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  • #347484
    Boris V.
    Boris V.
    Participant
    @dedushka

    In what way is the education in your country different now compared to before Iron Curtain was lifted. Is it better?

    #444725

    Anonymous

    Hey, if anyone here is willing to take LSAT then you would surely find Practice LSAT Questions quite useful for your test preparations. These previous questions are helpful for you to have an idea about the actual examination pattern.

    #444728

    Anonymous

    Belarus kept education of USSR for the most part till recently. During my days obtaining a basic science education degree would take 5 years with over 8,000 of contacts hours. In USA, Canada, Australia, UK our degrees often would be recognised as Master’s . If you can prove the number of hour you have studied describing topics and numbers for each subject.

    #444729

    Anonymous

    As my uncle would say, everything was better. :D

    #444730

    Anonymous

    @”Kapitán Denis”

    Eastern Belarusians go to study in western Russian universities and Moscow. Western Belarusians go to study in eastern Polish Universities and Warsaw. They say obtaining degrees in neighbouring countries is so easy, except leading universities in Moscow and Warsaw.  Just pay money. That’s what they say.  :)

    #444731

    Anonymous

    @balkanizer

    In what way is the education in your country different now compared to before Iron Curtain was lifted. Is it better?

    During my elementary and high school education we had communistic system. I don’t know how much it changed today, but I just know it did. When I got to university it switched for Bologne convention system. I guess you can say it was harder before because you had to learn more of those subjects that you wouldn’t need for the type of education you are trying to get and there were better fundings for university (because Yugoslavia invested more in science and education) so labs were up to date. On other side you could study for as long as you want back then and the education was free, but today maximum period of studying allowed is twice longer than the whole program, in other words if bachelor program lasts 4 years you must finish it in 8 years or you wasted your time. Also if you don’t get certain amount of points today you can become self-financing student, which in my opinion is not worth the money.

    PS. To be pricisely accurate its not 100% Bologna system, its more like some hybrid between Bologna and old system

    #444735

    Anonymous

    Basically it depends on the professors. If they’re old school, the program will be old school :D I had a mechanics professor who hates Bologna, often stresses that Bologna system isn’t implemented in Bologna University and claims that the best system is Russo-German. I never knew what that means. All the problems we solved were from Soviet/Russian books, he would sometimes bring them untranslated and make people read it out loud and translate :) Btw he doesn’t speak Russian, he only knows what he learned from those books, doesn’t know pronunciation, only the meaning. 

    #444837

    Anonymous

    @Dušan

    Sounds like me. Except, I cant really use Soviet style problem books in America. I would get accused od educational harrassment.

    Seriously, precollege science education in US is the funniest joke ever. Kids get to college, god forbid they get challenged a tad bit. They start crying and complaining, you lose your job. (I am not exaggerating. They literally start crying.)

    Was “Irodov” the problem book your professor used? That book is legendary. Epic problems.

    #444838

    Anonymous

    @balkanizer
    I think both you and your students are right. Successful problem solving is a matter of practice. With an amount of hours per subjects and pre-university knowledge students possess you would probably need more time to teach them how to solve harder problems, but that doesn’t mean they shouldn’t know how to solve them. I can tell you the problems we had weren’t easy. Most of exam problem were from some competition. Also on virtually every theoretical subject I had theoretical part was separated from problem solving part, plus sometimes you would have preliminary qualification quiz(usually 10 question and you had to know at least 6 to pass) which if you failed – hasta la vista until the next exam, meaning that professors wouldn’t even look the theoretical and problem solving parts you did even if they were good enough to pass. On other subjects you needed to have enough point before the final exam and if you don’t you can only try that subject next year by repeating everything from scratch. In any case I think all that was too much.

    #444851

    Anonymous

    @balkanizer only Russian name I remember from it is Kolesnikov.

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