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  • #346540

    Anonymous

    Do you know what Licidersko srce is? It is pretty popular souvenir in Serbia. I wonder does other slavic countries have it too?
    image

    #431860

    Anonymous

    It's a faint copy of original Licitarskog Srca :)

    #431861

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    It's a faint copy of original Licitarskog Srca :)

    Yea wikipedia lol. I can edit it and put it originated in my village.

    #431862

    Anonymous

    Hard gingerbread hearts, not ment to eat (though possible), making tradition differs from region to region. In Slovenia it's usual to make hearts, horses, horseshoes etc. Acording to Slovene tradition only the front side is painted red and decorated, while the back remains as gingerbread. In Croatia they paint both sides. It is called lectovo srce or lect here, some of the oldest workshops have a tradition since 1757, 1766 and so on. This one's obviously from Prekmurje ;D

    image

    Quote:
    Yea wikipedia lol. I can edit it and put it originated in my village.

    Lol, da fak

    #431863

    Anonymous

    Both Slovene and Serbo-Croatian Lect & Licitar steem from German. Thow Slovene language also has domestic true Slavic word for Lect; Strdenje, which comes from old Slovene word for honey; Strd. Becouse the craft usually uses honey and also other bee based products. Lect's with redish color, sugar and other additions as are known today were developed in 19th century while the whole artisanship of Lectarstvo has an old past.

    In medieval period they even had their own guilds. The tradition is primarly Catholic thing and German in origin. Where preciesly these heart shaped forms started i can't say but like i said it must be 19th century thing due to building material and color (red color, sugar, etc).

    #431864

    Anonymous

    I want one! :D Are these edible, like a cookie? I've often wondered what are the most popular souvenirs for tourists in various Slavic countries. Anyway, these biscuits/cookies are so adorable. :)

    #431865

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I want one! :D Are these edible, like a cookie? I've often wondered what are the most popular souvenirs for tourists in various Slavic countries. Anyway, these biscuits/cookies are so adorable. :)

    They can still be eaten a few days after they've been made (afterall, it's just some kind of gingerbread), but when the harden completely they're practically unedible.

    #431866

    Anonymous

    Licitarsko srce is a traditional Croatian souvenir.The bakers that make them are known as "licitari",and it is traditionally a part of the mead-makers repertoire.One of the best places to get them is the town of Marija Bistrica,which is the largest pilgrimage site devoted to the cult of Mary in Croatia.It is also the biggest surviving mead-making center in the country,well known for the traditional mead called "gvirc" (or gverc as some call it).
    They are usually not intended for human consumption,but as a decorative ornament,and in the times past were a popular gift from a guy to a girl whom he fancied.

    #431867

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    They can still be eaten a few days after they've been made (afterall, it's just some kind of gingerbread), but when the harden completely they're practically unedible.
    Quote:
    Licitarsko srce is a traditional Croatian souvenir.The bakers that make them are known as "licitari",and it is traditionally a part of the mead-makers repertoire.One of the best places to get them is the town of Marija Bistrica,which is the largest pilgrimage site devoted to the cult of Mary in Croatia.It is also the biggest surviving mead-making center in the country,well known for the traditional mead called "gvirc" (or gverc as some call it).
    They are usually not intended for human consumption,but as a decorative ornament,and in the times past were a popular gift from a guy to a girl whom he fancied.

    Thank you both for the additional information. :) I found an English site devoted to Licitar – Croat's Warm Heart that sells these and has procedures on making them. Fascinating history:

    The tradition of licitar making dates back to the Middle Ages, especially to the 16th and 17th century when cakes in richly decorated wooden moulds were made in many European convents. In the Easter Alps region, such tradition of cake making soon grew into a craft, which was gradually spreading to the other Central European regions, when it also came to the Pannonian parts of Croatia. In the 18th and 19th Century, in the towns of Zagreb, Karlovac, Koprivnica, Samobor, Varaždin and elsewhere, licitar makers were reputable craftsmen, and their products favorite among members of all social classes. Here, craftsmen were making dough and wax products such as licitars, gingerbread cakes, candles, wax votive gifts and drinks such as “gvirc” and mead. Since their early days, these products have been sold at fairs and parish fairs related to church festivals. Thanks to licitars producers, the stalls with gingerbread and mead products provided picturesqueness and special atmosphere.

    #431868

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Licitarsko srce is a traditional Croatian souvenir.The bakers that make them are known as "licitari",and it is traditionally a part of the mead-makers repertoire.One of the best places to get them is the town of Marija Bistrica,which is the largest pilgrimage site devoted to the cult of Mary in Croatia.It is also the biggest surviving mead-making center in the country,well known for the traditional mead called "gvirc" (or gverc as some call it).
    They are usually not intended for human consumption,but as a decorative ornament,and in the times past were a popular gift from a guy to a girl whom he fancied.

    Better to not argue about which Licidersko srce is lol. Lets say its Yugoslavian souvenir.

    #431869

    Anonymous

    it is widespread across europe.

    #431870

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    it is widespread across europe.

    How many different countries have this tradition? I think the ones posted here are all lovely… Serbian, Slovene, and Croatian. :)

    #431871

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    How many different countries have this tradition? I think the ones posted here are all lovely… Serbian, Slovene, and Croatian. :)

    Like is said its predominantly tradition of Catholic lands that were and are under German influence. Origin is in Franconia. They have this by the tons in Austria and south Germany. Since Habsburgs held huge sways of central and south-eastern Europe take a guess. It should be present in much of if not all of ex-AH empire and south Germany.

    #431872

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Like is said its predominantly tradition of Catholic lands that were and are under German influence. Origin is in Franconia. They have this by the tons in Austria and south Germany. Since Habsburgs held huge sways of central and south-eastern Europe take a guess. It should be present in much of if not all of ex-AH empire and south Germany.

    Thank you, Povhec, for the additional clarification. Hope I'm not appearing a bit too excited about gingerbread decorated hearts. ;D  Licidersko srce is something unique that I never knew of before. Seems gingerbread craft is popular in many European and Slavic lands. I know of Tula Gingerbread from Russia, for example.

    #431873

    Anonymous

    image
    Czech perníkové srdce

    image
    Austrian lebkuchen herz

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    German lebkuchen herz

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    Swiss lebkuchen herz

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    Slovakian perníkové srdce

    [img width=700 height=700]http://www.dekos.bz/images/product_images/popup_images/1_1.jpg” />
    Italian cuore di zenzero

    image
    French ceour en pain d'épice

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    Polish serce z piernika

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    Slovene lectovo srce

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    Croatian licitarsko srce

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    Serbian and montenegrin licidersko srce

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    Hungarian mézeskalács szív

    [img width=700 height=525]http://cs1.livemaster.ru/foto/large/40f5305385-podarki-k-prazdnikam-pryaniki-serdtse.jpg” />
    ans specially for Karpivna, Ukrainian пряники серце/pryanyky sertse

    There may be such hearts from other countries aswell, I bothered finding only these …

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