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  • #344697

    Anonymous

    I am at the stage of discovering all 64 of my ancestors (6th generation) born around mid 19th century.

    #428418

    Anonymous

    I know mostly about great grandparents from my mother’s side. I’m interested most in one – great grandfather, who I know fought with Soviets in 1920. I just asked my mother a question if he also fought in Polish-Ukrainian War, but probably there is no possibility to know.

    I may know about previous generation, however only names, generally. So I don’t know much.

    #434765

    Anonymous

    Archives hold a lot of information. When I say a lot I mean plenty of it. There are people who know well how to search for that information. You pay them some money and they will check archives sending you scans.

    #428419

    Anonymous

    I have relatives from different social classes. Mostly they were peasants. Some were small schlachta. Some were military officiers and merchants. One of my ancestor fought in Russo-Turkish war of 1877-1888 stationed in what’s present day Bulgaria.

    #428420

    Anonymous

    I am not eager to spend money on that. But maybe one day, who knows. In Poland, probably, it costs at least 2x more than it should cost. Such a lovely European country.

    PS. Having an ancestry in “szlachta” should not be surprising.

    #428421

    Anonymous

    My goal is to find all 10th generation ancestors if I am lucky. That’d be 1024 people. But I don’t think it’s feasible unless I spend lifetime searching for them. I may have to do genetic genealogical tests such as Y-STR for different branches of my families if I hit a wall. This will cost me a fortune. Y-STR tests are different to that of SNP genetic tests conducted by 23andme and the likes. FDTDNA’s Y-STR tests are designed for people who are interested in genetic genealogy, whereas 23andme tests are designed for people interested in medical genetics and very distant relatives at population level.

    #428422

    Anonymous

    I know my ancestors mostly by male line some 4-5 generations back. My goal is to find out where does my family originate from in Slovakia. I know most likely who came from there and where in Slovakia my surname is most common. I just need time. Church books are probably the best source, every wedding and childbirth (baptism) is recorded there, of course if your family is Christian, which is the case with most of Slavs.

    #428423

    Anonymous

    10th generation is which period? 1500 year?

    #428424

    Anonymous

    a generation is 25 years on average. So, 250 years ago.

    #428425

    Anonymous

    Church books are probably the best source, every wedding and childbirth (baptism) is recorded there, of course if your family is Christian, which is the case with most of Slavs.
    —-
    Church books are quite reliable for births, deaths and marriages. But they are not the only sources of information. I am speaking for territories of the former Russian Empire.

    #428426

    Anonymous

    1765. :)

    Yes, I think many people use church books to do this.

    #428430

    Anonymous

    Up to Grandparents Grandparents and one Great Great Great Grandfather who was famous in the village because people often mistook him for a Turk and is who we get the Turkish family name from.

    #428444

    Anonymous

    @GaiusCoriolanus

    I am not eager to spend money on that. But maybe one day, who knows. In Poland, probably, it costs at least 2x more than it should cost. Such a lovely European country.

    It gets expensive in Belarus too. But you can search for the information yourself. Find a large genealogical forum in your country and ask forum members questions. For example, you know the names, dates of birth and places of birth of your great grandparents. If you don’t then ask your grandparents. They should know the names of their parents and places of their births unless they were orphans. If you can’t find that information from your relatives, then go to a forum and ask something like I am looking for church books that hold information about your grandparents that lived in a particular place at a particular time. Someone will point you to the right archive. Go to that archive or contact archive which may make a photocopy for a small fee. The entry in church books for your ancestors will have the names of their parents and godparents during baptism. Church books also hold information about marriages that include the names of groom’s and bride’s parents, their ages at wedding , as well as witnesses at the wedding. Church books also hold information about deceased and the age of deceased. If you are from eastern Poland that was part of Russian empire since 1795 you may have documents called ‘revizskie skazki’ in archives. These documents contain the names of family members and their relations to the bread winner of the family for each households. These documents were recorded for taxation purposes in Russian empire till 1850s.

    What I find difficult is to read some scribbled texts in old style languages. It’s always better to take a photocopy so you can magnify the image on computer or ask other people to help to understand the text. What’s worse a lot of government documents in Belarus were recorded in Polish in the past. Polish is already bad enough to read if the text is typed on a computer. Trying to read 170 year old hand written text in Polish is quite a task.

    #428448

    Anonymous

    I’ll maybe use such forums. About date of births and deaths is easy, I can just visit a graveyard. However, a case of my great grandfather of mother’s side is more problematic, as he arrived here with his mother – no one knows from where. His mother wasn’t talking about it, and he was to young to even know, he was a baby.

    PS. This area was Austrian Empire. Russian since 1815.

    #428449

    Anonymous

    Graveyards don’t last for a long time. Once you start searching for relatives who were born in pre-1850s you won’t find their graveyards.

    There are always occasions when it’s difficult to find a relative. I spent a lot of money and time searching for relatives from one branch of my family. I hit a brick wall searching for them .The clue came from an unexpected source. Russians (NKVD/KGB) revealed their archives about sentenced political prisoners. One of my relative was on the list whose full name and region of ancestry was revealed.

    PS One good thing about Orthodox tradition is that a full name of Orthodox person always includes the name of his or her father.

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