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  • #344762

    Anonymous

    I am trying to work out the nationality/ethnicity of some of my family members who were from modern day Czech Republic/Bohemia in 1800's up until 1890. My Austrian great grandmothers parents were immigrants from Horschitz Bohemia ( now Hořice and Miletín  in the Jičín District of  Hradec Králové Region )  All the men were either called Franz or Johann (German version spelling) most of the women were called Anna or Maria.
    example Franz Nadvornik, Johann Weinar/Vejnar, Anna Haman, Maria Petera, Barbera Burda ect

    here is a list of their surnames, Nadvornik, Haman, Weinar/Vejnar, Burda, Petera, Jansa, Peceny

    Any information regarding their nationality or ethnicity would be helpful even the demographics of that region of Bohemia.

    thank you

    #405035

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    example Franz Nadvornik, Johann Weinar/Vejnar, Anna Haman, Maria Petera, Barbera Burda ect

    here is a list of their surnames, Nadvornik, Haman, Weinar/Vejnar, Burda, Petera, Jansa, Peceny

    Any information regarding their nationality or ethnicity would be helpful even the demographics of that region of Bohemia.

    thank you

    Nadvornik, Burda, Pečeny and Vejnar are Slavic hence probably Czech, altough they could be Germanized Czechs.

    #405036

    Anonymous

    In Austro-hungarian era sometimes its hard to tell to which ethnic identity one belonged. Surnames are sure Slavic in origin but if your old folk were Vindišar's this we can't tell. Only you or your relatives can know from your family. ;D

    #405037

    Anonymous

    I forgot to say these names are not proof of German identity. In old documents my ancestors names and surnames are often written differently in that era. Sometimes in German orthography other times more akin to real Slavic names and surnames. Purely depended on priests and officials. Its not rare that same priest or official wrote same persons name and surname in two different ways. Wouldn't believe it if i saw it. :D

    #405038

    Anonymous

    Thanks for your feed back :)
    Well we are not sure what they considered themselves. I guess my nationality my great grandmother was Austrian seeing she was born and grew up in Lower Austria but ethnicity is not so clear as to how they viewed themselves. 

    Did you have to be a Germanised Czech to be allowed to relocate to Austria Proper? or could any Czech migrate to that area of the Empire (lower austria) ?

    I was told Vejnar (also on some documents spelt as Weinar) is of German origin and is a variation of the common German surname
    ''Weiner/Wagner''. I was also told '' Haman'' is a German surname  that many Czechs have still till this day. Any ideas If any of this information is correct ?

    Cheers

    #405039

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I forgot to say these names are not proof of German identity. In old documents my ancestors names and surnames are often written differently in that era. Sometimes in German orthography other times more akin to real Slavic names and surnames. Purely depended on priests and officials. Its not rare that same priest or official wrote same persons name and surname in two different ways. Wouldn't believe it if i saw it. :D

    I have quite a few German speaking ancestors (well, they spoke German when they got to the States), but they were from Bohemia…Krasny Lez I believe is the place. What's the chance that they were also of Czech descent, but learned German because of their proximity to German peoples?

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