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  • #385319

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    firstly Slavic language is not extinct. This is blasphemy, especially if you say so on Slavic heritage preservation forum. Watch where you are  ;)

    There are Slavic languages ther is no Slavic language.

    Quote:
    Secondly: in Polish there is no difference between Daj Boże or Dajboże if you listen to the pronunciation and I am not referring to the song at all. As to grammatical rules in this case there are the same in Polish. I respect our Slavic heritage and grammatical rules as well and also support it by examples. So what is your point beside trolling every tread related to Slavic tradition customs? 

    Well first show me where am I trolling. Because I said something aginst your ilusions. Slavic traditions would not die out if your misunderstandings stop.

    Quote:
    PS And I agree that the song is about Dodola not Dadżbog. My statement about connection between ‘Daj Boże’ and Dadżbog had a general nature.

    And you proved it by showing us what? That dati is derived from Dažbog?
    And please refrain from personal insults, I did not insulted you. I even like you, but if you want to discuss do it seriously. Before this evening you did not even know what the heck dodole are, now you are ready to read lectures to me who saw it numerous times, who learned about it in school. To me it is part of my, Serbian, Slavic heritage, to you it is cool thing you read in forum and now you are ready to teach all world about it.
    Again, if you want to be taken seriously try to act like it. Nothin personaly. 

    #385320

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Prelja, first, Slavic language is even older than that, but it is extinct.
    Second there is absolute difference between Daj Bože : Give God. and Dajbože. Daj is second person of imperative of ver dati "to give", Bože is vocative of noun Bog, o declension. Nice that you love our Slavic heritage, but let start respect it by getting known by grammatical rules of Slavic languages.

    I am not an expert on grammar of Slavic languages and no disrespect to any culture, my first impression would be that  Daj Bože and Dajbože are the same thing.  :)

    #385321

    Anonymous

    I am fascinated reading Dalibor, Prelja and Cvetinov when you are discussing Slavic cultures and customs.  :) I don’t see anyone is trolling here.  :)

    #385322

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I am not an expert on grammar of Slavic languages and no disrespect to any culture, my first impression would be that  Daj Bože and Dajbože are the same thing.  :)

    Kudesnik, you dont need to be an expert you need simply to know Serbian and to see differnece.

    Well to our slavic culturolog, Prelja, there are dododle about Perun (surely it could not be about hypotesed Dodola and about Dažbog).  8)

    #385323

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I am not an expert on grammar of Slavic languages and no disrespect to any culture, my first impression would be that  Daj Bože and Dajbože are the same thing.  :)

    But they ain't :) the one is a construct of two different words, the other carries a denotation.

    #385324

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Well to our slavic culturolog, Prelja, there are dododle about Perun (surely it could not be about hypotesed Dodola and about Dažbog).  8)

    You won’t find another kinky Polish girl who is interested in our culture.  :)You may give a little bit credit even if she makes a mistake … :)

    #385325

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Well to our slavic culturolog, Prelja, there are dododle about Perun (surely it could not be about hypotesed Dodola and about Dažbog).  8)

    Everything is intepreted or hypotesed, Dalibor. Only historical documents are certain, and they as well are interpreted observations of the people that wrote them.

    Dodola is believed to be, what it is believed to be, upon oral tradition and folklore, which are observed, interpreted and written down. Was Dodola or Perperuna a Slavic goddess of rain, we have no historical proof, but we have oral tradition that make it plausible, that she was.

    #385326

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Everything is intepreted or hypotesed, Dalibor. Only historical documents are certain, and they as well are interpreted observations of the people that wrote them.

    Dodola is believed to be, what it is believed to be, upon oral tradition and folklore, which are observed, interpreted and written down. Was Dodola or Perperuna a Slavic goddess of rain, we have no historical proof, but we have oral tradition that make it plausible, that she was.

    Cvetinov, well there are sources for lot of things such is this:

    „Да зароси ситна роса
    ој дудула мили Боже!
    Ој Илија дај Боже дај!
    Ој Илија мој Перуне!
    Дај Боже дај, дај Илија дај“

    #385327

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    There are Slavic languages ther is no Slavic language.
    Well first show me where am I trolling. Because I said something aginst your ilusions. Slavic traditions would not die out if your misunderstandings stop.
    And you proved it by showing us what? That dati is derived from Dažbog?
    And please refrain from personal insults, I did not insulted you. I even like you, but if you want to discuss do it seriously. Before this evening you did not even know what the heck dodole are, now you are ready to read lectures to me who saw it numerous times, who learned about it in school. To me it is part of my, Serbian, Slavic heritage, to you it is cool thing you read in forum and now you are ready to teach all world about it.
    Again, if you want to be taken seriously try to act like it. Nothin personaly.

    I don't need to prove you anything. Your statements and post speak for themselves. And who the heck you are to tell me that I know nothing about Dodola tradition? You fabricate it by yourself or something? And please, you don't need to like me, this is not mutual emotion to share here.

    #385328

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Cvetinov, well there are sources for lot of things such is this:

    Which can be interpreted as a prayer towards Rain (Dodola) as well as Thunder (Perun). Or do you have another interpretation what Dodola (and its variations) could mean?

    #385329

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I don't need to prove you anything.

    Then stop jumping in in each thread in which I wrote something.

    Quote:
    And who the heck you are to tell me that I know nothing about Dodola tradition?

    Because this if first time you ever read about it. Otherwise, you would bring some new informations in this thread and stoped insulting me.

    #385330

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Which can be interpreted as a prayer towards Rain (Dodola) as well as Thunder (Perun). Or do you have another interpretation what Dodola (and its variations) could mean?

    This is my interpretation as well reinforced by the chant ‘Daj Boże’ what is direct addressing to Dadżbog :)

    #385331

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Which can be interpreted as a prayer towards Rain (Dodola) as well as Thunder (Perun). Or do you have another interpretation what Dodola (and its variations) could mean?

    Well, Serbian ethnographers are usualy trying to asociate it with some of Peruns atributes. And song I posted is dedicated to Perun identified with St. Eliajs (as you could read). In English Wikipedia they posted jus one opinion of some American ethnographer (well he could be Serb judging by surname), but nevertheless it is from 1919.
    Why didn't you try to translate article from our Wikipedia, it has much more informations. Also look at references about Dodolas look in article about Perun.
    That is what we learned in schools on music classes and classes of Serbian literature.

    #385332

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Well, Serbian ethnographers are usualy trying to asociate it with some of Peruns atributes. And song I posted is dedicated to Perun identified with St. Eliajs (as you could read). In English Wikipedia they posted jus one opinion of some American ethnographer (well he could be Serb judging by surname), but nevertheless it is from 1919.
    Why didn't you try to translate article from our Wikipedia, it has much more informations. Also look at references about Dodolas look in article about Perun.
    That is what we learned in schools on music classes and classes of Serbian literature.

    Didn't find an article in our Wikipedia. Please post information, what I know is what I took from there.

    #385333

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Then stop jumping in in each thread in which I wrote something.

    Really? You are jumping on my posts and ignore me. if you please. I would be appreciated.

    Because this if first time you ever read about it. Otherwise, you would bring some new informations in this thread and stoped insulting me.

    http://bialczynski.wordpress.com/2012/04/09/odolan-i-cerber-trujace-drzewo-czyli-o-odmianie-doli-u-slowian-hindusow-i-scytow/

    All Slavic customs are pretty known in Poland thanks to one guy who runs this site. The information about Dodola is in the middle of the page. I don't care you don't now Polish.

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