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  • #343448

    Anonymous

    [table]
    [tr]
    [td][img height=230]http://desmond.imageshack.us/Himg134/scaled.php?server=134&filename=dodole.jpg&res=landing” />
    Dodole[/td]
    [td][img height=230]http://www.vesti-online.com/data/images/2010-04-03/49662_bele-poklade–lozovik_f.jpg?ver=1270309057″ />
    Poklade[/td]
    [td][img height=230]http://blog.serbia-photo.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/04/most.jpg” />
    Lazarice[/td]
    [/tr]
    [/table]

    [table]
    [tr]
    [td]DODOLE ( Serbian rain dance ) oldest Slavic tradition[/td]
    [td]    [/td]
    [td]Ej Dodole*, mili bože,
    Daj bože daj sitnu rosu

    Da narosi ovo polje

    Ej Dodole, mili bože,
    Daj bože daj sitnu rosu

    Na ovoj polje berićetno,

    Ej Dodole, mili bože
    Daj bože daj sitnu rosu… [/td]
    [td]    [/td]
    [td]Oh Dodole, our dear God.
    Give god, oh give us some dew

    So it will water our fields

    Oh Dodole, our dear god.
    Give god, oh give us some dew

    On this generous field

    Oh Dodole, our dear god.
    Give god, oh give us some dew… [/td]
    [/tr]

    [/table]

    * Dodola (also spelled Doda, Dudulya and Didilya, pronounced: doh-doh-la, doo-doo-lya, or dee-dee-lya), Perperuna or Preperuša is an old Slavic tradition. According to some interpretations, she is the Slavic goddess of rain,[1] and the wife of the supreme god Perun (who is the god of thunder). Slavs believed that when Dodola milks her heavenly cows, the clouds, it rains on earth. Each spring Dodola is said to fly over woods and fields, and spread vernal greenery, decorating the trees with blossoms.

    DODOLE
    "Dodole" songs are typical ritual songs used to perform during summer dry seasons. Young girls masked themselves with branches and leaves (as symbol of vegetation exuberance). They used to visit village houses and perform "dodole" ritual (singing "dodole" songs and dancing ritual dance). As respond to a ritual performance, the master of the house would come out from house and throw some water on dancers, which is ancient way of invoking the spirits of rain. "Dodole" ritual originates from pre-Christian times and represents the oldest Slavic tradition.

    POKLADE
    The months of January and February are the time of carnival throughout the country. Dancers appear wearing fantastic masks, sometimes more than six feet tall, decorated at the top with bird wings and feathers, heads of animals, as well as mirrors and colored streamers. Covered with sheep skins and armed with long clubs and wooden swords, they leap and jump to the deafening sound of drums and the cattle bells on their belts. In some areas the men blacken their faces and wear womens overdresses to perform these carnival dances that drive out evil winter demons and ensure health and good crops.

    In some ways the carnival custom of Serbia (Republika Srpska) is the most spectacular and colorful of all the ritual dance events. Performed mainly during the week before Lent, the festival in its entirety may last for a good part of February, beginning sometimes as early as January.

    Prevelj was a ritual-dance enacted around a fire for the peace of dead souls. A large bonfire was built and each family who had had a recent death, would carry a log to this fire in dedication to their dead relative. The women were not usually allowed to be present at this event, but sometimes one woman would steal toward the fire and touch it with her spindle as a symbolic gesture. The dancing around the fire would get under way as soon as the musicians had first played a somber piece to which there was no dancing. The villagers would stand around the fire holding on to each other by their waistbands, while the mourners who did not dance, held lighted candles. The kolovodja, or leader of the kolo, held a long rod or staff in his right hand, and as soon as the fire died down, would call out to the line of dancers to jump over the fire. Those who wouldnt jump might be admonished by means of his large staff. Today the custom of jumping over the fire is largely dying out, through dancing around bonfires is still popular.

    LAZARICE (derivative from Lada, Ladarice)
    The week before Easter, Serbians living near Sredska celebrate Lazarus Saturday. A group of six girls, one of whom masquerades as Lazar (Lazarus), and another as Lazarka (the female equivalent), go from house to house singing and dancing. The girl who is Lazar wears a mans white shirt and a mans hat decorated with flowers. In his hands he carries a staff or sometimes an umbrella. The Lazarka wears a necklace of golden coins, and on her head, money, greens, and garlic to scare away evil spirits. The girls carry two baskets; in one they collect beans, in the other, eggs. After dancing in front of each house, they sing songs to bless the head of each house­hold.

    #385305

    Anonymous

    I dont see where did you heard mention of Dažbog? It is : "Daj Bože, daj sitnu rosu" "Give God give tiny drew".
    Here is text from Trkulja's site.
    http://www.balkanopolis.com/extra.html
    Besides it, spot which you posted does not show Dodole at all.
    Just to make clear, I do believe dodole is remanant of Pagan practices, I just pointed to wrong version of text and unedequate spot.

    #385306

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I dont see where did you heard mention of Dažbog? It is : "Daj Bože, daj sitnu rosu" "Give God give tiny drew".
    Here is text from Trkulja's site.
    http://www.balkanopolis.com/extra.html
    Besides it, spot which you posted does not show Dodole at all.

    It shows various pictures, including dodole and koleda. I interpret it as such, there are various folk songs mentioning pagan deities, Murena, Cojcole, Jarilo etc. this song may or may not describe it. I however see it as such, given a tribute to this forum.

    #385307

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    It shows various pictures, including dodole and koleda. I interpret it as such, there are various folk songs mentioning pagan deities, Murena, Cojcole, Jarilo etc. this song may or may not describe it. I however see it as such.

    It shows some things from Croatia and Bulgaria, some Serbian costumes, but no Dodole. Well you could differ Dajbože and Daj Bože, one word could not have two accents.

    #385308

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    It shows some things from Croatia and Bulgaria, some Serbian costumes, but no Dodole. Well you could differ Dajbože and Daj Bože, one word could not have two accents.

    Isn't 01:07, Dodole? I draw a relation to an old practice, and an old deity, in such also free to individual interpretation. I also believe that the Church would distance itself from such practice. I reckon worshipping God for personal benefit, is not in the spirit of Christianity.

    #385309

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Isn't 01:07, Dodole? I draw a relation to an old practice, and an old deity, in such also free to individual interpretation. I also believe that the Church would distance itself from such practice. I reckon worshipping God for personal benefit, is not in the spirit of Christianity.

    Well I was not speaking about it. I just said text goes: Daj Bože daj sitnu rosu, Just that.
    Concerning you question, let's not go in offtopic. If you are interested in it, I could answer you in some oter topic.

    #385310

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I dont see where did you heard mention of Dažbog? It is : "Daj Bože, daj sitnu rosu" "Give God give tiny drew".

    Fortunately the expression "Daj Boże" or "Daż Boże" was preserved among Western and Eastern Slavs and it derives from "Dażbog". Our Slavic language is older than ~1,000 years.

    #385311

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Fortunately the expression "Daj Boże" or "Daż Boże" was preserved among Western and Eastern Slavs and it derives from "Dażbog". Our Slavic language is older than ~1,000 years.

    Prelja, first, Slavic language is even older than that, but it is extinct.
    Second there is absolute difference between Daj Bože : Give God. and Dajbože. Daj is second person of imperative of ver dati "to give", Bože is vocative of noun Bog, o declension. Nice that you love our Slavic heritage, but let start respect it by getting known by grammatical rules of Slavic languages.

    #385312

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Prelja, first, Slavic language is even older than that, but it is extinct.
    Second there is absolute difference between Daj Bože : Give God. and Dajbože. Daj is second person of imperative of ver dati "to give", Bože is vocative of noun Bog, o declension. Nice that you love our Slavic heritage, but let start respect it by getting known by grammatical rules of Slavic languages.

    It is a song, when sung, a word can have more accentuations then when spoken.

    #385313

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    It is a song, when sung, a word can have more accentuations then when spoken.

    Cvetinov, singing or telling, in Serbian there is just one accent in one word. That was your interpretation, but from scientific point, (I am absolutley neutral here), there is no reason to identify Dajbog in this text. You could allways experiment while singing "Dajbože, daj" and "Daj Bože daj"

    #385314

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Cvetinov, singing or telling, in Serbian there is just one accent in one word. That was your interpretation, but from scientific point, (I am absolutley neutral here), there is no reason to identify Dajbog in this text. You could allways experiment while singing "Dajbože, daj" and "Daj Bože daj"

    You are right, they sing about Dodola, not Dažbog. It has been changed.

    #385315

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    You are right, they sing about Dodola, not Dažbog. It has been changed.

    Yes, it is one of interpretations.

    #385316

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Prelja, first, Slavic language is even older than that, but it is extinct.

    Trolibor, firstly Slavic language is not extinct. This is blasphemy, especially if you say so on Slavic heritage preservation forum. Watch where you are  ;)

    Second there is absolute difference between Daj Bože : Give God. and Dajbože. Daj is second person of imperative of ver dati "to give", Bože is vocative of noun Bog, o declension. Nice that you love our Slavic heritage, but let start respect it by getting known by grammatical rules of Slavic languages.

    Secondly: in Polish there is no difference between Daj Boże or Dajboże if you listen to the pronunciation and I am not referring to the song at all. As to grammatical rules in this case there are the same in Polish. I respect our Slavic heritage and grammatical rules as well and also support it by examples. So what is your point beside trolling every tread related to Slavic tradition customs?  :D

    PS And I agree that the song is about Dodola not Dadżbog. My statement about connection between ‘Daj Boże’ and Dadżbog had a general nature.

    #385317

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Trolibor, firstly Slavic language is not extinct.

    I think he meant Proto-Slavic, which is extinct since non of us speak it. Our languages are so to say dialects of Proto-Slavic, evolved in the course of time, the original language doesn't exist (or never did as we imagine it), since it never had a standardised form.

    For example Serbian and Croatian evolved from the same Polabian Slavic dialect as Czech, Slovak and Polish. The Polabian Slavic dialect evolved supposedly from Proto-Slavic.

    #385318

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I think he meant Proto-Slavic, which is extinct since non of us speak it. Our languages are so to say dialects of proto-Slavic, evolved in the course of time, the original language doesn't exist (or never did as we imagine it), since it never had a standardised form.

    Maybe, but he didn't mention it. Fortunately it was divided and each Slavic nation preserved elements from our pre-christian tradition and now we can compare it. Language is our relict and treasure no matter what the other say or think  :)

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