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  • #342476

    Anonymous

    How Europe's Borders Were Opened

    Passport, border and customs checks are foreign concepts for most young people in western Europe. For a decade now, borderless travel through 12 EU states has been a reality, thanks to the Schengen Agreement.

    It finally happened on March 26, 1995. "We've now succeeded in completely doing away with borders," proclaimed former Dutch Defense Minister Wim van Eekelen. Ten years ago, in the tiny Luxembourgian border town of Schengen, the treaty signed by France, Germany and the Benelux countries came into effect, making borderless travel possible.

    Since then, thousands of tourists have made a point of visiting the tiny village. There, they find a memorial, and now, a small info-center. Mayor Roger Weber is pleased that Schengen has achieved international recognition because of its association with travel freedom.

    "Sure, we're proud that the agreement was signed in Schengen," he beams. "It was actually more of a coincidence, but we're happy that it happened here."

    Back then, officials were on the lookout for a border crossing for the five founding states: Germany, France, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg. Since Luxembourg was holding the rotating EU Council presidency at the time, the choice fell on the tiny village on the Mosel river. The introduction of total freedom of travel was an experiment, beyond the actual agreements of the European Union.

    At the core of the EU identity
    Now, Schengen belongs to the core of the European identity. Twelve of the 25 EU states have signed the agreement. Hardly any EU citizens have to show their papers at the EU's borders these days. Only the British and Irish have to prove their identities upon crossing over to continental Europe as, due to their island status, they didn't join the Schengen Agreement.

    On the other hand, Norway and Iceland — both not members of the EU — have joined the Schengen club. Switzerland too, recently decided to join. The newest member states in eastern Europe are also meant to soon add their signatures. In return, the EU Commission has promised its support in building up security on the EU's new external borders. (…)

    http://www.dw-world.de/dw/article/0,1564,1531214,00.html

    I just saw this pic while reading about German Jacobins.
    [IMG]http://img188.imageshack.us/img188/3315/freiheitsbaum.jpg”/>

    It is the so-called "liberty tree" located in the Moselle area at the border between France and Luxembourg, with the small Luxembourgian town of Schengen in the background. This painting has been painted by J.W. von Goethe in 1792, the inscription says "Passans, cette terre est libre" which means "Passerbys, this land is free". This explains why the "Schengen treaty" which allows unchecked travel was signed in the relatively unknown town of Schengen.

    Is there a Jacobin influence in Slavic countries?

    #369086

    Anonymous

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_Jacobin

    There was an actual copy in Poland.

    #369087

    Anonymous

    So-called Hungarian Jacobins influenced by the French revolution founded their crypto-society in the ex-Kingdom of Hungary (the Slovaks, Ruthenians, Croats, Serbs were the stable part of the Kingdom). Its leader was a Serb Ignác Martinovics.

    #369088

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    So-called Hungarian Jacobins influenced by the French revolution founded their crypto-society in the ex-Kingdom of Hungary (the Slovaks, Ruthenians, Croats, Serbs were the stable part of the Kingdom). Its leader was a Serb Ignác Martinovics.

    I read that his Martinovic familiy originate from Serbia ("Martinovics belonged to a Serbian family who had fled from Serbia in the 17th century"), but, as catholic priest, Ignjat Martinović is considered to be Croat.
    Even though under the influence of the French Revolution, think that his ideas were noble, and in favor of the peoples of Hungary.

    #369089

    Anonymous
    Quote:

    Quote:
    So-called Hungarian Jacobins influenced by the French revolution founded their crypto-society in the ex-Kingdom of Hungary (the Slovaks, Ruthenians, Croats, Serbs were the stable part of the Kingdom). Its leader was a Serb Ignác Martinovics.

    I read that his Martinovic familiy originate from Serbia ("Martinovics belonged to a Serbian family who had fled from Serbia in the 17th century"), but, as catholic priest, Ignjat Martinović is considered to be Croat.
    Even though under the influence of the French Revolution, think that his ideas were noble, and in favor of the peoples of Hungary.

    Thank you for the info.

    #369090

    Anonymous

    As far as I know there never was a Jacobin-like movement in Ukraine.

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