• This topic has 12 voices and 41 replies.
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 42 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #346144

    Anonymous

    image

    World heavyweight champion Vitali Klitschko put his boxing career on hold last month and turned into a politician.
    Despite leaving the tense fight in the ring, the Ukrainian’s life is far from settled.
    As a leader of the Ukrainian opposition party, United Democratic Alliance for Reform (UDAR), Klitschko continues to challenge Ukraine’s current president Viktor Yanukovich and plans to stand against him at the next presidential election in February 2015.
    Klitschko has never been knocked out in a professional boxing match – his political party’s acronym means ‘punch’ in Ukrainian – and has been at the forefront Ukraine’s biggest protests since the 2004 Orange Revolution.
    “I love Kiev, I love Ukraine, it’s my home and I feel comfortable here,” Klitschko told Al Jazeera.
    “Although I can afford to lead a comfortable life, I am surrounded by unfortunate and poor people. Ukraine is way behind in standard of living.
    Klitschko has vowed a fight against corruption and unfair treatment in Ukraine, labeling Europe ‘a good example’ for his people given the state of ‘democracy, human rights and the economy’ in the continent.
    “We are now faced with a decision of whether to change Ukraine or be destroyed.”
    Leading polls
    Klitschko is extremely popular in Ukraine: according to a recent poll involving 32,000 people, the boxer has the backing of 43% of those with only 25% going for Yanukovich.
    His success, or lack of, next year will also have huge consequences on his boxing career. Fans are certain that if he succeeds outside the ring, Klitschko will never step inside it again.
    His first boxing coach, Mikhail Mazikh, is sure that the champion will don the gloves whatever the election outcome is.
      [table]  [tr] [td] He’s a decent man who deserves to be the president of Ukraine
    Mikhail Mazikh,  Klitschko's first boxing coach
    [/td] [/tr]  [/table]  “He hasn’t retired and I’m sure we’ll see Klitschko fight again,” Mazikh said.
    “He’ll be back. Of course, he has other priorities right now but that doesn’t mean that he won’t return at to vie for the title.
    He’s been granted the right to challenge the new champion by the WBC when he decides to resume his boxing career.
    “He’s taking a break to concentrate on politics but he’ll return for at least for one more fight, I give you my word.”
    Klitschko has Mazikh’s backing outside the ring as well as the coach termed him a ‘very honest and fair person, unlike any other politicians in Ukraine’.
    “He didn’t cheat anybody, he’s gained his reputation and fortune through hard work and I think if he wins, the world will regard the people of Ukraine differently.
    “He’s a decent man who deserves to be the president of Ukraine.”
    Klitschko’s decision to hang up his gloves – for now – has received a lot of support in the boxing world.
    “Wish I could've fought Vitali Klitschko, admire and respect what he has done.. Congrats champ and good luck with politics my man. Bowe,” tweeted US boxer Rid**** Bowe, a former two-time world heavyweight champion.
    By turning his back on boxing, Klitschko vacated his title, a contender for which is Briton’s Dereck Chisora who lost to the Ukrainian on points in 2012.
    Chisora’s impressive show was overshadowed by his action at the weigh-in when he slapped Klitschko before spitting water in his brother’s face ahead of the fight.
    “Those incidents are a thing of the past and I can’t wish anything but luck to Klitschko with his new career now,” Chisora said.
    “He was a great opponent in the ring and I think he’s great for his people. I have huge respect for his decision and If I had the opportunity, I would definitely vote for him.”

    http://www.aljazeera.com/sport/boxing/2014/01/must-change-be-destroyed-2014181622198680.html

    #425582

    Anonymous

    One of the biggest disappointments of recent times… or a proof that a lot of people are buyable, only the price matters.

    #425583

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    One of the biggest disappointments of recent times… or a proof that a lot of people are buyable, only the price matters.

    The fact Ukrainians don't want to have ties with Russia or?

    #425584

    Anonymous

        Since when are boxers considered to be good politicians?!?!? I say take that idiot to the prison. First of all, what he is doing, if I were Ukrainian government, I would consider as an insult. Secondly, f**k that government who cannot deal with a single mercenary.

    #425585

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    One of the biggest disappointments of recent times… or a proof that a lot of people are buyable, only the price matters.

    The only people bought are in the Ukrainian government, and they were bought by Putin.

    #425586

    Anonymous

    No doubt, he gonna be a strong figure in Ukrainian politics. ;D
    image

    #425587

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    The only people bought are in the Ukrainian government, and they were bought by Putin.

      I understand Poland has always had problems with Russia, but seriously, better Russia than EU. At least there won't be any globalization.

    #425588

    Anonymous
    Quote:
      I understand Poland has always had problems with Russia, but seriously, better Russia than EU. At least there won't be any globalization.

    It's pretty much the same thing , only from the East. Slavs should have good relations with each other but not dominate one and other.

    #425589

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    It's pretty much the same thing , only from the East. Slavs should have good relations with each other but not dominate one and other.

        Being dominated by the Russians isn't that bad because you are still dominated by the Slavic people, and your culture cannot be changed that much. As for Svatoslava, her "bias" is completely justifiable. :D
       

    #425590

    Anonymous
    Quote:
        Being dominated by the Russians isn't that bad because you are still dominated by the Slavic people, and your culture cannot be changed that much. As for Svatoslava, her "bias" is completely justifiable. :D

    Sadly, Russian government isn't much Slavic or pro Slavic. I'm against any globalization too.

    Svätoslava, поздравляю с новым аватаром. :)

    #425591

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Sadly, Russian government isn't much Slavic or pro Slavic.

      I know, but it doesn't matter at all, because they want to spread their influence. As long as Russian influence is not non-slavic, I'm good with it. :)

    #425592

    Anonymous
    Quote:
      I know, but it doesn't matter at all, because they want to spread their influence. As long as Russian influence is not non-slavic, I'm good with it. :)

    So you like to be exploited and controled by others, nice.

    #425593

    Anonymous
    Quote:

        Being dominated by the Russians isn't that bad because you are still dominated by the Slavic people, and your culture cannot be changed that much. As for Svatoslava, her "bias" is completely justifiable. :D
     

    Dear Senka, learn some history. :) This is a big part of why EuroMaidan is happening today…

    CHRONOLOGY OF
    PROHIBITIONS OF THE UKRAINIAN LANGUAGE

    Seventeenth century:

    1622:
    At the request of Patriarch Filaret of Moscow, Tsar Mikhail
    issues order to burn all copies of Kyrylo Stavrovetsky’s
    didactic gospels printed in Ukraine

    1690:
    The Council of the Russian Orthodox Church condemns and proclaims an
    anathema on the “new Kyivan books” of the churchmen Petro Mohyla, Kyrylo
    Stavrovetsky, Simeon Polotsky, Lazar Baranovych, A. Radzivilovsky, and others.

    1696:
    The PolishDiet approves the introduction of
    the Polish language in the courts and institutions of Right
    Bank Ukraine (west of the Dnipro River).

    Eighteenth century:

    1720
    Tsar Peter I of Russia issues a decree banning the publication of Ukrainian
    language books and ordering the confiscation of Ukrainian language church
    books.

    1729
    Tsar Peter ІІІ issues a decree
    ordering all state resolutions and directives to
    be transcribed from Ukrainian into Russian
    .
    1731
    Empress Anna Ivanovna of Russia orders the confiscation of books printed
    in Old Ukrainian and mandates that “learning be conducted in our own Russian
    language.”

    1734: In a secret instruction, Empress Anna Ivanovna of Russia orders
    Prince Aleksei Shakhovskoi, ruler of Ukraine to use all means to
    prevent Ukrainians from marrying Poles and Belarusians and “
    to awaken and lead them, in a clever manner, to a relationship with Great Russians.”

    1763
    Empress Catherine II of Russia issues a decreebanning the teaching of
    Ukrainian at Kyiv Mohyla Academy

    1769
    The Synod of the Russian Orthodox Church bans the printing and use of
    Ukrainian primers

    1775
    The Ukrainian Cossack stronghold, the Zaporozhian Sich, is destroyed and
    Ukrainian schools at regimental Cossack offices are closed.

    1789
    The Educational Committee of the Polish Diet issues a directive concerning
    the closure of Ukrainian schools.

    Nineteenth century:

    1817
    The Polish language is introduced in all public schools in Western Ukraine.

    1832:
    Education in Right-Bank Ukraine is reorganized along general imperial
    principles and Russian is introduced as the language of instruction.

    1847
    The members of the Cyril and Methodius Brotherhood are arrested, and
    Brutal Russian tsarist repressions against the Ukrainian language and culture,
    including a ban on the works of Taras Shevchenko, Panteleimon Kulish, Mykola
    Kostomarov, and others, are intensified.

    1859
    The Ministry of Religion and Sciences of Austro-Hungary in
    the Ukrainian provinces of Eastern Galicia and Bukovyna attempts to change the
    Ukrainian Cyrillic alphabet to the Latin script

    1862:
    Free Sunday Ukrainian schools for adults in Russian – ruled Ukraine are
    closed.

    1863
    The infamous Valuev Circular is issued, banning the publication of
    Ukrainian-language theological and popular educational literature. Petr Valuev,
    Minister of Internal Affairs, declares: “No separate Little Russian [i.e., Ukrainian] language has [ever] existed, does exist [now], and can [ever] exist…”

    1864
    A statute is passed on elementary schools, in which teaching must be
    conducted exclusively in the Russian language.
    1869

    The Polish language is introduced as the official language of education and
    administration in Ukrainian Eastern Galicia.

    1870
    Russia’s education minister, Count Dmitrii Tolstoy, explains that the
    “ultimate goal of educating non-Russians should be unquestionably their
    Russianization.”

    1876
    Tsar Alexander II issues the notorious Ems Ukase
    (Ems Decree) banning the printing of and importation from abroad of any kind of Ukrainian
    -language literature, and also prohibiting the staging of Ukrainian theatrical performances
    and the printing of Ukrainian texts to musical notes, i.e., folk songs

    1881
    The tsarist authorities ban the use of Ukrainian as the language of
    instruction in public schools and in church sermons

    1884
    Tsar Alexander IIІ bans the staging of Ukrainian theatrical performances in
    all “Little Russian” (Ukrainian) provinces

    1888
    Tsar Alexander IIІ issues a decree banning the use of the Ukrainian
    language in official institutions and the use of Ukrainian names during baptisms.

    1892
    The tsarist authorities ban the translation of books from Ru
    ssian into Ukrainian.

    1895
    The Main Administration of Publishing Affairs bans the publication of
    Ukrainian-language children’s books

    Twentieth century:

    1908
    Four years after the Russian Academy of Sciences recognizes Ukrainian as
    a language, the Russian Senate declares that Ukrainian-language cultural and
    educational activities are “harmful to the empire.”

    1910
    The government of Russian Prime Minister Petr Stolypin orders the closure
    of all Ukrainian cultural societies and publishing houses and bans public lectures
    in the Ukrainian language and the founding of non-Russian clubs.

    1911
    The VII All-Russian Congress of the Nobility in Moscow passes a
    resolution on exclusively Russian-language education and the inadmissibility of
    the use of any other languages in schools in the Russian Empire

    1914
    The tsarist authorities ban the celebration of the 100th anniversary of the
    birth of Ukraine’s national poet Taras Shevchenko; Tsar Nicholas II issues
    a decree abolishing the Ukrainian press

    1914, 1916
    Two major Russification campaigns in Western Ukraine;
    a ban on Ukrainian writing, education, and the Church.

    1922
    The leadership of the Central Committees of the Russian Communist Party
    (Bolshevik) and the Communist Party (Bolshevik) of Ukraine develops the
    “theory” of the struggle between two cultures in Ukraine—urban (Russian) and
    rural (Ukrainian) culture, in which the former should triumph.

    1924
    The Polish Republic passes a law restricting the use of the Ukrainian
    language in administrative bodies, courts, and education system in the Polish-
    ruled Ukrainian lands in Western Ukraine

    1924
    The Kingdom of Romania passes a law obliging all “Romanians” who have
    “lost their mother tongue” to educate their children exclusively in Romanian
    schools(This law refers to the Ukrainian minority living in Romanian ruled
    ethnic Ukrainian territories of Bukovyna and Bessarabia)

    1925
    The Ukrainian “secret” university in Lviv is closed.

    1926
    Stalin writes a letter to “Comrade Kaganovich and other members of the
    Politburo of the Central Committee of the Communist Party (Bolshevik) of
    Ukraine,” in which he sanctions a struggle against “national deviation.” This letter marks the beginning of the campaign to target distinguished Ukrainian figures active in the Ukrainization process.

    I'll stop here, but the list goes on and on…

    #425594

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Being dominated by the Russians isn't that bad because you are still dominated by the Slavic people, and your culture cannot be changed that much. (…)

    Ok, so abuse is wrong only if outside the family?

    You are really naive.

    #425595

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    So you like to be exploited and controled by others, nice.

        My dear Pentaz, smaller countries like Serbia, Croatia, and in comparison with Russia, even Ukraine, cannot really get to choose not to be controlled. They can only choose by whom they will be controlled.    Ukraine is mostly controlled by Russia, you are controlled by EU, and we are slowly going in that way, but I hope it will not happen.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 42 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Slavorum

9 User(s) Online Join Server
  • TypowaPolskaKobieta
  • jorgos
  • kony97
  • Fia
  • slovborg
  • Piachu