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  • #346906

    Anonymous

    Hello everyone, first post here. I've decided to see if this community might be able to help me in finding the origin and meaning of my surname, "Rypien". I've got some basic google information but perhaps somebody can shed some more light on it, or point me in the proper direction. My grandma, whose maiden name was Kavalok/Kawulok, was born in Canada, but I believe her parents came from Galicia in the early 20th century. Her husband, my grandpa Rypien, was also of Polish descent, but I can't seem to find much of anything about the surname I share with him, beyond what I can find on this site: http://worldnames.publicprofiler.org/. It narrows it down to the Opolskie and Slaskie regions as the places with the greatest prevalence of the name. As far as last names go it's extremely uncommon around here, especially since there is little representation of Slavic surnames in my locality. It's all Smiths and Murphys.

    I thank you in advance for anything of note you can share with me; any info helps! If someone who is actually from Poland has some knowledge to share I would be quite interested in hearing it. I look forward to further posting here in the future.

    #434453

    Anonymous

    Is this Rypien or Rypień?

    Surname Rypień is located mostly in Silesia.

    http://nazwiska-polskie.pl/Rypie%C5%84

    With the surname Kawulok is quite the same.

    http://nazwiska-polskie.pl/Kawulok

    #434454

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    Is this Rypien or Rypień?

    Surname Rypień is located mostly in Silesia.

    http://nazwiska-polskie.pl/Rypie%C5%84

    With the surname Kawulok is quite the same.

    http://nazwiska-polskie.pl/Kawulok

    I guess it could've had the accent over the n at some point, but I've never seen it spelled that way. I've been told by family members that at some point in our past we went by Łougasa-Rypien. I'm not completely sure about why there's a double name, or if it's even accurate. How would you go about pronouncing Rypień? I've always pronounced Rypien without the n accent as "ree-pee-in", but maybe that's just an anglicized version.

    #434455

    Anonymous

    It is not an accent, it is a different letter. "Ń" sounds simply like the English word "knee". But shorter. And mostly is sounds like "knee" without "ee". It depends – you have "ń" and "ni" for the same letter in pronunciation, but it depends on ortography – you know, vowels, consonats before and after etc.

    In Poland there are present double surnames – it happens when, for example a woman who is married wants to have her surname and a surname of her husband. It varies. But in Poland there is no surname like "Łougasa". "Ou" is not Polish.

    Due to IPA symbols "Rypień" would look like this:
    /rɨpjɛɲ/

    #434456

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    It is not an accent, it is a different letter. "Ń" sounds simply like the English word "knee". But shorter. And mostly is sounds like "knee" without "ee". It depends – you have "ń" and "ni" for the same letter in pronunciation, but it depends on ortography – you know, vowels, consonats before and after etc.

    In Poland there are present double surnames – it happens when, for example a woman who is married wants to have her surname and a surname of her husband. It varies. But in Poland there is no surname like "Łougasa". "Ou" is not Polish.

    Due to IPA symbols "Rypień" would look like this:
    /rɨpjɛɲ/

    Hi there, I'm the OP. Sorry, but I had to make a new account; the one I posted on in this thread previously I used a stupid joke name, hopefully this change is alright. If I'm gonna post here I wanna use my real name, why wouldn't I? I'm used to trying to not draw attention to my name because it's different and people made a lot of fun of me for it, which made me sensitive, but I feel like here I can be proud of it. I hope that this doesn't bother anyone, don't mean to seem finicky.

    I tried to question my dad about the origins of Łougasa, and its significance in my genealogy, as I haven't been able to find anything regarding that name online. He didn't know much. I don't even know if it's spelled right. It reminds me of Lugosi a bit, maybe it's Hungarian or something (unlikely), or the name of a town somewhere. Maybe it was simply a misunderstanding and has nothing to do with my family, which would explain why I can't find a single thing about it anywhere. Unfortunately both my grandparents on my father's side are dead, so I can't ask them. My grandmother's recent passing is sort of what caused me to delve into my family's history a bit more, with all the being around relatives I've never met and hearing their stories of my extended family. I've even got a couple of my grandmother's handwritten recipes for traditional Polish baked goods now, and I plan to make them as soon as I get the chance, to relive the enjoyable moments in my childhood when she would visit and bake for us.

    I've found someone on Facebook with the last name Rypienová, is this somehow related to Rypień? Before she died, my grandmother went to Poland to visit relatives, I'd love to try and find some of these people and maybe learn more from them about our family ties. Both my paternal grandparents spoke Polish as children, and my oldest aunt only learned to speak English once she started attending school in Canada, where I'm assuming that speaking anything but English was frowned upon. I feel bad for not knowing more about my roots, since there seems to be so few Rypiens around I feel like it's part of my duty to research this stuff and find out where I really come from.

    I really appreciate your expertise on this, the IPA pronounciation is excellent. Basically I've been slightly mispronouncing my last name, not counting the letter "ń" but rather "n" as I spell it. I feel like it's possible the "ń" was dropped when my dad's side of the family came to Canada.

    #434457

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    I've even got a couple of my grandmother's handwritten recipes for traditional Polish baked goods now, and I plan to make them as soon as I get the chance, to relive the enjoyable moments in my childhood when she would visit and bake for us.

    Cakes? :D

    Quote:
    I've found someone on Facebook with the last name Rypienová, is this somehow related to Rypień?

    No, it is not Polish. Rypienová may be Czech or Slovak – in Polish alphabet there is no "v" letter, while "w" is pronunced like "v". And there is no "á" letter. It can be connected only by ethymology and meaning of the surname.

    Quote:
    Before she died, my grandmother went to Poland to visit relatives, I'd love to try and find some of these people and maybe learn more from them about our family ties.

    What about your grandparents siblings?

    Quote:
    since there seems to be so few Rypiens around I feel like it's part of my duty to research this stuff and find out where I really come from.

    Well. I don't know from where my great grandfather came. Mother told me, that he arrived as a baby with his mother in one village nearby, but no one knew from where exactly. It is tough to check it now, so I have a similiar problem :p

    Quote:
    Basically I've been slightly mispronouncing my last name, not counting the letter "ń" but rather "n" as I spell it. I feel like it's possible the "ń" was dropped when my dad's side of the family came to Canada.

    I assume it happened due to the absence of this letter in English alphabet, so to make it easier they changed "ń" to "n".

    Btw, what about Łougasa… "Ou" is "u" in Poland, but there is no "Ługasa". I've found somewhere a surname "Ługas", but adding "a" letter at the end is just… well I'm curious why it is there. So probably "Ługas" is not a good clue at all.

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