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  • #345892

    Anonymous

    Since all or most of the other Slavs praise their dishes, cuisine, food and all that, I'm curious about how much people actually like and know Slovene food.

    With Slovene food I mean real, authentic Slovene dishes and also food, that doesn't really originate from Slovenia, but is very common among Slovenes, so that they've taken it for theirs.

    In this thread you can also put questions about Slovene cuisine, recipes, in general – everything connected with it.

    Yugoslavia left a strong legacy with čevapčiči, burek and all that, but please, don't sell me those for Slovene or even better, try to avoid them them here. :)

    To get an idea what I am writing about here, let's say all this and much much more:

    image
    Goveja juha z rezanci (beef soup)

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    Gobova juha (mushroom soup)

    [img width=700 height=421]http://www.delo.si/assets/media/picture/20110123/pon.jpg?rev=1″/>
    Ajdovi žganci

    [img width=700 height=464]http://www.slovenian-alps.com/si/imagelib/magnify/default/_kaj-videti/_kulinarika/Kranjska_klobasa-1.jpg”/>
    Kranjska klobasa (Kranjska sausage)

    image
    Pogača

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    Prekmurski bograč

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    Pohorski lonec

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    Žlikrofi

    image
    Štajerska kisla juha (Styrian sour soup)

    image
    Potica

    [img width=700 height=465]http://www.pekarna-pecjak.si/sites/pecjak/files/struklji,%20orehovi.png”/>
    Štruklji

    image
    Štravbe/Flancate

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    Buhtlji

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    Kraški pršut

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    Savinjski želodec

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    Bujta repa

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    Jota (s kislim zeljem)

    image
    Ričet

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    Poljšja obara

    Ofc. there's a lot more, I can't think of all. If you know any more, please, post them!

    #422770

    Anonymous

    Štravbe/Flancate are the same as Polish faworki?

    #422771

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Štravbe/Flancate are the same as Polish faworki?

    Hmm, I wouldn't know as I've never heard of farowki before, sorry. :-

    #422772

    Anonymous

    http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faworki

    Here. It is written in Polish, there is no English translation. But if you understand Spanish, Catalon, German or Esperanto you can also visit their Wikipedia ;)

    These looks similar.

    #422773

    Anonymous

    Omg Štajerc so many foods missing honestly! :P Where are Slovene breads rlly, like koroški rženi kruh, vrtanek, cmoki, etc, etc. But still thanks for time and effort. Good work nevertheless. :D

    #422774

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faworki

    Here. It is written in Polish, there is no English translation. But if you understand Spanish, Catalon, German or Esperanto you can also visit their Wikipedia ;)

    These looks similar.

    Luckily, I understand German very well. :)

    Well, they seem to be similar, also Štravbi are eaten mostly for Carnival (Fašnk/Pust), but I think the dough is different. I must look up the recipe for Štravbi, I can't tell you this very moment …

    Quote:
    Omg Štajerc so many foods missing honestly! :P Where are Slovene breads rlly, like koroški rženi kruh, vrtanek, cmoki, etc, etc. But still thanks for time and effort. Good work nevertheless. :D

    You know:

    Ofc. there's a lot more, I can't think of all. :) If you know any more, please, post them! :D

    But thank you nevertheless! :D

    #422775

    Anonymous

    mice and bears? sure  ;D

    well its mostly common central european cuisine. except for povhi and bears

    #422776

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    mice and bears? sure  ;D

    well its mostly common central european cuisine. except for povhi and bears

    Oh, you and your polhi and bears! ::) :) Polhi are eaten mostly only in Carniola once or twice a year by a few people who go hunt them, some people don't even know that they can be eaten. And you come across bear flesh even rarer. Like you guys don't have any weird dishes?

    Otherwise I asure you – Slovene cuisine is great. :D

    #422777

    Anonymous

    So far, everyone either adores it, or has never tried it :D

    I've tried some similar to Slovenian, but that's about it.  Looks good!

    #422778

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    So far, everyone either adores it, or has never tried it :D

    I've tried some similar to Slovenian, but that's about it.  Looks good!

    Hehe, so far so good. :) Could you tell us what that "similar to Slovenian" is?

    #422779

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Hehe, so far so good. :) Could you tell us what that "similar to Slovenian" is?

    Sure :)  I can't tell how similar of course (or maybe the exact same thing, idk), but I've eaten and baked a Czech and Croatian version of potica, but I'm not sure the names…I've seen it called povitica a lot. 

    Some of those stews look familiar but I have no idea about names.  I haven't had štruklji but my boyfriend doesn't cease to enjoy torturing me with pictures of what his grandma makes :(  And I might sell him to you for that kraški pršut lol if it's anywhere near as good as others I've had.

    I made either…maybe a Czech or Polish version of štravbe/flancate, I found a recipe on some site with a bunch of different slavic recipes.  They were great, though mine were not nearly that pretty.

    #422780

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Sure :)  I can't tell how similar of course (or maybe the exact same thing, idk), but I've eaten and baked a Czech and Croatian version of potica, but I'm not sure the names…I've seen it called povitica a lot. 

    Some of those stews look familiar but I have no idea about names.  I haven't had štruklji but my boyfriend doesn't cease to enjoy torturing me with pictures of what his grandma makes :(  And I might sell him to you for that kraški pršut lol if it's anywhere near as good as others I've had.

    I made either…maybe a Czech or Polish version of štravbe/flancate, I found a recipe on some site with a bunch of different slavic recipes.  They were great, though mine were not nearly that pretty.

    If you've eaten that pther Slavic stuff that looks like potica, it's almost the same, yes. And potica comes from povitica – it got shortened during the centuries as potica is very very old.

    I can't guarantee how similar štravbe are to what you ate as I haven't eaten anything different … :- They look very similar, so I gues they must also taste similar. :)

    Štruklji are great as you can eat them sweet as a dessert or as a side dish to meat with some gravy or so. There are also many ways to make them, with different fillings.

    I asume you've eaten mostly Italian or Spanish prosciutto? Well, kraški pršut is a bit different in taste. I prefer kraški to the Italian ones … It definetly is quite different than those German Schwarzwälder hams, if you know what I mean.

    If you ever find yourselve in Cleveland, perhaps take a drive to the Slovenian National Home (Narodni dom). I'm sure the folks there will be very glad to tell you a thing or two. There're also a few shops that sells Slovene stuff. At least kranjska klobasa is available in the States. And vodka Slovenia. ;D

    #422781

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    If you've eaten that pther Slavic stuff that looks like potica, it's almost the same, yes. And potica comes from povitica – it got shortened during the centuries as potica is very very old.

    I can't guarantee how similar štravbe are to what you ate as I haven't eaten anything different … :- They look very similar, so I gues they must also taste similar. :)

    Štruklji are great as you can eat them sweet as a dessert or as a side dish to meat with some gravy or so. There are also many ways to make them, with different fillings.

    I asume you've eaten mostly Italian or Spanish prosciutto? Well, kraški pršut is a bit different in taste. I prefer kraški to the Italian ones … It definetly is quite different than those German Schwarzwälder hams, if you know what I mean.

    If you ever find yourselve in Cleveland, perhaps take a drive to the Slovenian National Home (Narodni dom). I'm sure the folks there will be very glad to tell you a thing or two. There're also a few shops that sells Slovene stuff. At least kranjska klobasa is available in the States. And vodka Slovenia. ;D

    Yes, I've mostly had Italian ones.  I'm sure that one is great, though.  I had some American version, but it was kind of moist and rubbery.  I did not approve.

    Thanks for the name clarification, I've wondered about that for ages!

    #422782

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Yes, I've mostly had Italian ones.  I'm sure that one is great, though.  I had some American version, but it was kind of moist and rubbery.  I did not approve.

    Thanks for the name clarification, I've wondered about that for ages!

    You're most welcome. :)

    #422783

    Anonymous

    Kranjska kobasica. <3

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