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  • #347184

    Anonymous

    Ahoj all!  I am a new member from the United States and recently discovered that my family name is of slavic origin.  Most notably… Slovak origin! 

    Just curious how many other members are Slovak or have Slovak heritage like myself. I really would love to learn more about the Slovak culture other than what Wikipedia says.

    #372380

    Anonymous

    Greetings, bro! I’m not a Slovak but am Slovakia’s neighbour and have seen Slovakia from the other side of the border. :D

    #408605

    Anonymous

    Ahoj! 🙂 

    I am a Slovak as well, but, I am, just like you, living in another country.
    I live in Serbia – however… although being here since the 18th century, Slovaks here have preserved their language and culture.

    There is more than 52.000 Slovaks living in the present territory of Serbia – out of which, the most is located in the North Serbia (aka. Vojvodina – around 50.000), while around 2000 live in other areas.

    In Serbia, there are also cities and villages with absolute Slovak majority. There are schools in Slovak language, TV Stations, etc. Most Slovaks here speak Slovak language at home.

    If you wish to learn the Slovak language, and need help with it, I can be at your disposal :smiley: 

    #408609

    Anonymous

    @Slov86

    I don’t know much about Slovak geneaology.

    First, you need to collect as much information as possible about your Slovak ancestors. Where they lived? When they lived? What was their religions. Approximate births of dates. When they left the country. What they did. Every bit of information counts.

    Then you need to find archives that may hold information about your relatives. Archives could be spread in several cities , even 2-3 countries.

    Once you find the archive, then you will not search for someone or agency who will go into archives searching for information. Usually, it cost money to search in archives. There maybe some regulations on how archive information is retrieved.

    #408602

    Anonymous

    My great grandfather was born in 1885 in Velka Trna, Slovakia. The village was called Nagytoronya,  Austria-Hungary. His baptismal record is written in Hungarian and indicates the family is Greek Catholic. My surname is Americanized. It used to be Pilisi. I’m not sure what Pilisi means or where it originated. 

    #408603

    Anonymous

    @Slov86

    If your ancestor was Greek Catholic (Uniate), he ‘s very likely to be a Rusyn (Ukrainian) living in eastern Slovakia. Lots of Rusyns left western Ukraine and eastern Slovakia in late 19th early 20th centuries for northern America.

    #408588

    Anonymous

    @Sviatogor Rusyn isn’t Ukranian, Rusyns I know in Serbia identify as Rusyns, not Ukranians. Rusyns in Slovakia I heard of rather identify as Slovaks than Ukranians. They will state that they have ties with Ukraine, they do use Zakarpatie Oblast’s coat of arms as national symbol, but they’re Rusyn. I’m saying all of this, because Rusyns lived throughout what was Hugary since mid 18th century, so you can’t be sure they migrated from south-eastern Ukraine anytime recent (19th-20th century being recent). All in all you’re right, if he’s Greek Catholic he’s most likely Rusyn. Of course, Ukrainians wouldn’t agree with anything I just wrote.

    #408589

    Anonymous

    I don’t know know about being Rusyn. According to American census records his “mother tongue” was Slovak and depending on the year was born in Austria-Hungary or Czechoslovakia. I do know that his mother’s name was Anna Kolezsar Estók.

    I read that there is town in Hungary called Pilis and many Slovaks live there. So I wonder if an ancestor lived there and moved and picked up the surname Pilisi. Or perhaps they moved from a town called Ples in Slovakia. As it used to be spelled Pilis also back in the 1800s. So for now I am stuck on the origin of Pilisi surname. 

    #408590

    Anonymous

    I must mention that I have made contact with very distant relatives still living in the town Velka Trna,  Slovakia. All that I could understand with the help of Google translation is that the Pilisi family has always been Slovak. But still no known whereabouts of the origin of the surname. 

    #408591

    Anonymous

    @Dušan

    All western Ukrainians and Ukrainians by and large identified themselves as Rusyns in the past. Modern day Rusyns and Rusyns of Slovakia and Voevodina are the remaining people.

    If Slov86, has Uniate (Greek Catholic) relatives, he’s definitely related to Rusyns of western Ukraine or western Ukrainians.

    #408592

    Anonymous

    @Slov86

    I would not trust censuses of America. Americans knew little about eastern Europeans.

    If your ancestors were Greek Catholic from Austro-Hungarian empire, then your ancestors were

    Rusyns (eastern Slavs)
    Western Ukrainians (eastern Slavs)
    Eastern Slovak , who are Rusyns (eastern Slavs)

    In modern day all these people are identified as western Ukrainians.

    #408593

    Anonymous

    All of this is very fascinating!
    Question…if the majority of Greek Catholics were Rusyns then what were the Slovaks considered to be?

    #408581

    Anonymous

    @Slov86

    Slovaks were Roman Catholic. I am not sure about their ethnic identity in the past. They were known as Hungarians abroad.

    #408582

    Anonymous

    @Dušan

    Ukrainian is a new ethnic term. In the past all western Ukrainians identified themselves Rusyns. Some kept old ethnonym Rusyn. Particularly those who migrated to Serbia, USA prior to 1915. Some kept it in western Ukraine and Slovakia.

    #408571

    Anonymous

    @Sviatogor I was just about to write something similar to your last comment, but I wouldn’t say all western Ukranians. I met around 40-50 people from Zakarpatie, I think only 3 or 4 said they were Rusyns, not saying they weren’t Ukrainians. Language of our Rusyns is much closer to Slovak than to Ukrainian, I can fully understand them and I rarely notice eastern Slavic characteristics in their language, except Cyrillic alphabet, of course.
    @Slov86 depends on the time period. At one point Slovaks were vastly Lutherans, but Habsburgs found a  way to convince them otherwise. For example they were allowed only one church per something like a county and it had to be made out of wood, without any nails within one year. In the time your ancestor migrated I think majority was Catholic. Now Slovakia is over 90% Catholic, but Slovaks in Serbia are mostly protestants for example.

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