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  • #346245

    Anonymous

    Kurentovanje, where we dress like our local Alpine deity Kurent to "scare away winter"

    [img width=700]http://www.sava-hotels-resorts.com/assets/O-destinacijah/Terme-Ptuj/_resampled/croppedimage305193-Kurentovanje.jpg” />

    Then we have a bit of Germanic mythology together with Christian, namely Parkelj (Germanic Krampus) accompanies St. Nicholaus (Miklavž) on December 6th:
    image

    In Southern Slovenia bordering with Croatia, in a region called Bela krajina, there is an annual festival called Jurjevanje, where they celebrate "Zeleni Jurij" (Jarilo). The local folklore and culture in Bela krajina is quite different to the rest of Slovenia, and is closer to the bordering Croats, so I'm pretty sure there is "Jurjevanje" in those parts of Croatia as well:
    image

    Then as far as superstition/stories go, I'm aware of a spirit called Šubin supposedly haunting some mines in Ukraine, and they even sent a Christian mission to "cast out the demons."

    That's all I know of, but there HAS to be more!

    I'm aware of Slava among Serbs, where St. Ilija is actually Perun and so forth, or the Božič-Svarožič link, but I'm interested in more direct examples.

    I was wondering whether there are any examples of Slavic gods or other beings that have survived Christianization and have remained part of our cultures in the form of festivals, superstitions, etc.

    #426637

    Anonymous

    What about lighting bonefires on kresna noč? And I know there are some old traditions in connection with Christmas in Slovenia. Croats have Badnjak, when they burn a "badnjak" and other stuff.

    #426638

    Anonymous

    We have Ivanjski Kresovi in Croatia too (the two large bon-fires)

    [img width=700 height=466]http://kaportal.hr/portal/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/img_2538.jpg” />

    #426639

    Anonymous

    To the OP. The Zeleni Jurij (Green George) is now asociated with White Carniola but it was actually more widespread. Besides White Carniola it presisted for quite long time in Styria and Carinthia and its said to have existed in all (rest) of Slovene territory as well. Jurjevanje in White Carniola survived becouse of folklore groups that worked to revive it. The tradition is or/and was also present i west Croatia as far as i know thow maybe even beyond, idk?

    In Carinthia he was often dressed in straw becouse of climatic reasons and he was usually called Šentjurij (Saint George) isntead. He had followers behind him bukled with livestock (example cow) bells. In some areas he arrived with a horse, etc. Ultimately the tradition differated from area to area, there was no unified custom around it. By folklore Zeleni Jurij has one side of trousers green and other red.

    Picture of Zeleni Jurij in Styria (tradition there was most strong around Celje and Laško);

    image

    #426640

    Anonymous
    Quote:
    To the OP. The Zeleni Jurij (Green George) is now asociated with White Carniola but it was actually more widespread. Besides White Carniola it presisted for quite long time in Styria and Carinthia and its said to have existed in all (rest) of Slovene territory as well. Jurjevanje in White Carniola survived becouse of folklore groups that worked to revive it. The tradition is or/and was also present i west Croatia as far as i know thow maybe even beyond, idk?

    In Carinthia he was often dressed in straw becouse of climatic reasons and he was usually called Šentjurij (Saint George) isntead. He had followers behind him bukled with livestock (example cow) bells. In some areas he arrived with a horse, etc. Ultimately the tradition differated from area to area, there was no unified custom around it. By folklore Zeleni Jurij has one side of trousers green and other red.

    Picture of Zeleni Jurij in Styria (tradition there was most strong around Celje and Laško);

    image

    Since you're mentioning Styria, in Šentjur pri Celju they still have the annual fair a couple of days around St George's day. But I'm afraid that's all that is left from Jurjevanje around here …

    #426641

    Anonymous

    Rusalle is celebrated in in Palesia of southern Belarus by the Poleshuyks. The celebration is cult of Rusalkas which disappeared in the 1970s being re-instated in the last 10 years.

    [img width=700 height=525]http://s28.postimg.org/44qgo62xp/image.jpg” />

    image

    image


    In eastern Slavia on Maslenitsa – the celebration of winter's end ) is widely celebrated during which the doll made of straws is burnt signifying the end of of the winter. Some people call the doll 'Maslenitsa', others call it Mara, Marena.  .She's a deity of death which exists in western Slavic mythology.

     
    image

    [img width=700 height=462]http://s12.postimg.org/smkn8wwu5/6715.jpg” />

    [img width=700 height=440]http://s12.postimg.org/5ju49qvct/img_9345.jpg” />

    [img width=700 height=393]http://s12.postimg.org/5vbkmibst/maxresdefault.jpg” />

    —-

    Jurja Day is an important celebration in Belarusian folklore during spring when the cattle is grazed for the first.  The celebration of Belarusain Jurja differs from those of Ukraine and Russia.
    Some ethnographers believe Jurja (St George) assumed the fucntions  of Jarilla deity

    There's a Illja day which isn't widely celebrated. Illja is reincornatin of Perun.

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