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  • #343878

    Anonymous

    Recently I encountered the sources mentioning various divines worshipped by the Poles, and are called Lechitic gods, gods of Poles, and so on. But they are not called Slavic gods, I am trying to figure out something.

    Jan Długosz wrote in 15th century one of the most famous Polish chronicles, originally called “Annales seu cronicae incliti Regni Poloniae”. He mentions various deities worshipped by the Poles and compares them to Roman gods. Jessa = Jupiter; Łada = Mars; Dzidzileyla = Venera; Nija = Pluto; Dziewanna = Diana; Marzanna = Cerera. He also described some ceremonies practised by the people. This work was based on a “Postil of Łukasz from Wielki Koźmin” (Postylla Łukasza z Wielkiego Koźmina) from 1405, where mentioned Łukasz says:

    “Non enim salvatur in hoc nomine Lado, Yassa, Quia, Nia sed in nomine Ihesus Christus […] Non Lada, non Yassa, non Nia, que suntnomina alias ydolorum in Polonia hic cultorum, ut quedam cronice testantur ipsorum Polonorum.”

    Which means more or less:

    “A man cannot acquire salvation through the name of Lado, Yassa, Quia, Nia, but only through the name of Jesus Christ. Not Lada, not Yassa, not Nia, which are names of deities cultivated here in Poland, as suggest even chronicles written by the Poles themselves.”

    What I wonder is – these are gods of Poles. But where are typically Slavic gods? I am curious about specific one: Nia. He is supposed to be a god of underworld, afterlife, like Veles is the boss in Navia (or however it can be called in English). Is it simply an equivalent? Same god, different name? Here’s a short description of him:


      
    He doesn’t remind me of Veles.

    #436093

    Anonymous

    I think it’s just polish version of Triglav (Triglav had a black horse and 3 heads)

    #436094

    Anonymous

    Slavic mythology is complicated cause every tribe had it’s version of it. I think it’s the same with polish gods, it’s slavic mythology with different names of deitis. 

    #436095

    Anonymous

    Good point, there are similarities between him and Triglav. But also differences (the tree, Rokita and Boruta). I have only assumptions right now that it may be an equivalent of another deity, as you say; or that few centuries after official “baptism” people made another pantheon; or that it was a local deity unknown in other parts of the country. But because these assumptions vary, I also have a headache.

    #436096

    Anonymous

    Slavic mythology is complicated cause every tribe had it’s version of it. I think it’s the same with polish gods, it’s slavic mythology with different names of deitis. 


    But gods such as Perun, Svarog and Veles were known here. So changing names was a bit pointless. Unless the time is the issue here. Perun and Veles could be known to people in 10th century, but became unknown 400 years later. 

    #436098

    Anonymous

    Could you provide me with some of the sources that mention these polish gods? I’d like to look into it a bit more.

    #436099

    Anonymous

    But gods such as Perun, Svarog and Veles were known here. So changing names was a bit pointless. Unless the time is the issue here. Perun and Veles could be known to people in 10th century, but became unknown 400 years later. 

    Christians, Jews and Muslims worship the same god as well and they call it differently, while also living in the same area at the same time. It could be the case. And since paganism back then didn’t have a strong structure as modern religions do, the descriptions of deities could have varied from region to region.

    #436100

    Anonymous

    @Lothiriel-Ithil here are some with translations: http://www.bogowiepolscy.net/galeria.html
    It’s a gallery, when you’ll click on image you’ll see a similar graphics to the one from first post. 

    Here are few more illustrations but in Polish only: http://weneda.net/bostwa-i-demony-w-dawnej-polsce-ilustracje/

    The knowledge about these gods (and other spirits) comes from Polish folklore and mentioned chronicles which I doubt if are available in English. 

    @”Kapitán Denis” then the concept of Slavic mythology doesn’t make sense, if it’s simply a bunch of various mythologies. Of course, some stuff differed, but come on… :) Different name and different description with different symbolism, is not a slight difference, but rather completely different deity.

    #436101

    Anonymous

    @”Kapitán Denis”

    Bingo. Hit the nail on the head.

    #440129

    Anonymous

    I am also curious about that.

    #440130

    Anonymous

    @terry9 unfortunately I haven’t found anything new. Possibly they were just named differently in the different regions. Or maybe it depended on the time period. Hard to say.

    #440141

    Anonymous

    GaiusCoriolanus  

    Looks like Triglav, but in regards to the Roman influence. Look at the Scandinavian or Germanic Wottanaz or Odin; there is no mention of him specifically in Norse chronicles the way Tyr or Ingui Freyr are mentioned; various sources leave us to believe that Odin is in fact the Roman equivalent of Mercury or Jupiter and that this was a Roman influence or a particular Roman Buddha who traveled and lived in Germania. So the idea of Roman influence in the North and as a result deities being created based on these ideas is nothing too out-worldy because in Indo-European Paganism gods and beliefs are flexible and philosophies from elsewhere are often taken next to the mythology.

    I believe Triglav is another version or the “Slavic” equivalent of the Germanic Wottanaz.

    #440142

    Anonymous

    @Volkhvy 

    Triglav was worshipped by the Polabians and in Pomerania. Veles (whom you have in the avatar, I see, nice) mainly in Rus, so Nyja’s cult could have been present among some other Polish tribes. But wouldn’t that mean there’s no “Slavic mythology” but “mythologies” instead?

    #440167

    Anonymous

    >Christians, Jews and Muslims worship the same god as well and they call it differently

    They most certainly do not. The confusion arises from the fact that they are all monotheistic, however, their concept of God differs.

    #440170

    Anonymous

    Indeed. They’re all derived from each other or from a common source, but that doesn’t make them quite the same gods (just like I’m not my father or my brother – we’re different people, even if close relatives). Not to mention that the Islamic Allah is more closely related to the original Jewish Yahweh, rather than to the Christian God.

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