Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
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  • #474742
    Boris V.
    Boris V.
    Participant
    @dedushka

    [See the full post at: Most common curse words…o kurwa]

    #474960

    pollex
    Participant
    @pollex

    Is word “kurva” completely unknown in South Slavic languages?
    And by the way the East Slavic part of this map is a catastrophe.

    #475029

    NikeBG
    Participant
    @nikebg

    The map in general is… not very accurate. Cyrillic is used only for the three East Slavic nations and only the Russian one is written correctly (then again, neither is the Polish one). The Bulgarian one is written with Latin letters, for some reason (ironic, considering where Cyrillic comes from), and uses a very mild and rather rarely used expression (mostly by translators who don’t want to use profane words) – Deyba/deeba/de’ba (Дейба/Дееба/Де’ба) or any of its richer variations (f.e. Deeba mamka mu deeba, for a clearly disgruntled effect) would be much more accurate. As for former Yugoslavia, an area that’s utterly famous for its swearing, Sranje seems… “mild” is too mildly put. Too bad we lost almost all of the old members with the forum change – we had at least 2-3 Serbs that could shed some more light…

    P.S. Yes, we have kurva as well, but it just means “whore”. It’s not really an exclamation. I think there was a historical Kurvingrad in the Serbian-Bulgarian contact area though:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kurvingrad

    #475041

    pollex
    Participant
    @pollex

    Strange, it seems that there should be an answer to my question from @nikebg and where is it?

    Guys, it’s amazing. I have found the word “kurva” in Bulgarian, Serbian and Slovenian dictionaries.

    Previously I thought that this word is a Latin loanword derived from the Latin word “curva” in one of its meanings “morally wrong”. And because of this it is used only by catholic Slavs.

    But now it seems for me that it’s a native Slavic word common to all Slavic languages (except Russian) if even orthodox Bulgarians and Serbs know it.

    Word “kurva” exists in Ukrainian and Belarusian languages as well.
    Previously I thought that it was borrowed by Ukrainians and Belarusian from Polish.
    Now I’m not sure about it.

    So, it would be more funny if this article were designed in the standard manner when one language (in this case Russian) uses some specific word different from common-slavic one, as for example it was done here for Croatian:
    https://www.slavorum.org/just-croatian-language-things-2/

     

    #475075

    pollex
    Participant
    @pollex

    Correct Ukrainian spelling is “ла..Но” (sh..t) and not “ла..По”

    #475076

    pollex
    Participant
    @pollex

    Correct spelling is “б..ядь” and not “б..ядЭь”. You cannot put “ь” after a vowel in East Slavic languages (isn’t it so in Bulgarian?)

    #475078

    pollex
    Participant
    @pollex

    Belarusian language does not have word “бл..дь”. It’s only Russian.
    What word can be used for Belarus then?
    In my opinion it may be the same “kur..a” or common-slavic “haŭno” (“sh..t”) or “dziarmo” (“sh..t” as well, common with Russian).
    It’s interesting that Belarusian language also has the word “łajno” but its main meaning in Belarusian is rather “rags” then “sh..t” as in Ukrainian.

    #475079

    pollex
    Participant
    @pollex

    Exact equivalent for Polish “ku..wa” in Russian is of cause “бл..дь” and not “х..й”. “Бл..дь” in Russian is (as “ku..wa” in Polish) a common negative exclamation and a rude name for prostitute at the same time.

    “Х..й” instead is the same as “ch..j” in Polish or “caz..o” in Italian.
    And now, dear children, let us repeat the words which you should not repeat:
    “Il numero tre: ca..zo. Non si dice!”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QN6MvTYUUZI

    #475122

    NikeBG
    Participant
    @nikebg

    I did indeed post some remarks about the inaccuracies of the map and some better examples for Bulgaria (deeba and its variations), about how kurva exists in our South-Slavic languages, but only as “whore” (i.e. not as an exclamation) etc. Then I edited my post to add a link to the Wiki article on Kurvingrad and the forum decided to filter my post (even though this was the only link in the post). So I’m waiting for @dedushka to unflag it, so it might eventually appear (maybe)…

    P.S. In Bulgarian, ь can be placed only after a consonant – f.e. Петьо/Petyo. If it’s placed after a vowel, it’s й – Пейо/Peyo.

    #475386

    pollex
    Participant
    @pollex
    #475040

    pollex
    Participant
    @pollex

    Strange, it seems that there should be an answer to my question from @nikebg and where is it?

    Guys, it’s amazing. I have found the word “kurva” in Bulgarian, Serbian and Slovenian dictionaries.

    Previously I thought that this word is a Latin loanword derived from the Latin word “curva” in one of its meanings “morally wrong”. And because of this it is used only by catholic Slavs.

    But now it seems for me that it’s a native Slavic word common to all Slavic languages (except Russian) if even orthodox Bulgarians and Serbs know it.

    Word “kurva” exists in Ukrainian and Belarusian languages as well.
    Previously I thought that it was borrowed by Ukrainians and Belarusian from Polish.
    Now I’m not sure about it.

    So, it would be more funny if this article were designed in the standard manner when one language (in this case Russian) uses some specific word different from common-slavic one, as for example it was done here for Croatian:
    https://www.slavorum.org/just-croatian-language-things-2/

    Now about errors on the map:

    * “shit” in Ukraininan is “лайно” and not “лайпо”

    * Correct spelling is “блядь” and not “блядэь”. You cannot put “ь” after a vowel in East Slavic languages (isn’t it so in Bulgarian?)

    * Belarusian language does not have word “блядь”. It’s only Russian.
    What word can be used for Belarus then?
    In my opinion it may be the same “kurva” or common-slavic “haŭno” (“shit”) or “dziarmo” (“shit” as well, common with Russian).

    It’ interesting that Belorusian language also has the word “łajno” but its main meaning in Belorusian is rather “rags” then “shit” as in Ukrainian.

    * Exact equivalent for “kurva” in Russian is of cause “блядь” and not “хуй”. “Блядь” in Russian is (as “kurwa” in Polish) a common negative exclamation and a rude name for prostitute at the same time.

    “Хуй” instead is the same as “chuj” in Polish or “cazzo” in Italian.

    And now, dear children, let us repeat the word which you should not repeat:
    “Il numero tre: cazzo. Non si dice!”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QN6MvTYUUZI

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