croatian regions. We carried out a statistical analysis of the data from previously performed genetic analyses collected during routine forensic work by the Forensic Science Centre “Ivan Vučetić”. A total of 1,100 unrelated men from eastern, western, northern, southern and central Croatia were selected for the purpose of this study. Y-STRs were typed using the AmpFISTR Yfiler PCR amplification kit. Analysis of molecular variance calculated with the Y chromosome haplotype reference database online analysis tool included 16 population samples with 20,247 haplotypes. A total of 947 haplotypes were recorded, 848 of which were unique (89.5%). Haplotype diversity was 0.998, with the most frequent haplotype found in 9 of 1,100 men (0.82%). Locus diversity varied from 0.266 for DYS392 to 0.868 for DYS385. Discrimination capacity was 86.1%. Our results suggested high level of similarity among regional subpopulations within Croatia, except for mildly different southern Croatia. Relative resemblance was found with Bosnia and Herzegovina and Serbia. Whit Atheys’ Haplogroup Predictor was used to estimate the frequencies of Y-chromosome haplogroups. I2a, R1a, E1b1b and R1b haplogroups were most frequent in all Croatian regions. These results are important in forensics and contribute to the population genetics and genetic background of the contemporary Croatian population.

    Supplimentary material

    Y-chromosome haplogroup composition.

    #432406

    Anonymous

    Full-text of the article.

    Most up to date study on R1a haplogroup co-authored by 32 scientists.

    The phylogenetic and geographic structure of Y-chromosome haplogroup R1a (2014) Peter Underhill et al.

    Abstract

    R1a-M420 is one of the most widely spread Y-chromosome haplogroups; however, its substructure within Europe and Asia has remained poorly characterized. Using a panel of 16 244 male subjects from 126 populations sampled across Eurasia, we identified 2923 R1a-M420 Y-chromosomes and analyzed them to a highly granular phylogeographic resolution. Whole Y-chromosome sequence analysis of eight R1a and five R1b individuals suggests a divergence time of ~25 000 (95% CI: 21 300–29 000) years ago and a coalescence time within R1a-M417 of ~5800 (95% CI: 4800–6800) years. The spatial frequency distributions of R1a sub-haplogroups conclusively indicate two major groups, one found primarily in Europe and the other confined to Central and South Asia. Beyond the major European versus Asian dichotomy, we describe several younger sub-haplogroups. Based on spatial distributions and diversity patterns within the R1a-M420 clade, particularly rare basal branches detected primarily within Iran and eastern Turkey, we conclude that the initial episodes of haplogroup R1a diversification likely occurred in the vicinity of present-day Iran.

    A discussion of the article in Dienekes blog : http://dienekes.blogspot.com/2014/03/major-new-article-on-deep-origins-of-y.html

    [img width=665 height=700]http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-U25KKODqD8M/UzN-UTI-ImI/AAAAAAAAJiE/rzY2454L22k/s1600/ejhg201450f1.jpg” />

    [img width=554 height=700]http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Jo4YVdHcczM/UzN-U6CtGnI/AAAAAAAAJiI/-cIin5Gh4Ow/s1600/ejhg201450f2.jpg” />

    image

    Principal component analysis of R1a subclades

    [img width=700 height=470]http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-IpQjRAY4Sz8/UzN-VYES84I/AAAAAAAAJic/qN7oHY2ElNI/s1600/ejhg201450f4.jpg” />

    #432407

    Anonymous

    R1a and R1a subclades frequencies in 126 populations of the world which include many eastern and central European populations. The table is from the latest article on the subject : The phylogenetic and geographic structure of Y-chromosome haplogroup R1a (2014) Peter Underhill et al.

    http://www.nature.com/ejhg/journal/vaop/ncurrent/extref/ejhg201450x5.xls

    #432408

    Anonymous

    huh, we have more E1b than I thought. That's "Greek" commonly right?

    #432409

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    huh, we have more E1b than I thought. That's "Greek" commonly right?

    more Ilyrian than Greek IMO
    I mean here in northern parts of Balkans.

    #432410

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    huh, we have more E1b than I thought. That's "Greek" commonly right?

    AFAIK, in Europe  it's more common in southern European countries.

    #432411

    Anonymous

    An article on colonisation of Europe by neolithic farmers .

    Full text : http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2014/06/04/1320811111.full.pdf+html

    Abstract
    The Neolithic populations, which colonized Europe approximately 9,000 y ago, presumably migrated from Near East to Anatolia and from there to Central Europe through Thrace and the Balkans. An alternative route would have been island hopping across the Southern European coast. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed genome-wide DNA polymorphisms on populations bordering the Mediterranean coast and from Anatolia and mainland Europe. We observe a striking structure correlating genes with geography around the Mediterranean Sea with characteristic east to west clines of gene flow. Using population network analysis, we also find that the gene flow from Anatolia to Europe was through Dodecanese, Crete, and the Southern European coast, compatible with the hypothesis that a maritime coastal route was mainly used for the migration of Neolithic farmers to Europe.

    #432412

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    more Ilyrian than Greek IMO
    I mean here in northern parts of Balkans.

    Isn't I2a "Illyrian/Thracian" or "Balkans"? R1a I believed was more "Eastern European/Steppic" and E1b was more "South Balkans/Greek-Albanian".

    #432413

    Anonymous

    NONCRITICAL APPLICATION OF GENETICS!!!

    #432414

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Isn't I2a "Illyrian/Thracian" or "Balkans"? R1a I believed was more "Eastern European/Steppic" and E1b was more "South Balkans/Greek-Albanian".

    I2 came on Balkans in the same time as R1a. from what I know, the most subclade diversity is found in Ukraine, so we can conditionaly tagg it as "Slavic"
    Ev13 is not "Greek" nor "Albanian". it is simply Balkan native haplogroup. I believe that Slavs in Northern Balkans simply exterminated large portion of male E carriers while the rest were asimilated.

    #432415

    Anonymous

    The paternal perspective of the Slovenian population and its relationship with other populations (2013)
    Andrej Zupan, Katarina Vrabec, and Damjan Glavac

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/7gqopwqtdjhyuq3/Glavac-Ann-Hum-Biol-2013.pdf

    Abstract

    Background: The Slovenian territory is geographically positioned between the Alps, the Adriatic Sea, the Pannonian basin and the Dinaric Mountains and, as such, has served as a passageway for different populations over different periods of time. Turbulent historic events and the diverse geography of the region have produced a diverse contemporary population whose genetic analysis could provide insight into past demographic events.
    Aim: The aim of this study was to analyse Y-chromosome biallelic and STR markers in a Slovenian population from five different regions.
    Subjects and methods: A total of 42 Y-chromosomal biallelic markers and 17 Y-STRs were genotyped in 399 individuals from five different Slovenian regions.
    Results: The analysis of Y-chromosome markers revealed 29 different haplogroups in the Slovenian population, with the most common being R1a1a (36.2%), R1b (20.3%), I2a1 (13%) and I1 (11.9%) . Analysis of the genetic affiliations between different populations revealed strong affiliations of the Slovenian gene pool with West Slavic populations.
    Conclusion: Analysis of Y-chromosomal markers in five Slovenian regions revealed a diverse
    genetic landscape. Slovenian population display close genetic affiliations with West Slavic
    populations. The homogenous genetic strata of the West Slavic populations and the Slovenian
    population suggest the existence of a common ancestral Slavic population in central European region.

    [img width=700 height=616]http://oi59.tinypic.com/2drrmf4.jpg” />

    #432416

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    [img width=700 height=616]http://oi59.tinypic.com/2drrmf4.jpg” />

    I really like it comes with regional statistics. The regional outcome is rather interesting and not what i would expect. For example its interesting westernmost Litroal and easternmost Prekmurje have more R1b than rest of the center. I would expect it would gradually decline (or rise) from west to east. So you see Štajerc you may try to be associated with all the churkas you like but Upper Carniolans are your true brothers.

    #432417

    Anonymous

    Hm, so genetically our closest relatives are Western Slavs, Slovaks the most. I thought we would be much closer to NW Croats.

    Quote:
    I really like it comes with regional statistics. The regional outcome is rather interesting and not what i would expect. For example its interesting westernmost Litroal and easternmost Prekmurje have more R1b than rest of the center. I would expect it would gradually decline (or rise) from west to east. So you see Štajerc you may try to be associated with all the churkas you like but Upper Carniolans are your true brothers. :P

    I guess that's because they didn't mix with Italians, Germans or Hungarians? Jebemti čurke ;D but aren't our closest the folks from Prekmurje? I mean, you Upper Carlos have a pretty big genetic diversity, god knows what all, while we seem to have less of all that.

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