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  • #346387

    Anonymous

    Hello. I want to know some musical instruments which could be described as Slavic. That is – known to Slavs for centuries. I have searched the web and found three instruments – gusle which is a single-stringed instrument accompanied by singing and/or reciting known. Another one is gusli mostly known in the Eastern Europe. Gusli is a multi-stringed instrument shaped kind of like the Byzantine kythare. And the third one is lira known mostly in Ukraine, a variant of hurdy-gurdy.

    Are there any else? I surely missed out on some flutes and other instruments as well.

    #429957

    Anonymous

    some well-known South Slavic (Balkan) instruments

    Tambura (Serbia, Macedonia and Bulgaria)

    Tamburica (Vojvodina, Slavonija and Hungary)

    Šargija (mainly present in Bosnia and Herzegovina)

    Gusle (present predominantly in Montenegro, Herzegovina and southwestern Serbia. also in other parts of the Balkans)

    Frula (present throughout the Balkans)

    Most of these instruments have spread throughout former Yugoslavia so it's not too surprising to see them outside their native countries

    #429958

    Anonymous

    Tambura and tamburica Greek originated, and for that reason it sounds more like "mediterranean" instruments such as mandolin.

    its medieval name was thiamvourin, originated from the ancient Greek pandoura.

    in Balkans (bulgaria and FYROM) it was played for the first time in 18th or 19th century, and possibly in particular classes (as far as i know it was not popular in rular areas).

    #429959

    Anonymous

    I think that drums and wind instruments were used by the ancient Slavs.

    The Serbian frula is an ancient type of recorder made from wood with holes in it.

    Here is how it sounds like.
    majstor frule Milan Kovacevic – Radmilino kolo

    #429960

    Anonymous

    I think every Slavic country has their own version of the bagpipe, but then again almost every country in Europe does, so I don't know if it can be considered "typically Slavic".

    #429961

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I think every Slavic country has their own version of the bagpipe, but then again almost every country in Europe does, so I don't know if it can be considered "typically Slavic".

    bagpipe has mesopotamian roots, then it was adopted by Grecoromans and then it was spreaded to the rest of Europe.

    #429962

    Anonymous
    #429963

    Anonymous

    I never liked the sound of bagpipes. Very irritating noise. It sounds like farm animals being slaughtered.  :(

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