• This topic has 4 voices and 8 replies.
Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #344260

    Anonymous

    The so-called Fojnica Armorial (Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian Fojnički grbovnik, also known as Ilirski grbovnik "Illyrian armorial") is an early modern roll of arms of the Balkans. The manuscript is named for the Franciscan monastery in Fojnica (some 20 km from Sarajevo, Bosnia Eyalet, now in Bosnia and Herzegovina), where it was kept.

    The presence of the manuscript in the Fojnica monastery is first attested in the year 1800. Alexander Soloviev dated it to in between 1675 and 1688, i.e. in the context of the revolts against Ottoman rule during the Great Turkish War. Other scholars have proposed dates of the late 16th or early 17th century. The title page of the armorial itself purports a creation date of 1340.

    The manuscript is an important source of the classical heraldry of the Balkans peninsula, alongside the Korenić-Neorić Armorial of 1595, and the "Illyrian Armorial" (Society of Antiquaries of London MS.54) collected by Edward Bourchier, 4th Earl of Bath before 1637.

    The manuscript contains a total of 139 coats of arms. It begins with a depiction of the Bogorodica, saints Cosmas and Damian, and Saint Jerome.

    image
    image
    image

    There follows a title page, written in Cyrillic, which attributes the work to one Stanislav Rubčić, in honour of king Stephen Nemanja, with the date 1340.

    image

    Rodoslovje Bosanskoga, aliti Iliričkoga i Serpskoga vladania; zajedno postavljeno po Stanislavu Rubčiću popu. Na slavu Stipana Nemanjića, cara Serbljena i Bošnjaka 1340

    There is an added note in Latin, dated 1800, which testifies that the manuscript had been kept in Fojnica monastery "from time immemorial". Then there is as page showing a combined coat of arms consisting of eleven parts. After this, there are ten coats of arms of late medieval realms of the region, Macedonia (Macedoniae), "Illyria" (Vllvriae), Bosnia (Bosnae), Dalmatia (Dalmatie), Croatia (Crovatiae), Slavonia (Slavoniae), Bulgaria (Bvlgariae), Serbia (Svrbiae), Rascia (Rasciae) and "Primordia" (Primordiae),followed by coats of arms of noble families.

    image
    image
    image
    image
    image
    image
    image
    image
    image

    the rest of arms:
    image

    #397636

    Anonymous
    [size=12pt]Korenić-Neorić Armorial (copy of the Ohmućević Armorial)[/size]
    basis of the Fojnica Armorial

    [img height=400]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/24/Imperial_Coat_of_arms_of_Serbia_%281346%E2%80%931371%29.svg/400px-Imperial_Coat_of_arms_of_Serbia_%281346%E2%80%931371%29.svg.png” />

    [size=8pt]Modern redrawing of the (fictional) "coat of arms of Tsar Dušan" (r. 1331-1346) presented in the Korenić-Neorić Armorial. The field is divided into nine parts, representing the coats of arms of Macedonia, Slavonia, Bosnia Bulgaria, Dalmatia, Serbia, Croatia, Rascia, and "Primordia". In addition, there are two inescutcheons, intended as showing the coats of arms of the Nemanjić and Kotromanić dynasties.[/size]

    The Korenić-Neorić Armorial is a 1595 copy of the lost original of the Ohmućević Armorial (Ohmućević grbovnik) commissioned by Petar Ohmućević (d. 1599), a Spanish admiral of Ragusan origin, at some point between 1584 and 1594. It is an example of the earliest ("Interconfessional") form of Illyrism, which formed the ideological basis for the later rise of nationalism in the Balkans.

    The armorial combines historical (late medieval) with fictional coats of arms to construct the notion of an "Illyrian Empire". This Empire happened to coincide exactly with the sphere of interest of the Spanish Empire in the Balkans at the time, and hence also Petar's own. The personal purpose pursued by Petar Ohmućević was that of confirming his own "Illyrian" nobility after he rose to the rank of admiral in the Spanish navy. In order to qualify for the greater chivalric orders of Habsburg Spain at the time, it was necessary to prove descent from eight noble and purely Catholic great-grandparents. Ohmućević was granted the status of nobleman in 1594, which is taken as the terminus ante quem of the armorial. Ohmućević's armorial can thus be considered a personal project in origin, or even a fraud, as he invented genealogy in order to qualify for the coveted title, but its influence turned out to be immense, becoming, as it did, the foundation of Balkanic or "Illyrist" heraldry in general. An important source for Ohmućević's heraldic inventions was the Wappenbüchlein by Virgil Solis (1555), which itself contains fictional arms of "foreign kingdoms". The Korenić-Neorić Armorial of 1595 is printed on paper, in a format of 21 cm x 14.5 cm, on 168 sheets. The Ohmućević Armorial is the main source used by the Fojnica Armorial, which is for this reason dated to after 1595, probably to the 1670s, and later "Illyrist" armorials compiled in the early modern period.
    [hr]

    Didn't you already make a similar thread, Slavic Heraldry?

    #397637

    Anonymous

    Thanks for the input. Yes, I made the thread about Slavic heraldry in general  but this one is intended for providing background information of this unique armorial in Bosnian history. ;)

    #397638

    Anonymous

    Which lands are Vllvriae and Primordiae? Ok its probably Illyria and Primorje but where was that supposed to be back then?

    #397639

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Which lands are Vllvriae and Primordiae? Ok its probably Illyria and Primorje but where was that supposed to be back then?

    If you have read yourself through you would have noticed, that the majority of it was made up by Petar Ohmućević in the year 1599, while the other part was taken from other sources like the Wappenbüchlein by Virgil Solis (1555). In other words some of the coat-of-arms as well as the lands they present are nothing but his own work of fiction and not actual historical symbols or lands.

    [table]
    [tr]
    [td][img width=488 height=700]http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglitData/image/solis1555/1/0008.jpg” />[/td]
    [td][img width=488 height=700]http://digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/diglitData/image/solis1555/1/0019.jpg” />[/td]
    [/tr]
    [/table]
    – Wappenbüchlein by Virgil Solis (1555)

    #397640

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    If you have read yourself through you would have noticed, that the majority of it was made up by Petar Ohmućević in the year 1599, while the other part was taken from other sources like the Wappenbüchlein by Virgil Solis (1555). In other words the majority of the coat-of-arms as well as the lands they present are nothing but his own fiction, not related to actuall history.

    For Primordiae i am not sure. Do you think it is fake? I thought only CoA's are fiction but not lands themself. Oh well for Illyrian it is true that it is probably fake since Illyria was a broad term having different meanings at different times or situations. I mean later in 19th century Illyria was also; ;D

    image

    #397641

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    For Primordiae i am not sure. Do you think it is fake? I thought only CoA's are fiction but not lands themself. Oh well for Illyrian it is true that it is probably fake since Illyria was a broad term having different meanings at different times or situations. I mean later in 19th century Illyria was also; ;D

    You may look through the charters of the medieval Lords of that time, that goverend the regions. Dalibor may help you with that. There you will see which lands did exist and which were made up. Illyria was probably made up. Primorje (Primordiae) however could correspond to the littoral regions. As for symbols, I know of no sources other that the presented armorial that would support its credibility, meaning he (Petar Ohmućević) invented them as long as we do not see sources that predate him.

    #397642

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    You may look through the charters of the medieval Lords of that time, that goverend the regions. Dalibor may help you with that. There you will see which lands did exist and which were made up. Illyria was probably made up. Primorje (Primordiae) however could correspond to the littoral regions. As for symbols, I know of no sources other that the presented armorial that would support its credibility, meaning he (Petar Ohmućević) invented them as long as we do not see sources that predate him.

    Ok thanks for info. :)

    #397643

    Anonymous

    It was a proven FAKE lol :)

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Slavorum

13 User(s) Online Join Server
  • Asafar ⵣⴰⴽⴰⵔⵉⴰ ⴰⵙⴰⴼⴰⵔ
  • Tujev
  • Piachu
  • кошка
  • Glockamole
  • GOGA