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  • #345911

    Anonymous

    With the unveiling of Obamacare here, I am very curious to hear opinions and stories about health care systems from each of your respective Slavic countries. 

    Not just you individually, but maybe some experiences from your friends, families, etc.  Good, bad, neutral. 

    I might move for a while because currently access to health care here is so difficult, so I'm very interested in what everyone has to say.

    #423112

    Anonymous

    Good, long waits, but always get taken care of.

    #423113

    Anonymous

    Public: long waits, awful service, obsolete equipment (though it started to change a little with the equipment recently).
    Private: no queues, great service, perfect equipment, awfully expensive.

    #423114

    Anonymous

    Quite satisfied.The staff is very professional,and they get things done,even if their equipment is sometimes lacking.

    P.S.-What Svarožič described sounds like a nightmare,and I hope such a Đuiš system never gets implemented in here as an only option of quality healthcare.

    #423115

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Quite satisfied.The staff is very professional,and they get things done,even if their equipment is sometimes lacking.

    P.S.-What Svarožič described sounds like a nightmare,and I hope such a Đuiš system never gets implemented in here as an only option of quality healthcare.

    The public one was inherited from the Soviet times. Though those days it was actually really good and free, even some sophisticated surgeries.

    Now the stuff is professional too, but it lacks of support from the government. I really worship all the doctors and nurses who are going to work to the public clinics as it's a pure enthusiasm which helps to make it work. The pays are soo low.

    But some clinics implemented a really good scheme, having two sections – public and private within one clinic with the same stuff, for the doctors to help people for free and also to have the opportunity to earn good money with this combinated working schedule.

    #423116

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Now the stuff is professional too, but it lacks of support from the government.

    Why wouldn't the government support state funded healthcare?

    #423117

    Anonymous

    One thing I forgot to mention: the ambulances in my state are slow. They don't have enough ambulances and there isn't enough money to employ more. In contrast, a pizza can reach your house before an ambulance can.

    #423118

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Why wouldn't the government support state funded healthcare?

    Great question! A rhetorical one.

    Most of the budget resources are spent to the military sphere. These days we have a 2014 budget uncovered. Financing of education in 2014 will be reduced by 12.9% of the level in 2013, healthcare – by 8.6%, and utilities – by 23.7%. Financing of the military raised 60% for last 3 years.

    So thats the answer.

    #423119

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Great question! A rhetorical one.

    Most of the budget resources are spent to the military sphere. These days we have a 2014 budget uncovered. Financing of education in 2014 will be reduced by 12.9% of the level in 2013, healthcare – by 8.6%, and utilities – by 23.7%. Financing of the military raised 60% for last 3 years.

    So thats the answer.

    Does the military really need all that funding? Are military hospitals part of the public healthcare system or are they private? It looks like to me Russia is building it's military to show off rather than to put into action, or am I wrong?

    #423120

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Great question! A rhetorical one.

    Most of the budget resources are spent to the military sphere. These days we have a 2014 budget uncovered. Financing of education in 2014 will be reduced by 12.9% of the level in 2013, healthcare – by 8.6%, and utilities – by 23.7%. Financing of the military raised 60% for last 3 years.

    So thats the answer.

    How is healthcare financed in Russia, Svarožič? Do employers hold all the tax burden? This has been the difficulty with implementing any kind of public health service in the United States. People here are very anti-tax.  Do you pay anything for healthcare or prescriptions if utilizing the public services?

    #423121

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Does the military really need all that funding? Are military hospitals part of the public healthcare system or are they private? It looks like to me Russia is building it's military to show off rather than to put into action, or am I wrong?

    Of course it's a show off. An attempt to balance the bipolar world. As we can see the latest Near East conflicts started by the USA were criticised by Russia's officials. Of course I do not 100% beleive Kremlin (ahaha), but there is no evidence all that Russian military power is going to be applied, as, hell, it will tear down the whole humanity. The military industry here is called "Oboronnaja promyshlennost" – a defense industry – so it's about containment, yeah. I wish  :)

    Quote:
    How is healthcare financed in Russia, Svarožič? Do employers hold all the tax burden? This has been the difficulty with implementing any kind of public health service in the United States. People here are very anti-tax.  Do you pay anything for healthcare or prescriptions if utilizing the public services?

    It depends on a company. My previous workplace had an agreement with an insurance company so I was provided with free private healthcare (except dental of course). Now I haven't got a healthcare insurance, though paid more, luckily :)

    If someone is having a paid corporative healthcare insurance he is not able to visit public clinics, but it is not controlled so much, so I was visiting local doctors when it was neccessary with my public healthcare list, and it was ok. Probably I was too critical in the first post here, as I remember all the doctors were really nice in the public ones, it is just that soviet spirit and grumbling babushkas in the queues which makes it hard to stay there for a long time.

    But public dental care is a mess. I got my tooth totally destroyed there :( So I had to visit a private clinic to fix all the s***.

    #423122

    Anonymous
    Quote:

    It depends on a company. My previous workplace had an agreement with an insurance company so I was provided with free private healthcare (except dental of course). Now I haven't got a healthcare insurance, though paid more, luckily :)

    If someone is having a paid corporative healthcare insurance he is not able to visit public clinics, but it is not controlled so much, so I was visiting local doctors when it was neccessary with my public healthcare list, and it was ok. Probably I was too critical in the first post here, as I remember all the doctors were really nice in the public ones, it is just that soviet spirit and grumbling babushkas in the queues which makes it hard to stay there for a long time.

    But public dental care is a mess. I got my tooth totally destroyed there :( So I had to visit a private clinic to fix all the s***.

    Thank you so much for this answer.  :) Nice to ask an actual citizen of a country rather than rely on a Wikipedia page. I have to say this: at least you have the option of the public clinic, even if it may be unreliable and congested.  I live in the only industrialized democracy that doesn't provide healthcare to all its citizens.  ::)  Now we have the Obamacare nightmare to contend with.

    As far as your tooth, we have plenty of private dentists in America who are quite skilled in the art of dental destruction, too  :D Finding affordable, quality dental care here is always a challenge.

    #423123

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    The military industry here is called "Oboronnaja promyshlennost" – a defense industry – so it's about containment, yeah. I wish  :)

    It's also about 'осваивание государственного бюджета силовиками и чиновниками'. A lot of budget money  go missing surfacing in off-shore banks in places such as Cyprus. The biggest problem is corruption among government officials  in Russia in my opinion.

    As for healthcare in Russia I'd rather not comment. We get to hear aweful stories about public healthcare in regional Russia.

    #423124

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I live in the only industrialized democracy that doesn't provide healthcare to all its citizens. 

    I'm sure that the american citizens are looking it from a bright side,and are grateful that their government can at least aford to liberate the countries such as Iraq,Afghanistan,and almost Syria with their dollars.

    #423125

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I'm sure that the american citizens are looking it from a bright side,and are grateful that their government can at least aford to liberate the countries such as Iraq,Afghanistan,and almost Syria with their dollars.

    [IMG]http://imageshack.us/a/img541/8067/zgd.gif” />

    …um, no.

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