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  • #341797

    Anonymous
    About the anthem

    Hey, Slovaks – later modified to Hey, Slavs in various Slavic languages – is an anthemic song dedicated to Slavic peoples. Its first lyrics were written in 1834 under the title Hej, Slováci (Hej, Slovaks) by the Slovak romantic poet and prosaist Samuel Tomášik and it has since served as the anthem of the Pan-Slavic movement, the anthem of the first Slovak republic, the anthem of the Sokol physical education and political movement, the anthem of the SFR Yugoslavia and the transitional anthem of the State Union of Serbia and Montenegro. The song is also considered to be the second, unofficial anthem of the Slovaks. Its melody is based on Mazurek Dąbrowskiego, which has been also the anthem of Poland since 1926, but the Yugoslav variation is much slower and more accentuated.

    image

    The song was written by the Slovak Lutheran pastor, poet and historian Samuel Tomášik while he was visiting Prague in 1834. He was appalled that German was more commonly heard in the streets of Prague than Czech. He wrote in his diary:

    "If mother Prague, the pearl of the Western Slav world, is to be lost in a German sea, what awaits my dear homeland, Slovakia, which looks to Prague for spiritual nourishment? Burdened by that thought, I remembered the old Polish song Jeszcze Polska nie zginęła, póki my żyjemy ("Poland has not yet perished as long as we live."). That familiar melody caused my heart to erupt with defiant Hej, Slováci, ešte naša slovenská reč žije ("Hey, Slovaks, our Slovak language still lives")… I ran to my room, lit a candle and wrote down three verses into my diary in pencil. The song was finished in a moment."
    Diary of Samuel Tomášik, Sunday, 2 November 1834

    Hej, Slováci!

    God Parom (Perun) in the poem

    SLOVAK LYRICS

    Hej, Slováci, ešte naša
    slovenská reč žije,
    Dokiaľ naše verné srdce
    za náš národ bije.

    Žije, žije, duch slovenský,
    bude žiť na veky,
    Hrom a peklo, márne vaše
    proti nám sú vzteky!

    Jazyka dar sveril nám Boh,
    Boh náš hromovládny
    ,
    Nesmie nám ho teda vyrvať
    na tom svete žiadny;

    I nechže je koľko ľudí,
    toľko čertov v svete;
    Boh je s nami: kto proti nám,
    toho Parom zmetie.

    I nechže sa aj nad nami
    hrozná búrka vznesie,
    Skala puká, dub sa láme
    a zem nech sa trasie;

    My stojíme stále pevne,
    ako múry hradné
    Čierna zem pohltí toho,
    kto odstúpi zradne!

    [size=8pt]ENGLISH VERSIFICATION

    Ho, ye Slovaks! our beloved
    language still surviveth;
    While the faithful heart within us
    for our nation striveth;

    Yes, the Slovak spirit liveth;
    it will live forever
    Hell and thunder, 'gainst us raging,
    vain is your endeavor.

    God to us our tongue entrusted,
    God, who sways the thunder;
    Who on earth then shall presume this
    gift from us to sunder!

    Though the earth were filled with
    demons, our rights assailing,
    We defy them. God is with us,
    His strong arm prevailing.

    Though about us storms are raging,
    bringing devastation,
    Rocks disrupting, oaks uprooting,
    shaking earth's foundation,

    Yet we stand like castle walls,
    our vested rights asserting;
    May the earth engulf the traitor
    from our ranks deserting.
    [/size]
    ______________________

    In the poem can be found three forms of naming the Perun used by the Slovak people :

    Hrom = Thunder
    Boh hromovládny = God the Thunderer
    Parom = Perun

    The God Parom is in the poem perceived as the one, who gave the language to the Slovaks, stands together with them to protect them and strikes on those who act against the people.

    Slovak romantic writers were significantly inspired in the Slavic mythology, culture and history. They weren't worried about 'glorifying' of the pagan God Parom even despite of the fact, many of them were Protestant or Catholic priests. Seeing that Parom lived in the folk language (and still lives), there was no reason to eliminate his significance by addressing the words to the Slovaks.
    Their critics considered it as the expression of misbelief and blasphemy.

    #355231

    Anonymous

    Anthem is great, but most people here reminds on communism and socialist Yugoslavia, thats why people always boo on stadium when it was performed.

    #355232

    Anonymous

    But it shows you that there is no real culture behind Yugoslav anthem, if they even took melody from Dąbrowski.
    Poland vs. Yugoslavia match during communist times must have been entertaining at times of anthem singing.  ;D

    #355233

    Anonymous

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=40uq-aiRMik#
    I like this song very much. It has a nice melody. I can enjoy it without any political feelings.

    #355234

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I like this song very much. It has a nice melody. I can enjoy it without any political feelings.

    Me too, but most people don't.

    Also nice Slovak song/hymn Sme Slovaci sme Gardisti
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnTBZCxw_Sk#

    #355235

    Anonymous

    Dervan, from where do you know the song posted by you? :) Or more precisely, are you usually looking for such songs?

    #355236

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Dervan, from where do you know the song posted by you? :) Or more precisely, are you usually looking for such songs?

    Yes, I like marches and hymns, that's why that song is better than Hlinka guard hymn (too cheerfull).

    #355237

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Anthem is great, but most people here reminds on communism and socialist Yugoslavia, thats why people always boo on stadium when it was performed.

    Why shouldn't it remind on YUGOSLAVIA, it was the greatest country ever and those who boo at it are ignorant and will be the first to sing it again but it will be too late. 8)

    #355238

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Me too, but most people don't.

    Also nice Slovak song/hymn Sme Slovaci sme Gardisti
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnTBZCxw_Sk#

    Fascista Song :)

    I nechže je koľko ľudí,
    toľko čertov v svete;
    Boh je s nami: kto proti nám,
    toho Parom zmetie.

    Čerti a Černobog? :)

    #355239

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Čerti a Černobog? :)

    Čerti means devils.

    #355240

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Čerti means devils.

    Já vím, ale zda nemůže být spojitost mezi čerty a Černobogem? :) Pak to o té Černé zemi.. :)

    Sice Černá Zem se říká i Ukrajině (páč je úrodná)

    #355241

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Já vím, ale zda nemůže být spojitost mezi čerty a Černobogem? :) Pak to o té Černé zemi.. :)

    Sice Černá Zem se říká i Ukrajině (páč je úrodná)

    Chert was a demon from our mythology, his name is preserved in Russian word Chort meaning the devil

    #355242

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Why shouldn't it remind on YUGOSLAVIA, it was the greatest country ever and those who boo at it are ignorant and will be the first to sing it again but it will be too late. 8)

    Both Yugoslavias suppressed ethnic identity, tradition and nationalism of its main (constitutive) nations. That's one good reason.
    I think most of the members of minorities in Serbia share your opinion.

    Quote:
    Fascista Song :)

    Regardless, song sounds nice.

    #355243

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Regardless, song sounds nice.

    Ustaša, Chetniks, ROA, Bandera, etc.. songs is "good". Propaganda must be qualited. :)

    #355244

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    But it shows you that there is no real culture behind Yugoslav anthem, if they even took melody from Dąbrowski.
    Poland vs. Yugoslavia match during communist times must have been entertaining at times of anthem singing.  ;D

    Melody is only similar to Mazurka Dombrovskega but still far from being the same. Even the oldest known written melody of Hej Slováci isn't a copy of Maz. Dom.  :)

    I regret that the part with Perun is lost in South Slavic translations, though the Slovene translation is closest to the original of all South Slavic ones. Does anyone know why there are no East Slavic versions?

    Quote:
    Regardless, song sounds nice.

    As long as you don't go to Germany and sing loud "Deutschlandlied" in public, it's OK. Anyhow, someone who likes to sing Partisan songs isn't any less controverse than someone who sings fascist songs IMO. And I agree with you – those songs have something that forces you to sing along.  ;D

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