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  • #346191

    Anonymous

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    How does everyone here feel about the European Union (EU) Freedom of Worker Movement provision in the EU treaties? Do you think it's a benefit or a disaster? Will this provision strengthen the economies of Europe or eventually destroy them?

    Is this provision even fair to force on member states?

    The provision is fairly liberal in my view:

    More on the provision here

    Free Movement – EU nationals

    Free movement of workers is a fundamental principle of the Treaty enshrined in Article 45 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and developed by EU secondary legislation and the Case law of the Court of Justice. EU citizens are entitled to:

        look for a job in another EU country 
        work there without needing a work permit
        reside there for that purpose
        stay there even after employment has finished
        enjoy equal treatment with nationals in access to employment, working conditions and all other social and tax advantages

    EU nationals may also have certain types of health & social security coverage transferred to the country in which they go to seek work (see coordination of social security systems).

    Free movement of workers also applies, in general terms, to the countries in the European Economic Area: Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway.

    People working in some occupations may also be able to have their professional qualifications recognised abroad (see mutual recognition of professional qualifications).

    EU social security coordination provides rules to protect the rights of people moving within the EU, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland.

    Recent editorial I came across:

    Bulgarians and Romanians: Workers or moochers?
    Bulgaria and Romania joined the European Union in 2007, but their citizens haven’t been allowed to work in most EU countries until now.
    By The Week Staff | January 8, 2014

    Have we been trampled yet? asked Aled Blake in the Western Mail (U.K.). The “extremists and the xenophobes” have been shrieking that a horde of jobless Bulgarians and Romanians would descend on the U.K. and other European Union countries on the first of the year. The two countries joined the union in 2007, but their citizens haven’t been allowed to work in most EU countries until now. Here in Britain, the right-wingers are full of questions for the new arrivals. “Are they going to steal the jobs of Britain’s hardworking families? Are they going to impose their cultural identity on our already broken communities?” We know they aren’t coming to claim the dole, because the government already imposed new restrictions on these arrivals. In reality, “they are looking to do none of these things.” They just want to work.

    Then let’s make sure they know how, said Patrick O’Flynn in the Express (U.K.). I’m not against all immigration—just that of the lazy or unemployable. Britain should simply be choosy. “Top scientists and entrepreneurs could be made extremely welcome, while unskilled folk with large families and a record of dependency could be politely refused.” Those with merely “bog-standard” skills should be told “to do plenty of work on yourselves before you even merit consideration.”

    But making such distinctions is against EU law, said Henryk M. Broder in Die Welt (Germany). EU countries have to let all job seekers from member states in, and the ones who will come will be poor and unskilled. “Just as water runs downhill and warm air rises, so do migrants flow from poor countries to rich.” Wealthy, educated people don’t relocate—unless you count tax dodgers like Gérard Depardieu. Unfortunately, we have no idea how many Bulgarians and Romanians are coming, how many are already here, and how many are on benefits. If statistics exist, they are being “concealed or obfuscated.” What we do know, though, is that German cities such as Duisburg and Mannheim are already “packed with such economic migrants,” and many more of our cities are “overrun with East European beggars,” many clutching infants. Yet our government expects us to cheer the arrival of these people simply because freedom of movement is a human right.

    True freedom of movement “is only possible between countries of similar income levels,” said Dainius Paukste in Delfi (Lithuania). When poor countries join the EU’s free migration zone, it “triggers mass immigration” that is in no state’s interests. Even Bulgaria may end up a loser, said Borislav Zyumbyulev in 24 Chasa (Bulgaria). We can expect an exodus of doctors and nurses, who can earn “20 times more pay” in the U.K., France, or Germany than they can in Bulgaria. To ward off disaster, we’ll have to raise doctors’ pay. So for us, the first consequence of open borders will be “higher health-care costs here at home.”

    Full editorials cited in above article can be found here:

    Aled Blake: It's time to welcome our new friends from the east to Britain

    Patrick O'Flynn: Migration could be so good for the country if it were controlled

    Henryk M. Broder: Starkes-Deutschland-germanisiert-Europa

    Dainius Paukste: Artėja metas, kai ES bus priversta tikslinti vieną iš savo fundamentalių laisvių

    Borislav Zyumbyulev: Да не мислим британците, ние какво ще правим?

    #425939

    Anonymous

    nobody likes to have his movement restricted.

    #425940

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    nobody likes to have his movement restricted.

    It's not the movement here that concerns the west European governments as mucha as it is the mooching of deadbeats off their social system.The Swiss canceled the social support for non-Swiss the other day,as they were sick of EU people leeching their social support money.

    #425941

    Anonymous

    whether or not non-citizens may receive certain payments is largely an internal thing.

    #425942

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    whether or not non-citizens may receive certain payments is largely an internal thing.

    Yes,but the more socialism-bent  countries have a tradition of social security support,and I guess they didn't count with influx of moochers into their countries when they made their laws,and if they want to change that now they will probably be called out as hypocritical,and there might be some media fuss over the fates of the newcommers.

    #425943

    Anonymous

    they can change their laws, and they do.

    #425944

    Anonymous

    The Brits pissed and moaned about Polish immigrants a few years ago, and most have added to the economy.  They work hard and open businesses.  Guess it all depends on what people are moving across the EU.  No one wants leeches and social leeches, that can be dealt with by each EU state.  I would think that immigrants from inside Europe would be better than importing Turks and Moors that want to remake European culture. 

    #425945

    Anonymous

    Well it does sound like the British "bla bla,all black,bla bla,bleak esimates,bla bla" lots of talk and in the end they'll see that those Bulgarians aren't half as bad as they thought they'll be.There was same kind of talk about the Poles some years back.

    #425946

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    The Brits pissed and moaned about Polish immigrants a few years ago, and most have added to the economy.  They work hard and open businesses.  Guess it all depends on what people are moving across the EU.  No one wants leeches and social leeches, that can be dealt with by each EU state.  I would think that immigrants from inside Europe would be better than importing Turks and Moors that want to remake European culture. 

    Yeah, it's hard to understand British xenophobia towards Poles…considering Poles are hard-working, christian, European…but i guess their politicians use it as a deralier from bigger issues in their country

    #425947

    Anonymous

    So tired of the anti-Slavic attitude in the U.K.  There are so many false claims about Polish immigrants mooching off the system.  Poles have mostly ended up in fast-growing bits of the country. Many live in London. Corby is one of the few places in NIMBYish Britain that welcomes house-building. Tom Beattie, the council leader, wants its population to double by 2030. Southampton, another city with lots of immigrants from eastern Europe, has gone from being an ageing city with declining skills to a young one with great aspirations, says John Denham, one of the city’s MPs.

    Marco Cereste, the Tory leader of the council in Peterborough, another popular destination for migrants, says his magazine-distribution company was turning away business ten years ago for a lack of workers. Not any more. And Poles are moving beyond menial, letterbox-stuffing work. Britain got younger and better-educated Poles than Germany or America. Many are overqualified for their jobs, and ought to move into more appropriate ones as their English and social networks become stronger.

    Some are already doing so. In the West Midlands, Polish entrepreneurs at first set up restaurants and construction firms. But later migrants, many of them women, built design firms and marketing agencies. A couple run bakeries big enough to supply leading supermarkets. Websites that once simply provided information for new arrivals have become commercial ventures that charge for access and advertising. Ilona Korzeniowska, editor of the Polish Express, a London-based newspaper, suggests Bulgarians and Romanians may fill jobs no longer of interest to Poles.  (The Economist, 2014)  So, the only conclusion is that the fear is based on just not wanting any eastern Europeans now.  David Cameron’s hostile rhetoric about immigration has caused anger in Warsaw, prompting two of the country’s pre-eminent political figures to attack the British prime minister.  Lech Walesa, former president and Nobel Peace Prize laureate, and Jaroslaw Kaczynski, a former prime minister, both wrote to Mr Cameron after he said that failure to apply transitional movement controls to EU accession countries such as Poland in 2004 had been a “huge mistake” for the UK.  (Financial Times, 2014)  I would think that the U.K. would also see the upside to Poles sending money home.  This increases demand for all EU products and makes the U.K. an attractive vacation destination for Poles with family in the U.K. 
     

    Bibliography:
    Financial Times. (2014). Poland attacks cameron view on migrants – ft.com. [online] Retrieved from: http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/21f36df8-6c01-11e3-a216-00144feabdc0.html#axzz2qyKVrMXy [Accessed: 20 Jan 2014].

    The Economist. (2014). The polish paradox. [online] Retrieved from: http://www.economist.com/news/britain/21591588-britons-loathe-immigration-principle-quite-immigrants-practice-bulgarians [Accessed: 20 Jan 2014].

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