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  • #344699

    Anonymous
    [table]
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    [td]image[/td][/tr]
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    Centum–satem compared to other general isoglosses in Indo-European daughter languages at about 500 BC.

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    Blue: Centum languages

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    Red: Satem languages

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    Orange: Languages exhibiting augment

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    Green: Languages exhibiting PIE *-tt- > -ss-

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    Tan: Languages exhibiting PIE *-tt- > -st-

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    Pink: Languages in which the instrumental, dative, and ablative plurals, as well as certain singulars and duals, exhibit endings beginning in -m-, rather than the usual *-bh-.

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    [/table]

    An isogloss—also called a heterogloss (see Etymology below)—is the geographical boundary of a certain linguistic feature, such as the pronunciation of a vowel, the meaning of a word, or use of some syntactic feature. Major dialects are typically demarcated by groups of isoglosses. Here is example found among Indo-European languages and language families. This is interesting for us, since it shows with which languages Slavic family could be grouped.

    #402605

    Anonymous

    This map does not seem to indicate that Balto-Slavic languages are not fully Satem.

    #402606

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    This map does not seem to indicate that Balto-Slavic languages are not fully Satem.

    I think this is pretty rough. French language is also partualy Satem. I think they suscribe to theory about Satemization as process, and that Centum languages are not geneticaly related, but just preserved older situatuion.

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