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  • #341974

    Anonymous

    [img width=700 height=580]http://img504.imageshack.us/img504/1081/700zc1.png” />

    For the starters, Wends. Today there probably is some or even a lot of Polish people of Wendish ancestry, as well as Germans and Danes with Wendish background since Germans and Danes assimilated much of them into their society. So basically Wendish culture is lost gone today, unfortunately. Probably the most well known aspects of their existence in Slavic world was temple Arkona.
    [img width=700 height=525]http://01varvara.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/vsevolod-ivanov-the-temple-of-sventovida-in-arkona-2006-e1273558899426.jpg” />
    [size=15pt]Wends:[/size]

    [img width=700 height=453]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/7f/Limes.saxoniae.wmt.png” />

    Wends (Old English: Winedas, Old Norse: Vindr, German: Wenden, Winden, Danish: Vendere, Swedish: Vender) is a historic name for West Slavs living near Germanic settlement areas. It does not refer to a homogeneous people, but to various peoples, tribes or groups depending on where and when it is used. Today, it is used either in historical contexts or as a catch-all term for Kashubians, Lusatian Sorbs, and their descendants, like the Texas Wends.

    In the Middle Ages Wends often referred to Western Slavs living within the Holy Roman Empire, though not always. Mieszko I, the first historical prince of Poland, also appeared as "Dagome, King of the Wends" (Old Norse: Vindakonungr). The name has also survived in Finnic languages (Finnish: Venäjä, Estonian: Vene, Karelian: Veneä) denoting Russia.

    People termed "Wends" in the course of history
    West Slavs in the 9th and 10th centuries

    Some sources claim that in the 13th century there were actual historic people called Wends or Vends living as far as northern Latvia (east of the Baltic Sea) around the city of Wenden. Henry of Livonia (Henricus de Lettis) in his 13th-century Latin chronicle described a tribe called the Vindi.

    It is believed that Germanic peoples originally applied the ethnonym to the ancient Veneti, and that after the migration period they transferred it to their new easterly neighbours, the Slavs (see Relation between Veneti and Slavs for further details).

    For the medieval Scandinavians, the term Wend (Vender) meant a Slav originating from the southern shore of the Baltic Sea (Vendland), the term was therefore used to refer to Polabian Slavs like Obotrites, Rugian Slavs, Veleti/Lutici and Pomeranian tribes.

    For people living in medieval Northern Holy Roman Empire and its precursors, especially for the Saxons, a Wend (Wende) was a Slav living west of the Oder River area, an area later entitled Germania Slavica, settled by the Polabian tribes (mentioned above) in the north and by others, such as the Sorbs and the Milceni, in the middle.

    The Germans in the south used the term Winde instead of Wende and applied it, just as the Germans in the north, to Slavs they had contact with, e.g. Polabian people from Bavaria Slavica or the Slovenes (the names Windic March and Windisch Feistritz still bear testimony to this historical denomination).

    Following the 8th century, the Frankish kings and their successors organized nearly all Wendish land into marches. This process later turned into the series of crusades. By the 12th century, all Wendish lands had become part of the Holy Roman Empire. In the course of the Ostsiedlung, which reached its peak in the 12th to 14th centuries, this land was settled by Germans and reorganized (in every sense). The term Wends now referred to Slavic-speaking minorities within the empire, whereas the Slavs east of the new border were not termed Wends, but Lechites; Misico, also appeared as Dagome King of Wends ON Vindakonungr etc.

    Due to the process of assimilation following German settlement, many Slavs adopted the German culture and language. Only some rural communities that did not have a strong admixture with Germans and continued to use West Slavic languages were still termed Wends. With the gradual decline of the use of these local Slavic tongues, the term Wends slowly disappeared, too.

    Today, only two groups of Wends still exist: the Lusatian Sorbs in present-day eastern Germany and the Pomeranian Kashubs in present-day northern Poland. As of 2010[update] they are referred to as Sorbs and Kashubs rather than Wends.

    Early sources

    In the third book of his Geographia, Ptolemy mentions the Ouenedai among other dwellers on the Baltic shore in the middle of the 2nd century CE. Some early scholars identified the Ouenedai with the Wends,[3] however, based on linguistic facts, modern academic views now argue that the Ouenedai were ethnolinguistically different from Slavs and hence cannot be equated with Wends.

    If you remember some old-Slavic tribes that are today forgotten or assimilated into bigger present-day ones, please do mention them here as they deserve to be so. Tribes and groups of Great Moravia would be interesting to mention here as well, as many today don't exist anymore. Anyway, let the list go on.

    #358767

    Anonymous

    [size=15pt]Narentines of Pagania[/size]

    [img width=512 height=700]http://th04.deviantart.net/fs10/PRE/i/2006/099/9/9/Croat_warrior_from_9__century_by_Sedeslav.jpg” />

    This was an early Slavic tribe that settled Dalmatia, Red Croatia.

    image

    They were know for their highly zealotous Slavic paganism, and they rejected Christianity fiercly. They usually raided Christian ships from present-day Italy, as they were Slavic pirates, warriors and raiders. Today their culture is assimilated into Croatian culture after their Christianization, so they practically as a separate tribe don't exist anymore thought a lot of present day Dalmatians has their ancestry. They were among the last Slavic people that accepted the Christianity on these territories. Were they of Croatian or Serbian origin it is unknown, most likely they where a separate Slavic tribe that settled on it's own during the migration periods thought today it's considered they were Croats, or at least today they are Croats, Dalmatians to be more specific.

    image

    Pagania (the Narentine Frontier), (Greek: (Ν)αρεντάνοι – (N)arentanoi, Croatian: Paganija, Krajinjane, Neretljani, Italian: Narentani, Narentini, Serbian: Паганија, Paganija; Неретљани, Neretljani), was a land settled by the Slav tribe known as the Narentines (Neretljani) in an area of southern Dalmatia (modern day Republic of Croatia), west of the river Neretva (Narenta). They were known for their piracy.

    Pagania bordered Kingdom of Croatia to the west and spread eastwards from the river of Cetina. It was consisted out of three lesser Principalities: Makar, Rastik (from Imotski to Ljubuški) and Dalen (which is not on the coast). It also included the islands of Mljet, Korčula, Brač and Hvar. The main Narentine cities were Vrulja (Gornja Brela), Mokro, Ostrog (near modern Zaostrog) and Lavćen (Gradac) or Slavineca; but by far the most important was the fortified Omiš in the later ages. At the east, Neretvia reached the river of Neretva, which faced Zachlumia.

    The Narentines (Neretljani) were named by their land, Neretvia, which was named by its neighbouring river. Their secondary name, Pagans (and thus their land Pagania), the Romano-Byzantines gave them because they weren't Christianized. The Latin name Merania, meaning the Coastland, was also used – and it gave the name for its inhabitants: Marians.

    The region has also be referred to as being part of Red Croatia, in the Chronicle of the Priest of Duklja written 1298-1300 by a Catholic monk.[6][7][8][9] They were also referred to as Neretljani Croatians.

    The Adriatic coastland that the Narentians (Neretljani) inhabited ranged 75 kilometers from the mouth of Neretva in the Adriatic Sea at the east to the river Cetina at the west. It was 10-20 kilometers wide. Most of the soil was composed out of forests and swamps, while there was very little arable land. Also, They possessed these islands: Brač, Hvar, Mljet, Korčula, Vis and Lastovo.

    The Pagans fiercely opposed Christianity, seeing it as a means of oppression, and cherished the Slavic Paganism for long.

    Next to sailing, the Marians were professed in trading, growing olives, figs and vineyards. On the outskirts of Biokovo and Mosor and on the islands, they herded cattle and they were also tilling the fields to an extent. In the later medieval ages, Merania imported wheat and exported wine, solted fish, dry fruits, etc.

    Their best expertise and the main income of the Pagans was piracy. The loot was split traditionally just as the catch of fish – one half goes to the provider of the ships and/or the organizer of the hunt (Prince or Archont) and the other half is split amongst the crewmembers. They were especially notorious for their slave-trade [11] The main type of vessel the Narentines used was the Slavic Sagena (Latin: "Sagitta", meaning: "arrow") from the beginning of the 9th century, a variation of the Scandinavian Viking Drakkar. It was a long, relatively shallow vessel that was specific for its high speed with a slender body, a sharp bow and a mast. It was manned by 40 crewmembers that were at the same time professional fighters. Other than this type of vessel, the Pagans used the Kondura; a ship similar to the Sagena, but a lot smaller, with a crew of 20 members. The Marians also used other types of vessels and barges.

    The Marian rulers were called Morstiks and Judges, although the Church refers to them as Kings. The titles of the nobility were typical Slavic titles: Prince, Treasure-keeper, Chaplain, Knight.

    #358768

    Anonymous

    I was going to add Polabians, but aren't they also considered as Wends? Then it would make no sense to put them in.

    #358769

    Anonymous

    Sagudati, Runhini, Dragoviti, Strumenci, Smolyani, Verzichi, Bayunichi, Velegeziti, Mlinzi, Ezeriti…
    image

    image

    #358770

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Sagudati, Runhini, Dragoviti, Strumenci, Smolyani, Verzichi, Bayunichi, Velegeziti, Mlinzi, Ezeriti…

    Never heard for half of these, could you write a thing or two?

    Quote:
    I was going to add Polabians, but aren't they also considered as Wends? Then it would make no sense to put them in.

    True, they cluster with Wends thought i think they were a separate tribe to Wends, only probably highly intermixed with Wends.

    #358771

    Anonymous
    Quote:

    Quote:
    Sagudati, Runhini, Dragoviti, Strumenci, Smolyani, Verzichi, Bayunichi, Velegeziti, Mlinzi, Ezeriti…

    Never heard for half of these, could you write a thing or two?

    Quote:
    I was going to add Polabians, but aren't they also considered as Wends? Then it would make no sense to put them in.

    True, they cluster with Wends thought i think they were a separate tribe to Wends, only probably highly intermixed with Wends.

    ezerites milings were the southest slavs in europe.they tried to occupy patras, they lost and later they were surrendered and assimilated.Vainuiti were more peaceful and easily assimilated.

    #358772

    Anonymous
    Quote:

    Quote:
    I was going to add Polabians, but aren't they also considered as Wends? Then it would make no sense to put them in.

    True, they cluster with Wends thought i think they were a separate tribe to Wends, only probably highly intermixed with Wends.

    I would say, that Polabian is geography based name, rather than ethnic based.

    #358773

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Never heard for half of these, could you write a thing or two?

    There isn't much informations about this tribes in historical sources, for most of them we know only that they existed.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Draguvites
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smolyani
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berziti
    http://mk.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%A1%D1%82%D1%80%D1%83%D0%BC%D1%98%D0%B0%D0%BD%D0%B8
    http://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%A0%D0%B8%D0%BD%D1%85%D0%B8%D0%BD%D1%8B

    Many of them recorded during the siege of Thessaloniki in 7th century.

    image

    image

    List of medieval Slavic tribes
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Medieval_Slavic_tribes

    #358774

    Anonymous

    [size=15pt]Kievan Rus[/size]

    image

    Kievan Rus, the Slavic tribe with Scandinavian Viking influence. One of the first East-Slavic states, later dismembered on Ukraine, Russia and Belarus due political reasons. All three countries link themselves to Kievan Rus and see the first Rus state as their origin state, thought Kievan Rus as unified tribe are culturally extinct today as there is no such tribe anymore.

    Kievan Rus' was a medieval polity in Eastern Europe, from the late 9th to the mid 13th century, when it disintegrated under the pressure of the Mongol invasion of 1237–1240.

    Contemporarily, the state was known as "land of the Rus'" (Old East Slavic рускаӕ землѧ, from the ethnonym Рѹ́сь, Greek Ῥώς, Arabic الروس ar-Rūs), in Greek as Ῥωσία, latinized Ruscia, Russia, later also Ruthenia.[1][2] The name "Kievan Rus'" (Russian: Ки́евская Русь Kievskaya Rus’) was coined much later in the 19th century in Russian historiography[3] to distinguish the early polity from successor states, which also called Rus in their title. Also in the 20th century, the Russian term was rendered in Belarusian and Ukrainian as Кіеўская Русь and Ки́ївська Русь Kyivs'ka Rus’, respectively.[4]

    The early phase of the state is sometimes known as the "Rus Khaganate", while the history of Rus' proper begins in 882, when the capital was moved from Novgorod to Kiev, after Varangians (Vikings), who were called Rus, conquered the city from the Khazars.[5] The state reaches its zenith in the mid 11th century, when it encompassed territories stretching south to the Black Sea, east to Volga, and west to the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania.[6] The reigns of Vladimir the Great (980–1015) and his son Yaroslav I the Wise (1019–1054) constitute the "Golden Age" of Kiev, which saw the acceptance of Christianity and the creation of the first East Slavic written legal code, the Russkaya Pravda ("Justice of Rus").

    Coinciding with the end the Viking age, the state declined beginning in the later 11th and during the 12th century, disintegrating into various rival regional powers. [7] It was further weakened by economic factors such as the collapse of Rus' commercial ties to Byzantium due to the decline of Constantinople[8] and the falling off of trade routes, and it finally fell to the Mongol invasion of the 1230s.

    After its disintegration, the various East Slavic principalities were united within the Russian Empire in the 18th century. The modern East Slavic states of Belarus, Ukraine and Russia all derive their identity from the early medieval state.

    #358775

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    [size=15pt]Kievan Rus[/size]

    image

    Kievan Rus, the Slavic tribe with Scandinavian Viking influence.

    The Viking influence was very small actually. The dukes of the Kievan Rus' were pure-blooded Slavs, descendants of the Sarmatians. The ancient Aryan capital of Kyiv, one of the cradles of slavdom, was also not founded by Varyags but by three Slavic (Proto-Ukrainian, eastern Polan) brothers – Kyi, Shchek and Khoriv and their sister Lybid.

    One of the first East-Slavic states, later dismembered on Ukraine, Russia and Belarus due political reasons. All three countries link themselves to Kievan Rus and see the first Rus state as their origin state, thought Kievan Rus as unified tribe are culturally extinct today as there is no such tribe anymore.

    Rus' was dominated by what we now know as Ukrainians. Belarussians and Rusyns also took  part in forming Kievan Rus'. Russians have nothing to do with ancient Rus', that's just propaganda of the Kremlin.

    After its disintegration, the various East Slavic principalities were united within the Russian Empire in the 18th century. The modern East Slavic states of Belarus, Ukraine and Russia all derive their identity from the early medieval state.

    God, this just smells of Muscovite propaganda. Self-respecting Belarussians and Ukrainians never accepted Moscow as authority and rebelled against the oppressors any time they could.

    #358776

    Anonymous

    The Drevlyans.

    The Drevlians (Деревляни, Derevliany in Ukrainian; Древляне, Drevlyane in Russian) were a tribe of Early East Slavs between the 6th and the 10th century, which inhabited the territories of Polesia, Right-bank Ukraine west of Polans, down the stream of the rivers Teteriv, Uzh, Ubort, and Stviga. On the West, Drevlians’ territories reached the Sluch River, where the Volynians (related to the territory of Volynia) and Buzhans (related to the name of Southern Bug river) lived. On the North, Drevlians’ neighbors were the Dregovichs.
    Igor of Kiev Exacting Tribute from the Drevlyans, by Klavdiy Lebedev (1852-1916).

    The name of the tribe derives from the Slavic word древо or дерево (drevo, or derevo), which means "tree", because the Drevlians used to live in thick woods.

    The Drevlians left many archaeological traces, such as agricultural settlements with semi-dugouts (or earth-houses), moundless burial grounds and barrows, fortified towns like Vruchiy (today's Ovruch), Gorodsk, site of an ancient settlement near Malyn (supposedly, a residence of the Drevlian prince Mal) and others. The principal city of the Drevlians was Iskorosten (today’s Korosten), where one can still see a group of compact ancient settlements. After they were conquered by the Kievan Rus', Iskorosten was burned to the ground and the capital was transferred to Ovruch.[1] By the end of the first millennium, the Drevlians already had well-developed farming and handicrafts.

    The Drevlians opposed fervently any attempts by outsiders to include them in Kievan Rus. According to a number of chronicles, in the times of Kyi, Schek and Khoriv (supposedly, founders of Kiev) the Drevlians had their own princely rule and were frequently at war with the Polans. In 883, Prince Oleg of Novgorod made the Drevlians pay tribute to Kiev. In 907, the Drevlians took part in the Kievan military campaign against the Byzantine Empire.
    Olga's revenge for the assassination of her husband.

    After Oleg’s death in 912, the Drevlians stopped paying tribute. The Varangian warlord Sveneld made them pay tribute to himself. Oleg's successor Igor attempted to levy the tribute after Sveneld, but the Drevlians revolted and killed him in 945. Igor’s widow Olga avenged her husband’s death in an extremely harsh manner, killing Drevlianian ambassadors and nobility, burning their capital of Iskorosten to the ground and leveling other towns. After having subjugated the Drevlians, Olga transformed their territories into a Kievan appanage with the center in Vruchiy.
    The slavs, 9th century.

    The last mention of the Drevlians was in a chronicle of 1136, when their lands were given as a gift to the Church of the Tithes by Yaropolk Vladimirovich.

    In the 19th century there were still people designated as Drevlyans. Almost 200,000 were counted in the 1861 census. However since then they have become totally merged into the greater Ukrainian population.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drevlyans

    #358777

    Anonymous

    Marvaks (Мърваци)-Extinct Bulgarian ethnographical group in present days Northern Greece. Marvaks are mentioned for the first time in 6th century A.D. in Byzantine sources as one of the Slavic tribes. Byzantine writers describe them as pirates who raid on merchant ships in the Eagean. In the Middle ages Marvaks were one of the slavic tribes which formed the Bulgarian nation. But through the Middle ages they kept their name and pirate habbits. During the Ottoman age Marvaks were forced to leave piracy because of the Ottoman fleet in the Eagean. During the Turkish rule some Marvaks were islamised but the majority was Orthodox Christian. Marvaks (both Christian and Moslems) kept their name till the beginning of the 20th century. They were one of the best educated Bulgarians, they were very active in the Bulgarian national liberation movement, and also in the struggle for independent Bulgarian church. But in the beginning of the 20th century the advancing greek army did something unforgivable. Marvaks refused to let greek forces in their villages, and wanted to join Bulgaria. So greeks began to fire against the innocent marvak villages. They slаughtered almost the whole marvak population. Chldren, women, elders were buthchered. Women, men and children raped and then killed. From the whole number of 60 000 Christian Marvaks survived less then 3000 and from the 10 000 moslem Marvaks survived only 200. The survivors escaped to Bulgaria were they setteled throughout the country. They lost their unique folk costumes and songs. In fact most of Veda Slovena consists from songs of moslem Marvaks.
    Now in the place where Marvaks once lived, live greeks settlers from Asia Minor. In fact we can see some slavic traditions but is mainly to hellenisised bulgarians from Thrace who also settled there.

    http://bg.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%9C%D1%8A%D1%80%D0%B2%D0%B0%D1%86%D0%B8

    The Early Slavs. Culture and Society in Early Medieval Eastern Europe. P M Barford.
    [img width=558 height=700]http://desmond.imageshack.us/Himg440/scaled.php?server=440&filename=theearlyslavsbypmbarfor.jpg&res=landing” />

    #358778

    Anonymous

    The Dulebs (Dulebes) or (more correctly) Dulebi (Russian: Дуле́бы, Ukrainian: Дуліби) were one of the tribal unions of Early East Slavs between the 6th (still questionable) and the 10th centuries. Dulebi were among the twelve East Slavic tribes mentioned in the Primary Chronicle written by Nestor. (See the Dulo of Bulgaria.)

    Historians are still not sure of the exact location of the native territory of the Dulebi due to sparseness of numerous traces of the Dulebi presence, found by researchers in Central and Eastern Europe. It is possible that the Dulebi tribe formed in the times of the Roman Empire somewhere in the vicinity of the Germanic or Bulgarian tribes (see Shambat Brother or Khan Koubrat) and later settled in different regions. Some medieval sources mention the Dulebs' presence in Western Volhynia, today's Czech Republic, Middle Danube, between Lake Balaton and the Mursa River.

    According to the Primary Chronicle, Dulebi suffered greatly from the invasion of the Avars in the late 6th – early 7th century. In 907, the Dulebian unit took part in Oleg's military campaign against Czargrad. The Dulebs and their ruler were mentioned in one of the works of an Arab geographer Al-Masudi.

    It appears that the Dulebi tribal union disintegrated in the 10th century, assimilated with the Volhynians and Buzhans and became part of the Kievan Rus'.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dulebes

    A map: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/ea/Plemiona_wschodniosłowiańskie.png

    Read also about the Principality of Lower Pannonia or the Balaton Principality and Pannonian Slavs ->  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Principality_of_Lower_Pannonia

    "The Slavic people of that time were weakly differentiated, speaking closely related dialects of the same common language. The inhabitants of the Lower Pannonia Principality were most probably closely related to each of neighboring Slavic people: Great Moravians (Western Slavs) to the north, Karantanians and Pannonians Slavs to the west and the south, and Serbs to the south-east, providing the bridge between those Slavic states and tribal unions."

    #358779

    Anonymous

    Can Slovens be cosidered extinct too? They are better known as Ilmen Slavs.

    Ok this is probably fake info but according to one Slovene source Novgorod was originaly called Slovensk. ;D Anyway i see one part of Novogorod is called Yaroslavovo Dvorishche and Dvorišče means house yard in Slovene language. Do other languages have this word too? :)

    #358780

    Anonymous
    [size=12pt]Milceni[/size]
    [table]
    [tr]
    [td][img height=150]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/ee/Markgraftschaft_Meissen_1000.PNG/800px-Markgraftschaft_Meissen_1000.PNG” />[/td]
    [td][img height=150]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/11/Central_Europe%2C_919-1125.jpg/759px-Central_Europe%2C_919-1125.jpg” />[/td]
    [/tr]
    [/table]
    Introduction

    [hr]
    The Milceni or Milzeni (Czech: Milčané; German: Milzener; Polish: Milczanie) were a West Slavic tribe, who settled in the present-day Upper Lusatia region. They were first mentioned in the middle of the 9th century AD by the Bavarian Geographer, who wrote of 30 civitates which possibly had fortifications. They were gradually conquered by Germans during the 10th century. Modern descendents of the Milceni are the Sorbs of the Free State of Saxony, Germany.

    History

    [hr]
    The Milceni travelled to Upper Lusatia in the 7th century during the Migration Period. The exact borders of their settlement area are disputed. It is generally accepted that their fielded land had fruitful loess soil and had dimensions of approximately 50 km from east to west and 20 km from north to south. The northern border was in swampy and partially unfertile terrain, while the southern border formed part of the Lausitzer Bergland. The hills of Burkau near Kamenz formed a natural boundary for the Milceni in the west, while their territory bordered that of the Besunzane in the east. The boundaries of the tribe have also been given as the Pulsnitz River in the west and the Kwisa River in the east.
    The Ortenburg castle of Bautzen is built around fortifications originally constructed by the Milceni. Charles the Younger, son of Charlemagne, defeated the Milceni and burnt their fortress in 806. Henry the Fowler, King of the Germans, defeated the Slavic tribe in 932 and demanded conversion to Christianity, although this was only partially successful. Emperor Otto I defeated the Lusatians in 963 and placed them under the rule of Margrave Gero. The Milceni were finally subjugated by Margrave Ekkehard I of Meissen ca. 990 and had their territory incorporated into the Holy Roman Empire.[4] The Milceni were then gradually Germanized or merged with the Lusatians of Lower Lusatia into the Sorbian ethnic group.
    During the 10th–12th centuries, the region of Bautzen was known in written sources (e.g. Thietmar of Merseburg) as Gau Milsca, followed by Land Budissin. In Polish, Upper Lusatia was known as Milsko until the 15th century. The Milceni are also mentioned in the 12th century Song of Roland ("the second of big-headed men from Misnes– along the vertebrae all down their backs these men have tufted bristles, just like hogs").

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