• This topic has 12 replies, 8 voices, and was last updated 7 years ago by  Anonymous.
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  • #343835

    Anonymous
    #392651

    Anonymous

    Most of these surnames have some meanings in Slavic languages. I would say 90% of these surnames are Slavic. Katzer and Hotzwig aren't Slavic surnames. About Elias i am not sure.

    #392652

    Anonymous

    Many of them sound Polish as Dobras, Pytlik, Struzina, Nowak, Mazur, Joszko, Krol, Zyla, Mikolas, Ochota, Gombka, Plotnik, Golombek, Kurowski, Twardowski, Warzecha, Kunik, Kozlik, Lempa.

    #392653

    Anonymous

    Surnames don't really mean anything.
    My great grandfather had a Polish father and German mother.
    In WW1 he was in the Prussian army then when the war finished and Gniezno becaome apart of the second Polish republic he went into the Polish army. Then at the start of WW2 he was a lieutenant in the Wehrmacht.

    My great grandfather married a Polish lady ( my great grandmother) and they had my grandfather who was techniacly 3/4 Polish and 1/4 German by blood. My grandfather during WW2 was in the hitler youth and considered a Polish national of German origin ( a Volksdeutsche ) by the Germans.
    I have all the original nazi documentation.

    So was he German or Polish ?

    My point is surnames just indicate who your fathers fathers line was but that doesnt necessarily  reflect the person who bares that surname. remember people can change their names too.
    In the end its how you dentify yourself.

    #392654

    Anonymous

    From the linguistic point of view most of the surnames are Slavic, i. e. Polish.

    A word Biestrzynnik itself (Biestrzinick in 1679) is of Slavic origin. Biestrzy -> bystrzy means rapid, quick in the sense of a rapid stream, river, brook. There are hundreds of places with such a name.

    #392655

    Anonymous

    Today's Germany also was originally once predominantly Slavic lands and ethnic Germans have, they say, about 40-60% minimum of Slavic blood because of this.  It's quite understand to see so many Slavic based surnames no matter what spelling form they currently have.

    #392656

    Anonymous

    There are many Germanised Slavic names and also Slavicised German names.
    This is due to the fact that we don`t live in closed societies and throughout
    history there has been a lot of exchange and intermingeling.

    #392657

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    There are many Germanised Slavic names and also Slavicised German names.
    This is due to the fact that we don`t live in closed societies and throughout
    history there has been a lot of exchange and intermingeling.

    That's true, neverthless I was pointing at the linguistic aspect.

    #392660

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Biestrzy -> bystrzy means rapid, quick in the sense of a rapid stream, river, brook. There are hundreds of places with such a name.

    Now this info. makes whole naming complicating. I always imagined that brooks and rivers with name Bistrica indicate clear water. This is becouse here bistrina means clearness and bistrica clear brook, river, etc. Rivers and brooks with name Bistrica are widespread here. In fact major river in my area is Bistrica too. Also if you say ti si bister this means you are smart, wise. :D

    #392662

    Anonymous

    Lipp and Kroll are also originally German last names. But as was said before, surnames don't always prove to be reliable in establishing one's ancestry. Some of them might be as young as 200 years, then there's the problem of Polonization/Germanization which happened often there.

    Still don't get what OP was trying to prove with this…

    #392663

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Lipp and Kroll are also originally German last names.

    What dose Lipp and Kroll mean in German? I speculated for Kroll that it is from polish Król. While for Lipp i had theory that maybe it is from Lipa (linden). That is just my guessing however.

    #392664

    Anonymous

    I cancel Lipp. Maybe it realy isn't Slavic but i still think Kroll is just Germanised polish word Król.

    #392665

    Anonymous

    As you have rightly corrected yourself, Lipp isn't even remotely connected to anything Slavic.

    As for Kroll, it is mittelhochdeutsch, meaning "hair curl". There might be a Polish etymology, I don't know, but I think the first one is completely German.

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