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  • #382196

    Anonymous

    Jan Welzl
     (15 August 1868, Zábřeh, Moravia – 19 September 1948 Dawson, Canada) was a Moravian traveller, adventurer, hunter, gold-digger, Eskimo chief and Chief Justice in New Siberia and later story-teller and writer. He is known under the pseudonym Eskymo Welzl or the nickname Arctic Bismarck.

    He was working on the transsiberia railroad in Irkutsk in 1893. When the job was over, he decided to try his luck in the North. He purchased a horse and a two wheel cart and started walking without maps with just a description how and where to go. He eventually made it in three years or so going through cities: Krasnojarsk, Vitimsk, Olekminsk, Yakutsk Verchoyansk and Kolymsk. 

    For the end of the journey he traded the horse in for 4 caribous and sled and after initial trip to the arctic sea – whale hunt with russian ship – settled at New Siberian Islands. These islands were his home address for next 30 years, he made his living as locksmith, hunter, fisherman, peddler, postman and eventually local chief of the settlement of 50 or so white settlers and tribes of Inuits.

    As a peddler he would travel to Nome to shop for food and necessary supplies for himself and his friends and deliver the merchandise all over the area on ship or on sled. With his friends he travelled several times to Mackenzie river to trap fur animals and trade pelts and such. He also participated in 13 trips to the arctic sea and got as high as 85,53. 

    One of his business trips was also delivering steam engines for miners from New Siberia Islands to the area of Iditarod – by expedition of sleds.

    Nobody would know anything about him, but his ship wrecked near Seattle in summer 1924 and since he was de facto citizen of Czechoslovakia they sent him to Europe.

    Here he struggled to make some money and eventually put together a book with help of Rudolf Těsnohlídek. Pavel Eisner continued this but did not finish and later Bedřich Golombek and Edvard Valenta completed the work. The book "Třicet let na zlatém severu" (literally "Thirty Years in the Golden North") had great success in Czechoslovakia and also abroad, where people suspected that "Eskymo Welzl" did not exist and that the real author was Karel Čapek who wrote the preface to foreign editions.

    With the money from the book he was able to return to Alaska. He return too late, there was no connection that way between USA and the Siberian Islands anymore and he died in Dawson city 1951.

    #382197

    Anonymous

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    [td]Vera (Popović) Šnajder

    Vera Šnajder was born on the 2nd of February 1904 in the town of Reljevo, near Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Reljevo was a home of an Orthodox Christian Seminary which was directed by Vera’s father. She died on the 14th of February 1976 in Sarajevo. Vera completed her elementary education, followed by high school (“Classical Gymnasium”) in Sarajevo, graduating in 1922, and then enrolled at the University of Belgrade, Faculty of Philosophy, division of theoretical and applied mathematics and experimental physics. Because of interruptions due to illness, she graduated in 1928. From then until 1929 she was a professor of Women’s Gymnasium in Sarajevo when, as one of the best students and young mathematicians of her generation, she earned a fellowship that enabled her to go to Paris for further study.[/td]
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    [td][img height=186]http://www.bh-leksikon.ba/foto/big/BH_LEKSIKON_0000656_20120517023732.jpg”/>[/td]
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    [td]Mahmut Bajraktarević

    Mahmut Bajraktarević (1909, in Sarajevo – 1985, in Bugojno) was a Bosnian mathematician and academician. He graduated from the University of Belgrade in 1933 and received his doctorate from the Sorbonne in 1953 with the dissertation Sur certaines suites itérées. Bajraktarević was a professor at the University of Sarajevo and had a great influence on the development of mathematics in Bosnia and Herzegovina. He contributed to the research areas of functional equations, iterative sequences and summability theory.[/td][/tr]
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    #382198

    Anonymous

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    [td][img height=200]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/8b/MilutinMilankovic.PNG/220px-MilutinMilankovic.PNG”/>[/td]
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    [td]Milutin Milanković

    Milutin Milanković (Serbian: Милутин Миланковић, pronounced [milǔtin milǎːnkɔʋitɕ]; 28 May 1879 – 12 December 1958) was a Serbian mathematician, astronomer, geophysicist, climatologist, civil engineer, doctor of technology, university professor, and writer. Milanković gave two fundamental contributions to global science. The first contribution is the "Canon of the Earth’s Insolation", which characterizes the climates of all the planets of the Solar system. The second contribution is the explanation of Earth's long-term climate changes caused by changes in the position of the Earth in comparison to the Sun, now known as Milankovitch cycles. This explained the ice ages occurring in the geological past of the Earth, as well as the climate changes on the Earth which can be expected in the future. He founded cosmic climatology by calculating temperatures of the upper layers of the Earth's atmosphere as well as the temperature conditions on planets of the inner Solar system, Mercury, Venus, Mars, and the Moon, as well as the depth of the atmosphere of the outer planets. He demonstrated the interrelatedness of celestial mechanics and the Earth sciences, and enabled consistent transition from celestial mechanics to the Earth sciences and transformation of descriptive sciences into exact ones.

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    For all you that were to lazy to read the text, the guy found out, amongst others, the formula for calculating past and future ice-ages. :)

    At NASA, in their edition of "On the Shoulders of Giants", Milanković has been ranked among the top fifteen minds of all time in the field of earth sciences.

    #382199

    Anonymous

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    [td][img height=150]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f9/Jakub_Bart-%C4%86i%C5%A1inski.jpg/424px-Jakub_Bart-%C4%86i%C5%A1inski.jpg”/>[/td]
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    [td]Jakub Bart-Ćišinski

    Jakub Bart-Ćišinski (20 August 1856 in Kuckau – 16 October 1909 in Panschwitz), also known as Łužičan, Jakub Bart Kukowski, was Sorbian poet, writer and playwrighter, translator of Czech, Polish, Italian and German literature. He produced his works in Upper Sorbian. He is also an inventor of modern Upper Sorbian poetic language.[/td]
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    [td]Korla Awgust Kocor

    Korla Awgust Kocor (3 December 1822 – 19 May 1904; German: Karl August Katzer) was a Sorbian composer and conductor.Kocor was born in Großpostwitz. He was the composer of the music of the Lusatian national anthem Rjana Łužica. He has been called the "founding father of secular Sorbian music."[/td]
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    [td]Handrij Zejler

    Handrij Zejler (1 February 1804 – 15 October 1872) was a Sorbian writer, pastor and national activist. He co-founded the Lusatian cultural and scientific societyMaćica Serbska. Zejler was born on February 1, 1804 in Słona Boršć (German: Salzenforst), now a part of Budyšin (Bautzen). He was an author of popular religious, love and patriotic poems, as well as the Sorbian national anthem Rjana Łužica, linguistic works, publicist works, ballads, satires, fables. He died on October 15, 1872 in Łaz (Lohsa) near Wojerecy (Hoyerswerda). Zejler is seen today as one of the founders of Sorbian national literature.[/td]
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    #382200

    Anonymous

    There were many famous and well-known people lived in Russia in that period. A list of
    inventors, engineers, scientists, scholars, artists, performing artists, sportspeople and others:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_famous_Russians
     

    #382201

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    There were many famous and well-known people lived in Russia in that period. A list of
    inventors, engineers, scientists, scholars, artists, performing artists, sportspeople and others:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_famous_Russians

    An here's and interesting person who's on that list:

    image Konstantin Pavlovich Buteyko (Russian: Константи́н Па́влович Буте́йко; January 23, 1923 – May 2, 2003) was the creator of the Buteyko method for the treatment of asthma and other breathing disorders.

    Konstantin Pavlovich Buteyko was born on 27 January 1923 into a farming family inIvanitsa, near Kiev, Ukraine. His father was a keen mechanic and he followed this passion, studying mechanical engineering at Kiev Polytechnic. World War II interrupted this study however and he was sent to join a motorcade supplying the front lines. During the war, Buteyko grew tired of mechanics and decided to go into medicine.

    "When the War ended, I decided to start researching the most complex machine, the Man. I thought if I learnt him, I’d be able to diagnose his diseases as easily as I had diagnosed machine disorders." -Professor Buteyko, Interview in 1982

    In 1946 Buteyko enrolled at the First Moscow Institute of Medicine. He gained his degree with Honors in 1952 and became a resident. During his medical studies he was given a project of making observations on patients’ breathing rates in relation to the severity and prognosis of their illness. He soon came to the conclusion that there was an association between these two factors, such that as a patient’s condition became more severe so their breathing rate increased.

    Buteyko reasoned that if there really was a connection between hyperventilation and illness it should be possible to reverse this by deliberate breath control. Having already made a study of several texts on yoga he was aware of exercises in breath restriction and so began to experiment both on himself and with his patients. These early trials became known as the Buteyko method.

    The Buteyko method is based on the concept that undiagnosed hyperventilation is the underlying cause of numerous medical conditions, including asthma. It is known that hyperventilation can lead to low carbon dioxide levels in the blood (or hypocapnea), which can subsequently lead to disturbances of the acid-base balance in the blood and lower tissue oxygen levels.

    By the early 1980s the Russian authorities were sufficiently impressed with Buteyko’s results to allow him a formal trial, or ‘approbation’ with asthmatic children in a Moscow hospital. Although very different in design from the standard controlled trial now predominant in the west, the results were sufficiently impressive to persuade the State Medical System to approve the method for widespread use.

    In the late 1980s an Australian businessman was admitted to hospital in Russia for treatment of an attack of angina. He was introduced to the Buteyko method (known in Russia as ‘Voluntary Elimination of Deep Breathing’ or VEDB) and found it extremely helpful. The Australian sponsored two Russian practitioners to teach the techniques in Australia. Within a short time, one of these people, Alexander Stalmatski was also training new teachers. The first blinded, controlled trial of Buteyko was carried out in 1994. Since then the Buteyko method has spread to numerous countries around the world with multiple organizations started to teach the method.

    Although variations exist among teachers of the technique in different countries, the main objective is "normalization" of breathing and the three core principles of Buteyko remain the same: nasal breathing, reduced breathing and relaxation.

    Professor Buteyko died in Moscow, Russia on May 2, 2003, aged 80.

    #382202

    Anonymous

    Mihajlo Idvorski Pupin Mihajlo Idvorski Pupin, Ph.D, LL.D. (9 October 1858 – 12 March 1935; Serbian Cyrillic: Михајло Идворски Пупин), also known as Michael I. Pupin, was a Serbian-American physicist and physical chemist. Pupin is best known for his numerous patents, including a means of greatly extending the range of long-distance telephone communication by placing loading coils (of wire) at predetermined intervals along the transmitting wire (known as “pupinization”). 

      Mihajlo Pupin was a founding member of National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) on March 3, 1915, which later became NASA.

    First Meeting

    The first meeting of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) in the Office of The Secretary Of War on April 23, 1915. Seated from left to right: William Durand, Stanford University, Calif.; S.W. Stratton, director, Bureau of Standards; Brig. Gen. George P. Scriven, chief signal officer, War Dept.; C.F. Marvin, chief, United States Weather Bureau; <strong>Michael I. Pupin</strong>, Columbia University, N.Y. Standing: Holden C. Richardson, naval instructor; John F. Hayford, Northwestern University, Ill.; Capt. Mark L. Bristol, director of Naval Aeronautics; Lt. Col. Samuel Reber, Signal Corps. Charge, Aviation Section. Also present at the First Meeting: Joseph S. Ames, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md.; Hon. B. R. Newton, Asst. Secretary of Treasury. 

    #382203

    Anonymous

    Three Slavs were key figures in television invention: Paul Nipkow, Constantin Perskyi and Vladimir Zworykin

    Paul Nipkow of Kashubian decent born in Pomerania.

    In 1881 Paul Nipkow sends images over wires using a rotating metal disk technology calling it the electric telescope with 18 lines of resolution.

    1900 And We Called It Television.At the World’s Fair in Paris, the first International Congress of Electricity was held. That is where Russian Constantin Perskyi made the first known use of the word “television.”

    1923 Vladimir Zworykin patents his iconscope a TV camera tube. The iconscope, which he called an electric eye becomes the cornerstone for further television development. Zworykin later develops the kinescope for picture display (aka the reciever).

    1929 Vladimir Zworykin demonstrates the first practical electronic system for both the transmission and reception of images using his new kinescope tube.

    1939 Vladimir Zworykin and RCA conduct experimentally broadcasts from the Empire State Building. Television was demonstrated at the New York World’s Fair and the San Francisco Golden Gate International Exposition. RCA’s David Sarnoff used his company’s exhibit at the 1939 World’s Fair as a showcase for the 1st Presidential speech (Roosevelt) on television and to introduce RCA’s new line of television receivers, some of which had to be coupled with a radio if you wanted to hear sound.

    1943 Vladimir Zworykin developed a better camera tube called the Orthicon. The Orthicon (see photo right) had enough light sensitivity to record outdoor events at night.

    1950 The FCC approves the first color television standard which is replaced by a second in 1953. Vladimir Zworykin developed a better camera tube called the Vidicon.

    #382204

    Anonymous

    Ivan Alexander Getting (January 18, 1912—October 11, 2003) was an American physicist and electrical engineer, credited (along with Roger L. Easton and Bradford Parkinson) with the development of the Global Positioning System (GPS). He was the co-leader (the other being Louis Ridenour) of the research group which developed the SCR-584, an automatic microwave tracking fire-control system, which enabled anti-aircraft guns to destroy a significant percentage of the German V-1 flying bombs launched against London late in the Second World War.

    #382206

    Anonymous

    Michael “Mike” Ilitch Sr. (July 20, 1929) is an American entrepreneur, founder and owner of the international fast food franchise Little Caesars Pizza. He owns both the Detroit Red Wings of the National Hockey League, and Detroit Tigers of Major League Baseball.

    Ilitch has been at the center of Detroit’s downtown redevelopment efforts, purchasing and renovating the Fox Theatre and relocated his business headquarters there. A first generation American of Macedonian descent, he is married to Marian Bayoff Ilitch.

    Simon Trpceski (Macedonian)

    Simon Trpcheski (Simon Trpčeski), OMM (Macedonian: Симон Трпчески, pronounced [ˈsimɔn ˈtr̩ptʃɛski]) (born September 18, 1979, in Skopje, Macedonia), is a Macedonian classical pianist.

    The youngest of three children, his father was a judge and his mother a pharmacist.[1] In 2002, he received his degree in music from the University of St. Cyril and St. Methodius in Skopje, Republic of Macedonia, where he studied with Professor Boris Romanov. By then he had already made his debut in recital at London’s Wigmore Hall in 2001 and had won prizes in international competitions in the United Kingdom, the Czech Republic, and Italy.

    Building on his exposure as a member of the BBC New Generation Scheme 2001-2003, Trpčeski has since 2005 made a rapid series of debuts with orchestras worldwide—including the New York Philharmonic, the San Francisco Symphony, the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the Singapore Symphony Orchestra, the Hong Kong Philharmonic, and the Toronto Symphony—and has made recital tours in the United States, Europe, and Asia. In December 2005 he appeared for the first time in the International Piano Series in London, and he has performed with English orchestras including the London Philharmonic and London Symphony Orchestras, the Hallé Orchestra, the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra, and the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra. In Scandinavia, he has performed with the Stockholm, Bergen, Gothenburg, and Helsinki orchestras and the Swedish Chamber Orchestra.

    Trpčeski’s first recital recording—an EMI Classics Debut Series compact disc including music of Tchaikovsky, Scriabin, Stravinsky and Prokofiev—received both the Editor’s Choice and Debut Album awards from Gramophone magazine. Trpčeski shifted to EMI’s main label with his second disc; it and its two successors comprise single-composer recitals of Rachmaninoff, Chopin, and Debussy respectively.

    In both his concert appearances and his recordings, Trpčeski has received enthusiastic responses from critics and the public alike. Many consider him an unusually gifted new artist at the outset of what promises to be a major career.

    #382211

    Anonymous

    Great Thread!

    Theodosius Dobzhansky

    One of the greatest evolutionary biologists of all time. January 24, 1900 – December 18, 1975)

    Theodosius Dobzhansky was a prominent geneticist and evolutionary biologist, and a central figure in the field of evolutionary biology for his work in shaping the unifying modern evolutionary synthesis. Dobzhansky was born in Ukraine (then part of Imperial Russia) and emigrated to the United States as a young man in 1927.

    He published a major work of the modern evolutionary synthesis, the synthesis of evolutionary biology with genetics, in 1937.

    He was awarded the National Medal of Science in 1964, and the Franklin Medal in 1973.

    Wiki article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodosius_Dobzhansky

    #382212

    Anonymous

    Yuri Kondratyuk (Юрій Кондратюк/Юрий Кондратюк)

    Yuri Vasyliovych Kondratyuk (June 21, 1897–1942), follower, supporter and founder of cosmism, pioneer of astronautics and spaceflight. He was a theoretician and a visionary who, in the early 20th century, foresaw ways of reaching the moon. He is generally credited with the authorship of the first known Lunar Orbit Rendezvous (LOR), a key concept for human landing on the Moon and returning to Earth, published in 1916.

    Kondratyuk was born in Poltava, Ukraine. From an early age, Kondratyuk was fascinated by his father’s books on physics and mathematics and demonstrated great abilities in these areas. When he was old enough to attend high school, he was admitted straight into the third form of a prestigious high school, where he graduated with a gold medal for proficiency a few years later. Kondratyuk joined the Soviet army as a volunteer in June 1941 and perished in 1942 in February 25 near Kaluga. The exact circumstances of his death are not known. His unit was involved in heavy fighting against the German army in October 1941, and October 3 is sometimes given as the date of his demise. Evidence collected in the 1990s suggests that he disappeared in January or February 1942 while repairing a communications cable at night near Zasetski. Because no body was ever recovered, conspiracy theories circulate that he escaped from the Soviet Union and eventually made his way to the United States and worked on the space programme there under yet another identity.

    A science centre and college in Novosibirsk are dedicated to him, and the crater Kondratyuk on the Moon. A minor planet 3084 Kondratyuk discovered by Soviet astronomer Nikolai Stepanovich Chernykh in 1977 is named after him. When Neil Armstrong visited the Soviet Union after his historic flight, he collected a handful of soil from outside Kondratyuk’s house in Novosibirsk to acknowledge his contribution to spaceflight.

    #382214

    Anonymous

    Pedro Opeka- Slovenian-Argentinian Catholic missionary in Africa.  He was nominated for the Nobel peace prize in 2012 and was awarded the French Legion of Honour and the  Golden Order for Services in Slovenia.

    #382216

    Anonymous

    Jožef Stefan

    A Slovene physicist, mathematician and poet. He’s famous mostly for his works in physics, like the <strong>Stefan-Boltzmann law, Stefan-Boltzmann constant σ, Stefan problem, Stefan’s equation, Stefan’s formula, Stefan flow, Stefan number and the Maxwell-Stefan diffusion.

    #382218

    Anonymous

    Joe Sutter (Slovenian-American) “father of the Boeing 747”

    Every time you see the magnificent machine in the air or at your airport thank this man.

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