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  • #347354

    Anonymous

    Belarus is planning to build one that will run from EU border , probably near Brest , through Minsk and high-tech park towards Smolensk – border city of Russia and eastern Belarus. The builder maybe a Chinese company CRCC that builds high speed railways around the world.

    The CRCC has the technology and experience of building high-speed railways with train speeds of 350kmph.
    http://www.railwaypro.com/wp/chinese-crcc-build-belarus-high-speed-rail-line/

    From Poland to Smolensk across Belarus in around 2 hours by high-speed train if at speed upto 350km /h with a stop in Minsk? That’d be cool! :) If Poland could build a high speed railway from east to west, and further Germany to Berlin. There maybe a lot of tourists visiting by train from Russia, Belarus, Poland. Currently,  Poland is involved in Rail Baltic project – Warsaw-Kaunas-Riga-Tallinn-Helsinki via ferry. It won’t be a fast railway. I doubt economic feasability of the project. The railway is not even via Vilnius. It’s probably another political decision to link the remote corner of EU with the rest of EU via railway, as the project is financed by EU.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rail_Baltica

    #439259

    Anonymous

    I’ve heard that before the war trains were faster than nowadays.

    #439268

    Anonymous

    There is a contract about speed railway of some sort from Belgrade to Budapest, but I don’t know what phase is that in or any specific details other than it’s supposed to be built by Chinese and Russian companies.

    @GaiusCoriolanus There was an article few years ago saying that Serbian trains have the same average speed as in time of knez Milan (later king) in 1881. Nothing much changed in last few years. Like there is around 130km train ride from my home town to the city I study in, going to the city ride takes around 2h, going back 3h.

    #439272

    Anonymous

    We don’t have high-speed railways here in Slovakia, but Slavs always find ways to achieve everything.
    So here’s a tutorial:
    1. Buy 3 bottles of pálenka (5 if you’re a Slav)
    2. Drink all of them right away, when you hop on the train
    3. Get sober on arrival

    You won’t remember the journey, but you’ll experience the same effect as if you took the high-speed train. The trip will be quick and you’ll feel dizzy just like from high speed. ;)

    #439336

    Anonymous

    >Buy 3 bottles of pálenka (5 if you’re a Slav)
    >Drink all of them right away, when you hop on the train

    Might as well buy 100, because at this point it won’t matter much. Go for the record.

    #439340

    Anonymous

    @”Kapitán Denis”

    > Buy 3 bottles of pálenka (5 if you’re a Slav)

    That’s what Russians what do when they get on the train. Travelling in Russia by train can get anything from several hours to a couple of weeks if you travel to Vladivostok from Moscow. You get train compartments with either 4 beds or 2 beds which are more expensive . Four beds compartments look like this : https://images.travexpress.net/trains/184/2lg.jpg

    To make the trips shorter people drink and tell stories. If tavellers run out of booze, a conductor that checks tickets, gives bed linen and prepares tea also sells cheap vodka making some money in addition to her small salary.

    We travelled from Moscow to Bishkek by train once. If memory serves me correctly it took us around 72 hours to get there. We had so much gear with us, so train was a cheaper option.

    #439341

    Anonymous

    @Sviatogor Russians apparently use this technique of teleportation as well. :) That proves that I’m not talking bulls**t. :D

    #439342

    Anonymous

    I made a mistake . The duration of the trip between Moscow and Vladivostok by train is 6 days, 23 hours. :)

    The cost of one bed ticket in 4 bed compartment is 435 Euros
    One bed in 2 bed compartment is 975 Euros

    Tickets in 2 bed compartments are expensive. As much as air-fare.

    #439344

    Anonymous

    The Balkans needs fast trains badly.

    I think Vardar MKD were the first to buy Chinese fast trains in Europe.  However, I don’t think they let the trains leave their country yet, its only domestic travel, perhaps the line hasn’t been upgraded yet outside the country.

    A fast train via Salonika into Skopje then Belgrade into Budapest was in plan and is good idea.  

    Likewise Salonika into Sofia then Bucharest should be another option.

    On a slightly different note, I think they were thinking of developing major shipping canals from Salonika into the Balkans to carry cargo, but not sure if they determined it feasible.

    http://macedoniaonline.eu/content/view/27702/2/

    http://www.balkaninsight.com/en/article/macedonia-warms-to-high-speed-railroad-plan

    http://www.igwpower.com/media/63132/Macedonia_CRRC.jpg?width=587&height=264&crop=true

    #439345

    Anonymous

    @GLK Channel Danube-Morava-Vardar-Solun? That’s an old idea (1904), there were numerous studies proving it would be economically successful, but it was never done. Few years ago our politicians started discussing it again, but I doubt It will ever happen.
    this is how it’s supposed to look like kanalDMVEM 

    #439347

    Anonymous

    There’s a train travelling from Minsk to Varna (Bulgaria) in summer seasons. It travels through Lviv, Ivano-Frankivsk, Bucharest to Varna. It’s a nice trip south through western Ukraine, Romania and Carpathians. :)

    Russia and Poland have fast railways with trains travelling upto 250km/h. In Russia the route is between Moscow and St-Petersburg. In Poland – Warsaw – Krakow and Warsaw – Gdansk.

    Chinese build railway for trains travelling at 350km/h and 400 km/h. Shangai Moglev line operates at 430km/h.

    I also wish I could travel via trans Siberian railway – the longest railway in the world. It’s popular among tourists. There are many videos of trips on trans Siberian railway on youtube.

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