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  • #346616

    Anonymous

    Hello All! I’m hungarian with 100% slavic roots. Unfortunately my grandparents-who live in northeastern Hungary- died when i was a kid, so i don’t know exactly our correct origin. They were the last members of my family who speak a strange slavic-hungarian mix. My parents didn’t interested about our origin(what a shame). So now we totally assimilated. Despite i don’t know exactly anything most likely we are carpatho rusyns(lemkos) and slovaks. The mix of the two. Because slavs came back in northern hungary after the turkish occupation in 18. century. So dear all, try to help me, please. I have surnames from 19. century(unfortunately hungarianiazed versions i guess, but maybe you can help) So, are these rusyn, slovak, polish, ukranian or anything else? thank you: 1.Orechovszky/Orechovski/Orechotzki 2.Bukovszky/Bukovsky 3. Belyo/Belya/Bejo 4. Karpi 5. Rebetsak/Rebecsak 6. Palko 7. Mitrik 8. Volosonovsky/Volosinovsky/Wolosonowski. Plus some words (what i heard) :bobajka, zamiska,ucikoj

    #424034

    Anonymous

    Surnames with suffix -ski, are specific Polish, though they are present also among Ukrainians and Belarusians.

    #424036

    Anonymous

    Are you aware of a meaning of “specific” that’s closer to “not really specific”, Gauis, or do you like to contradict yourself in the same sentence?

    #424039

    Anonymous

    Wolosonowski – sounds Polish
    Orechovszky – sounds Slovak
    Bukovsky – sounds Ukrainian/Russian
    Bejo – doesn’t sound Slavic at all
    Rebecsak – sounds non-slavic a.k.a. Hungarian

    but what the hell do i know i’m a cat

    #424042

    Anonymous

    First three are Polish but it doesnt mean much. Certainly you have Polish ancestry but it could be very far and only on male side. I’m Polish with Ukrainian surname and I’ e worked once with Ukrainian with Polish surname. I know few generations back on my “ukrainian” side and no one I know have anything to do with Ukraine.
    Also surnames with suffix -cki , -ski are typically Polish but almost all southern Slavs have some Polish ancestry and for example in Macedonia such surnames are typical for them. They often are like some greek words with ending -ski or pretty Polish sounding like Pejanovski for example.

    #424044
    Boris V.
    Boris V.
    Participant
    @dedushka

    @GolemyGniew wouldn’t -ski suffix be generally Slavic, in fact maybe even Bulgarian in origin?

    #424045

    Anonymous

    What makes you think that? -ski ,-cki ending is typical only for people or nations with Polish ancestry (especially Ukraine and Macedonia). Does it appears in Bulgarian also? I mean Bulgarian language most of all. Polish language suppouse to be closest one to proto-Slavic and Old Church Slavonic is simply old-Bulgarian.

    #424049
    Boris V.
    Boris V.
    Participant
    @dedushka

    @GolemyGniew, What i meant Bulgarians have it and they have no Polish ancestry. Ski is proto-Slavic i believe.

    #424050

    Anonymous

    The “ski” ending in Bulgaria/Macedonia is unrelated to Poland.

    #424051

    Anonymous

    Probably its proto-Slavic then.

    #396679

    Anonymous

    The surname ending “ski” normally comes in the family name related to a very distant person with some exceptions. The ending “ov’ can be also in a family name but related to somebody in fresh memory of the family or might be even alive. In Macedonia there is a mixture of both and even some others like Chasule, Chekrezi, Kocare, Prlicko, Lape and so on which are family names as well but I believe not related to any person.

    #396681

    Anonymous

    Bulgarians used mostly patronyms well into the 20th century, so odds are you won’t be able to trace your ancestry by your last name, if you have any bulgarian ancestry. Also, MegaArgus01, you seem to be onto something there, because indeed names ending in “ski” seem to be more generic, whereas those ending in ov/ev/ovski derive from a personal name and are likely a “permanent” patronym.

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