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  • #358796

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    What's the difference between these two pronunciations?

    sjem and sem … according to Google Translator

    #358797

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    What's the difference between these two pronunciations?

    In the first instance, the hard pronunciation of the letter m’ is used, in the second instance – it's soft/

    #358798

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    In the first instance, the hard pronunciation of the letter m’ is used, in the second instance – it's soft/

    I don't know what a soft m and a hard m is. Is that like one is loud and the other is quiet? And is Cvetinov's explanation correct?

    #358799

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I don't know what a soft m and a hard m is. Is that like one is loud and the other is quiet? And is Cvetinov's explanation correct?

    It's like л and ль > љ, only I think Russians have a more softer pronunciation than we do.

    #358800

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I don't know what a soft m and a hard m is. Is that like one is loud and the other is quiet? And is Cvetinov's explanation correct?

    There is plenty of information on the web on soft and hard consonants used in the Russian language.

    #358801

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    It's like л and ль > љ, only I think Russians have a more softer pronunciation than we do.

    I don't know what soft and hard is in pronunciations. ::)

    And concerning your example, what would ть, дь and сь sound like?

    #358802

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I don't know what soft and hard is in pronunciations. ::)

    And concerning your example, what would ть, дь and сь sound like?

    Find a Russian word with these constructs, put it into Google Translator press to listen, and there you have it.

    #358803

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    There is plenty of information on the web on soft and hard consonants used in the Russian language.

    I was reading and it told me that the difference is in arching your tongue (their example, lip and leap). But how do you replicate that sound in семь and сем?

    #358804

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I was reading and it told me that the difference is in arching your tongue (their example, lip and leap). But how do you replicate that sound in семь and сем?

    Well, of course I'm not a native speaker of Russian, but we were told that if the is a ь present, try to pronounce the consonant as if you are about to say a "j"-sound after it (not pronouncing the j of course) – so tip your tongue to the top of your mouth afterwards.

    For example: брат -> /brat/ and брать -> /brat(j)/
    Also, the ь makes the "a"-sound in брать slightly longer.

    Hope this helps, and that I'm not mistaken of course ;D Once again: this is how we learned it in pronounciation class ;)

    #358805

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Well, of course I'm not a native speaker of Russian, but we were told that if the is a ь present, try to pronounce the consonant as if you are about to say a "j"-sound after it (not pronouncing the j of course) – so tip your tongue to the top of your mouth afterwards.

    For example: брат -> /brat/ and брать -> /brat(j)/
    Also, the ь makes the "a"-sound in брать slightly longer.

    Hope this helps, and that I'm not mistaken of course ;D Once again: this is how we learned it in pronounciation class ;)

    How is it possible to to pronounce the T while touching the top of your mouth with your tongue? It's like your only doing half the sound of T (without the teh at the end).

    #358806

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Well, of course I'm not a native speaker of Russian, but we were told that if the is a ь present, try to pronounce the consonant as if you are about to say a "j"-sound after it (not pronouncing the j of course) – so tip your tongue to the top of your mouth afterwards.

    For example: брат -> /brat/ and брать -> /brat(j)/
    Also, the ь makes the "a"-sound in брать slightly longer.

    Hope this helps, and that I'm not mistaken of course ;D Once again: this is how we learned it in pronounciation class ;)

    Thanks for helping me out.  :)

    But I think that’s possible with voiceless consonants ‘t’.  Try to say ‘j’ at the end of the word семь while the sound of the letter ‘m’ is made using lips.  You will need close your lips and you won’t be able to start pronouncing ‘j’  having your mouth closed. :)

    #358807

    Anonymous

    Fortunately, I as a native Slovak speaker know what the soft and hard pronunciation means.  8)  :D

    #358808

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    But I think that’s possible with voiceless consonants ‘t’.  Try to say ‘j’ at the end of the word семь while the sound of the letter ‘m’ is made using lips.  You will need close your lips and you won’t be able to start pronouncing ‘j’  having your mouth closed. :)

    I don't hear a difference :(

    #358809

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    The written Russian language is standardised; however, the modern spoken language is not.

    There are two or three major dialects recognised in Russia: northern, middle Russian (as in between northern and southern dialects) and southern dialect. There are several subgroups in each dialect.

    For example, in Moscow people use the letter ‘a’ instead of ‘o’ even if the word is written with ‘o’. For example, Moskva is pronounced as Maskva, moloko is pronounced as malako, voda as vada etc. In Nizhny Novgorod, Vladimir an other regions just north of Moscow the letter ‘o’ is used i.e.Moskva, moloko, voda.
    In southern dialect the letter ‘g’ is pronounced softly.

    There are other differences in pronunciation and vocabulary in different regions.
    For example, сем instead of семь, голуп instead of голубь, любоф instead of любовь.

    It’s not always easy to locate the region to which a particular dialect belongs to but we often can hear that the speaker is from another region. I can pick up dialects from North, South, Moscow, Russians from Ukraine, from middle Asia and possibly from Ural region.

    Muscovites are very good at picking up different dialects because they often meet  people visiting Moscow from all over the country.

    Thanks for this info! ;) Anyway please tell me how different is Novgorodian from others? I mean differences in accent, words, etc.

    #358810

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Anyway please tell me how different is Novgorodian from others? I mean differences in accent, words, etc.

    Yeah, I'm curious here as well.

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